14
   

WHEN IS DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME OVER??

 
 
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 05:47 am
I have two "Atomic Clocks" that have already changed over to Standard Time. I was waay early to a personal meeting yesterday.

WHYEVEN BOTHER? I say lets keep DST all year. The whole thing was set up for farmers who are used to one milking in the dark anyway. It doesnt affect the amount of daylight time we experience. Thats an orbital issue and Congress cant do anything about it.
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 05:51 am
They only do it to piss you off . . .
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 05:55 am
@Setanta,
Is this what its like being 60?. Im getting pissed off at lightbulbs. I never used to do **** like that. I was always pretty bright and gay.
(Not that theres anything wrong with that)
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:11 am
I got pissed off at the garbage as i was carrying it to the kerb this morning, so, yeah, maybe it's age . . .
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:26 am
I was in Arizona in September. Apparently, it is the only state in the union that does not abide by DST., except on Native American lands. The first place that I hit in Arizona, they had clocks showing the times in the various zones, and Arizona was lumped in the Pacific time zone.

That was WRONG, and confused the hell out of me. Actually, if one wants to be correct about it, Arizona is in Mountain Standard Time. It is nowhere near the Pacific.

Anyhow that reminds me when I was in Juarez, Mexico, cutting loose from the 1st Mr. P. (That's another delightful story, but I will save that for later). Anyhow, it seems that El Paso, which is right next to Juarez, are in two different time zones. For some unfathomable reason, (what the hell, I was 24, and did not know which end was up)I went halfway across the country without a watch.

I was walking around Juarez. When I asked people the time, they realized that I was an American, and gave me the El Paso time. Since I was in Juarez, that did not do me any good. On top of that, my attorney was supposed to have me stay in a hotel in El Paso. Instead, I was in a $4.00 a night room in Juarez. There was a sign on my sink, "don't drink the water".

Being careful, I lived on Coca Cola for around 24 hours, which might explain my confusion.

Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:28 am
@Phoenix32890,
Most of Indiana don't put up with that ****, either.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:32 am
@farmerman,
That way the electrical companies can make more money.
When I get up at 7 it is bright.
After DLS time in the spring I still get up at 7 but according to nature is 6, so I have to use my lamps......
I agree we are pissed off.
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:37 am
Farmer - Your atomic clocks apparently missed the Memo that DST was extended by a month or so a few years back. I assume you bought them prior to this?

I had always heard it was about the farmers, but the last extension was put forth as a way to save energy. Mostly, it just leaves me in the dark, which I'm gonna blame on the age thing, too.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 06:40 am
@Phoenix32890,
Phoenix32890 wrote:
I was in Arizona in September. Apparently, it is the only state in the union that does not abide by DST., except on Native American lands. The first place that I hit in Arizona, they had clocks showing the times in the various zones, and Arizona was lumped in the Pacific time zone.

That was WRONG, and confused the hell out of me. Actually, if one wants to be correct about it, Arizona is in Mountain Standard Time. It is nowhere near the Pacific.

Anyhow that reminds me when I was in Juarez, Mexico, cutting loose from the 1st Mr. P. (That's another delightful story, but I will save that for later). Anyhow, it seems that El Paso, which is right next to Juarez, are in two different time zones. For some unfathomable reason, (what the hell, I was 24, and did not know which end was up)I went halfway across the country without a watch.

I was walking around Juarez. When I asked people the time, they realized that I was an American, and gave me the El Paso time. Since I was in Juarez, that did not do me any good. On top of that, my attorney was supposed to have me stay in a hotel in El Paso. Instead, I was in a $4.00 a night room in Juarez. There was a sign on my sink, "don't drink the water".

Being careful, I lived on Coca Cola for around 24 hours, which might explain my confusion.

Years ago, I had a legal secretary named Laura,
who took a 2 week vacation to Mexico.
She returned to work prematurely, explaining that she awoke
in her Mexican hotel bed with fever n convulsions.
She aborted her vacation.
The next nite, her hotel fell down when the Mexico started shaking n quaking.
She was not in it.

Maybe she did not read the sign.





David
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  3  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 09:52 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
WHEN IS DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME OVER??

Nov 7th, 2 am.
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 10:05 am
I'm saving up all the daylight time I can store so I can use it in late December when I really need it.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 10:08 am
@Reyn,
last week in Europe

weird eh
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 10:44 am
@squinney,
squinney wrote:

I had always heard it was about the farmers, but the last extension was put forth as a way to save energy.



The temporary one in 1973 (4?) was due to the oil embargo. They repealed it after a number of kids got hit by cars while waiting in the dark for the bus in the morning. Called it a safety decision. This most recent change was driven by business interests looking to extend shopping hours. It seems that folks don't stop to shop on the way home from work if it's dark out, so they extended the time on the calendar that commuters would be commuting in daylight after work. I've got an old thread around here with links somewhere... I'll see if I can find it.

As and early morning riser, I hate it! I vowed at the time not to shop between 5:00 and 6:00 during the extra 3 weeks. I still don't do it.

Edit -- here's one (sans links)
http://able2know.org/topic/124556-1
0 Replies
 
JPB
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 10:51 am
Interesting effect in Indiana's case...

Quote:
Although a 1976 report by the National Bureau of Standards disputed the 1975 U.S. Department of Transportation study, and found that DST-related energy savings were insignificant, the DOT study continued to influence decisions about Daylight Saving Time.

The argument in favor of saving energy swayed Indiana, where until 2005, only about 16 percent of counties observed Daylight Saving Time. Based on the DOT study, advocates of Indiana DST estimated that the state’s residents would save over $7 million in electricity costs each year. Now that Indiana has made the switch, however, researchers have found the opposite to be the case. Scientists from the University of California, Santa Barbara, compared energy usage over the course of three years in Indiana counties that switched from year-round Standard Time to DST. They found that Indianans actually spent $8.6 million more each year because of Daylight Saving Time, and increased emissions came with a social cost of between $1.6 million and $5.3 million per year. Commentators have theorized that the energy jump is due to the increased prevalence of home air conditioning over the past 40 years, in that more daylight toward the end of a summer’s day means that people are more likely to use their air conditioners when they come home from work.

However, the Indiana research findings don’t necessarily apply elsewhere. In cooler climates, for example, energy savings may well occur. Source
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 10:57 am
Benjamin Franklin, author of the proverb, "Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise", anonymously published a letter suggesting that Parisians economize on candles by rising earlier to use morning sunlight. This 1784 satire proposed taxing shutters, rationing candles, and waking the public by ringing church bells and firing cannons at sunrise. Franklin did not propose DST. 18th-century Europe did not keep precise schedules. However, this soon changed as rail and communication networks came to require a standardization of time unknown in Franklin's day.
Modern DST was first proposed by the New Zealand entomologist George Vernon Hudson, whose shift-work job gave him leisure time to collect insects, and made him aware of the value of after-hours daylight.
Starting on 30 April 1916, Germany and its World War I allies were the first to use DST (ger.: Sommerzeit) as a way to conserve coal during wartime. Britain, most of its allies, and many European neutrals soon followed suit. Russia and a few other countries waited until the next year and the United States adopted it in 1918. Since then, the world has seen many enactments, adjustments, and repeals
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 12:20 pm
@farmerman,
Constantly changing back and forth keeps the folks in the sleeping pill and alarm clock industries employed.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 01:45 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

It doesnt affect the amount of daylight time we experience.


Whaaat!? Who've you been listening to?
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 07:57 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Whaaat!? Who've you been listening to?
I got it off the guy from whom I buy all my mesquite!!
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 10:10 pm
@farmerman,
Well then, you've been listening to a damn crook!

How about an order of nicely processed railroad tie charcoal, though?
0 Replies
 
Sglass
 
  1  
Reply Tue 2 Nov, 2010 11:31 pm
I think Hawaii is dst all year round.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

Daylight saving time - Discussion by BumbleBeeBoogie
Lost and . . . found? - Question by Setanta
Daylight Savings??? What a Crock!!! - Discussion by ebrown p
 
  1. Forums
  2. » WHEN IS DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME OVER??
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/19/2019 at 02:55:59