8
   

CHUMLY---HOW MUCH JUICE DOES A TV USE?

 
 
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 05:14 pm
A big screen TV , plus the peripherals, is supposed to use a lot of power. ANy ideas as to how I may calculte these appliances electric use (and any other appliances). Im doing a cost benefit for putting in a solar system on the barn roof, and Ive gotta, (IF IM GONNA DO IT) allocate at least 5% of the project cost by end of 2010 so I can qualify for both the FEd and the STate tax credit. (Im afraid that, as soon as the GOP gets in, all this **** will be gone), because it has to be reauthorized by end of year

PS, are you the Chumly guy on "PAwn STars"?

 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 05:26 pm
@farmerman,
If you look on the back of your TV, you will probably find a UL tag that lists the voltage required and power usage for your TV. If you can't find it there, check the owner's manual.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 05:31 pm
@engineer,
Roger . I got a 120-220 V (Why would anyone want to wire a tv 220?) and its 1.4 AMPS. JEEZUS CHRIST. Now I gotta go to my electric bill to see what Im paying a Kw hour. I have a feeling Im not gonna like this.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 05:39 pm
@farmerman,
HOLY ****. According to the VxA+watts=(.1 kw hour) Its costing me over 35 bucks a month to run these two tvs. Or 420 bucks a year. And I have no idea what the "ghost drain" for the clocks and **** and the cable box are costing.
Does this sound near right?
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 06:15 pm
@farmerman,
I can't speak about all big screen displays as there's a very broad range of power consumption. I can say that my Samsung 46-in HDTV (LED) uses between 90-150 watts, depending on setting and whats displaying; however,
my sister's 46-in plasma HDTV display uses 400 watts.
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 06:22 pm
I think my 42 plasma eats about 300w on average, but I still want a bigger one.

In standby mode, or "ghosting"....I've read that they use way more energy than most people think....one of the items, maybe cell phone chargers...use nearly the same amount of juice charging as they do simply being plugged in.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 06:25 pm
@Ragman,
Ours are "Lucky Golstars" LG and the 50 incher is 168 watts and the 28 is 112. I wonder how I can calc the wattage for the cable box and the Blu RAy with internet connection.
All this **** has an "eye" and the stuff stays on because it is always setting the right time even after I shut it off or pull plugs.
I think I need some main poqer switch cauase all this crap is plugged in at the back and it all sits on a blanket chest. It was half a bitch just reading the damn tag that engireer told me about.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 07:03 pm
@farmerman,
In Sacramento when I was attempting to get my apartment's living expenses down to the barest of the bare bones, I found that when I unplugged all the electronics from the wall when not in use (rather than just turning off the power switch on the equipment and leaving them in stand-by mode, I saved about $5 a month on the electric bill. This included a stereo, VCR, old-fashioned analog TV, a digital converter box, microwave oven, and a wall clock that I swapped out for a battery operated one. You probably have a lot more than that in your house that don't have to always be in stand-by mode.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 07:14 pm
@Butrflynet,
anything with a clock that is compouter literate with the appliance.(microwave Tvs Cable Oven Refrigeraters, freezers, radios, all have a ghost drain that (based upon your Kw-hr rate, will vary from 75 cents to a buck and a half a mointh. Everytime I use a microwave its 1kw-hr.
0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 07:48 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

HOLY ****. According to the VxA+watts=(.1 kw hour) Its costing me over 35 bucks a month to run these two tvs. Or 420 bucks a year.

This seems high. 120W x 1.4A = 168W. I don't know how much TV you watch per day, say 2hr, so 2hr x 168W / 1000 = .336 kwh/day. My power company charges around $0.11/kwh, so 3.7 cents per day. That's pretty much in line with this website.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Oct, 2010 07:53 pm
@engineer,
acchh, youre right. I needed to move one more decimal space. 3.5 bucks a month for my TVs not 35 . Whew.

Now I m gonna just go around and add up stuff with timers and clocks and sensors.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2010 12:20 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Why would anyone want to wire a tv 220?


It's not a question of "wiring" for 220 volts. Many electronic appliances are multivoltage these days and will operate from (around) 100 volts to (around) 250 volts. For example my PC tower will work on anywhere between 98 volts and 240 volts. Many countries use 220 to 250 volts as the standard domestic voltage. 250 is standard in Europe and Australia. It's cheaper to make a TV for worldwide use.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2010 01:07 pm
@contrex,
Electronics in USA (TV, CD/DVD players, HDTV, etc) do NOT have a 220V capability. To my knowledge these electronic devices would need a power converter to run on 220V as well as the odd-shaped power plug. then there's that pesky diff. phase issue, 60 hz vs 50 hz.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2010 04:45 pm
@Ragman,
why then, do they list it on the UL tag on the back of my TVs ?.
II realize that the wiring would have to be reconfigured. (I had many of my standing shop tools that werent 220, rewired for 220)
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2010 05:35 pm
@farmerman,
http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/travelpower/7657/

Quote:
Are Watts killing you?

You're taking electricity for granted. Know how we know? Because we're geeks too, and when the power goes out, we're suddenly wondering what the heck to do with ourselves. (Especially if our cell phones are also dead... that's a state of emergency if we ever heard of one!) Electricity is the breath of life for our entertainment, our hobbies, our work, and well, everything. But have you ever wondered how much power your devices are actually consuming? Is having your computer on 24/7 the reason why your power bill is so high or is it the new-fangled microwave in the kitchen?

The Kill-A-Watt allows you to connect your appliances and assess how efficient they are. A large LCD display counts consumption by the Kilowatt-hour, just like your not-so-friendly utility company. You can figure out your electrical expenses by the hour, day, week, month, even an entire year. Monitor the quality of your power by displaying Voltage, Line Frequency, and Power Factor.

* Enables cost forecasting
* Accurate to within 0.2%
* Cumulative killowatt-hour monitor
* Displays Volts, Amps, Watts, Hz, VA, KWH, Power Factor
* Operating voltage: 115 VAC
* Max current: 15 A
* Max power: 1875 VA
* Dimensions: 5 1/8" X 1 5/8" X 2 3/8"
* Also see Watt's Up which records data on power consumption

0 Replies
 
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Oct, 2010 05:41 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:

Electronics in USA (TV, CD/DVD players, HDTV, etc) do NOT have a 220V capability. To my knowledge these electronic devices would need a power converter to run on 220V as well as the odd-shaped power plug. then there's that pesky diff. phase issue, 60 hz vs 50 hz.

I don't think that is correct. Some equipment is made to run on either system. My electric razor makes a point of mentioning it. My laptop needs a converter for the plug, but does not require a transformer to step down the voltage.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 08:32 am
@engineer,
Admittedly, I'm a bit hazy about the details, though I was a tech in the '70-'90s. I realize that small items like razors and power drills may ONLY need the plug adapter; however, I'm not sure that's true when it comes to HDTV and other tvs, whether or not you need a step-up xformer device. I'd be interested in knowing more.

With laptops being so international and highly mobile, perhaps they designed in the built-in adapter/xformer. Whereas for TVs which are intended to be fixed in the consumers home, they save the buyer the $20 higher price for the 'not-needed' feature of adaptabuilty to diff voltages and phase /frequency.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 11:45 am
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:

... Whereas for TVs which are intended to be fixed in the consumers home, they save the buyer the $20 higher price for the 'not-needed' feature of adaptability to diff voltages and phase /frequency.


That should have read:

"Whereas for TVs which are intended to be fixed in the consumers home, PERHAPS they might be saving the buyer the $20 higher price for the 'not-needed' feature "
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 12:12 pm
Quote:
PERHAPS they might be saving the buyer the $20 higher price for the 'not-needed' feature "


But balance that against the saving in manufacturing costs by having just one type of autovolt supply for all markets world wide.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 31 Oct, 2010 01:05 pm
@contrex,
I wasn't arguing pro or con , just stating an objective observation. Still researching this to satisfy my curiosity.
0 Replies
 
 

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