Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 09:33 am
Archaeologists have discovered an approximately 7300 year old wooden well during excavations in the Czech Republic. The researchers write in the "Journal of Archaeological Science" that it is the oldest preserved wooden construction, precisely dated by the annual rings. The shaft dates from the year 5256 or 5255 B.C.

The scientists were impressed by the "advanced carpentry skills" of our ancestors at that time. The oak panels were inserted in grooves in the corner posts.

The well was discovered by archaeologists during excavation work before the construction of a new motorway connection near the village of Ostrov in the Pardubice administrative region. It was only in December 2012 that researchers near Leipzig uncovered four wooden wells more than 7000 years old. The wells in Saxony are about 50 years younger than the one now discovered, said Tegel, who was involved in both projects.

Science direct: World's oldest dendrochronologically dated archaeological wood construction
Quote:
Abstract
In 2018, during the construction of a motorway in the East Bohemian Region near the town of Ostrov (Czech Republic), archaeologists excavated a structure of a wooden water well lining with a square base area of 80 × 80 cm and 140 cm in height. Due to the excellent conservation of the oak timbers, studies of technological details and precise tree-ring dating were possible. The used trees were felled in the years 5256/55 BC, which makes this well the oldest dendrochronologically dated archaeological wooden construction worldwide. It is the third well from the Early Neolithic period that has been discovered in the Czech Republic within the last four years. The design consists of grooved corner posts with inserted planks. This type of construction reveals advanced technical know-how and, till now, is the only known type from this region and time period. Thanks to the combination of annually resolved and absolutely dated tree-ring widths (TRWs), the Czech oak TRW chronology has been significantly extended back to 5481 BC. Wood anatomical identification of fragments from the well filling show mainly oak (Quercus spp.) and hazel (Corylus spp.), indicating a local forest composition dominated by these taxa. The shape of the individual structural elements and tool marks preserved on their surface confirm sophisticated carpentry skills. Based on these observations, we established a model for the “chaîne opératoire” from forest utilization to the final artefact at the beginning of the Early Neolithic period.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 11:56 am
@Walter Hinteler,
7300 y old wood dated by tree rings. That pretty spiffy.
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 12:08 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Such skill! You wonder how they were able to cut grooves and mill planks — and how they even came up with the idea of "frame and panel" construction.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 12:28 pm
@hightor,
they used a router
neptuneblue
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 01:41 pm
I saw an ad that if you sat through their online add for 30 minutes, you'd get access to a booklet of 1001 woodworking plans from Buck Connors Woodworking. Turns out the only thing I got was a spammed inbox 3 times a day to purchase $499 worth of video tapes.

All I wanted was how to rebuilt a century home's staircase to take out the triangle step. I did find some online calculators that seems pretty easy to use. The project has to wait until summer so I'm using different calculators to make sure they all give the same dimensions.

So yeah, I'd be interested in some great advice...
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 01:53 pm
@farmerman,
Powered by a guy on a moped
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 02:21 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
The wells in Saxony are about 50 years younger than the one now discovered, said Tegel, who was involved in both projects.
Although these wells are 50 years younger, the report about those in Saxony gives some interested findings as well

Early Neolithic Water Wells Reveal the World's Oldest Wood Architecture
0 Replies
 
hightor
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Feb, 2020 03:00 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
they used a router

I was thinking of a squirrel-powered dado cutter .
0 Replies
 
Leadfoot
 
  0  
Reply Thu 6 Feb, 2020 08:28 am
It was aliens.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Feb, 2020 10:33 am
@farmerman,
Dendrochonology is the term. It's one of those funny words that sticks in your head once you've heard it. Well it does me anyway.

Btw, the spell check hasn't heard of it either.
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Feb, 2020 10:34 am
@neptuneblue,
I'm sorry I can't help. You wouldn't want my help either. You'd want someone good.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Feb, 2020 11:16 am
@izzythepush,
all ya gotta do is work at it for 30 + years and all we say is tree ring dating so most people understnd when you talk about mthodology.

Most Fundamentalists dont accept its method, even when we hve photos of trees over 100 yars ago being planted and then using core dating a few years ago and the dates are dead on.

Syllabic economy, thats the ticket
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Feb, 2020 11:32 am
@farmerman,
It's a bloody good word, and I like using it.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Feb, 2020 01:21 pm
@farmerman,
The combined oak and pine tree-ring chronologies of Hohenheim University are the backbone of the Holocene radiocarbon calibration for central Europe, covering more than 12, 500 years.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Feb, 2020 02:11 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
TRIdaS has been adopted here in the US and I was no aware that there was a signd on standard for tree ring analyses.
Tree ring work that I do is NOT associated with archeological sites but is mostly used for doing "Tree ring ratio indexes" which help tackle the tracking of ground -water pollution near mining sites where things like organic solvents or arsenic/lad were part of the overburden .

Im really not sure that we have a standard here in the US. I know weve been using pecans and oaks as well as sequoia.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Jun, 2020 06:23 pm
@farmerman,
ABout 25 years ago we took up our old attic floor to actually insulate the upper floors (I never gave it a thought forthose years , I carefully removed the "attic pine" boards and saved them and put em up so they wouldnt cup , while I thought of some decent projects. I have about 8 really great pine boards of 16 foot by 24 to 26 inches wide !!!! by 6?4 stock. Im planning on building a bucket bnch and a diminutive blanekt chst after ons built by the "Soap Hollow" orkshop from the early 1800's. Soap Hollow was a boys chool an sorta like a training school for orphan boys. Ive already had several tempting offers to sell the boards to a woodcrafter who wa going to make a"Shaker style" series of base cabinets using the 8 great boards and the rest of them (They are all no less than 12 to 18inches wide.)

I decided to not sell them for Id always kick myself if I did. Nope, gonna make some antiques.

The oldest (widest) pine board, I had made a small line sample from which I extracted a core . I use the reference tree cores from Penn State and U of Penn American archeology labs. The widest board from which I purposely extracted a non perpendicular "To the heart wood center" and calibrated it from wood samples from the Old City of Philadelphia. Based on "cross indexing" (using local annual weather pattern from many years of wet,cold, drought and one flood event. e were able to date the boards to about -575 years (from the date when which I pulled them off the floors. We had a most persfect record of the precolonial era and french and Indian wars (when the trees were harvested and pit sawn and placed on an attic. The boards were all a bit ratty , as if theyd been used once bfore. (There were evidences of other earklier cast nails in the wood) Those I easily got freed and I stored em in the barn or about the last 25 years.

Ive gotten some plans from the Robacker estate and Im going to modify them somehwat (keep the spirit there but notmake it so ornate as the Robacher bucket bench had a "whaleback" frame and I wanted a more plain look so e could focus on the wood. Im going to dovetail the whole thing but first Ill draw it up to se whether it looks decent> Ive seen some dovetailed work that wound up looking way too "busy" when it got finished.
Any ideas lemme know. My woodworking buddies want me to do a YOU_TUBE, but usually those DIY You-Tubers are more interested in shooting off at the mouth and Im afraid Ill be like that and wont have anyone interested in the work..
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Jun, 2020 07:34 pm
Many youtubers talk so copiously because their revenue has something to do with it. I would be greatly interested to see a project like this.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Jun, 2020 07:46 pm
@edgarblythe,
I watch a guy called Peter Draws. He does rather clever doodles and is always getting sent fountain pens and art supplies from art compnies and his audience and he tries em out then keeps em. He is also sponsored by one of those companies that sells training DVD's on how to paint, draw, sculpt etc.

Maybe
Making **** from 500 year ol wood.

I know a guy who dives into the deepest parts of the Susquehanna River to rescue waterlooged logs that have been laying at the bottom of the river NOT DECOMPOSING. He brings em up and slowly dries em using polyethylene glycol . The wood takes ona really neat gray and red color.

Trouble is, I gotta take a short nap every day. Even on the job.

One time I took a nap while we were doing a LIDAR survey and I was the only guy at the base station. I fell asleep and woke up about an hour later and there were maybe q dozen wild turkeys all around. Usually you make a sound and they get spooked. These guys were curious about me(maybe they thought I was dead) and just hung out till I woke up and then they took off like rabbits.




\\
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Jun, 2020 07:57 pm
I understand about the naps. I've got to have them.
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 5 Jun, 2020 08:00 pm
I went to youtube and subscribed to Peter Draws.
 

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