23
   

If you are a low/no meat eater, how do you feel about meat imitations?

 
 
Thomas
 
  3  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 08:26 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
"virtuous vegans" seems to summit up for me

I apologize for repeating myself, but apparently it's necessary because you and Setanta were a little careless in reading the post you were criticizing. I'm a Utilitarian. I don't do virtue. If what seems unconscionable to me seems conscionable to you, good for you! I won't try to convert you.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 08:42 pm
@Thomas,
I'm very interested in the results coming out of the zero waste farming movement research.

I did my vegetarian time, am fascinated by the studies by the high environmental costs of the 100 mile diet, and think it's now time to take the zero waste group seriously.

I'm trying to track down an interesting interview I listened to recently on the subject.

It's basically larger-scale versions of traditional farms - red meat/poultry/veggies all growing together with fish and bacteria as the additional factors.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 08:46 pm
@ehBeth,
(listening)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 09:00 pm
@ossobuco,
http://www.worldchanging.com/archives/002954.html

http://www.wasteanddisposalspecialists.com/pages/zero-waste-agriculture

Still trying to track down the interview. One of the best side effects was no stinky manure.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 09:07 pm
@ehBeth,
Thanks. Back manana.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 09:08 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:
I did my vegetarian time, am fascinated by the studies by the high environmental costs of the 100 mile diet, and think it's now time to take the zero waste group seriously.

Yes, sure, but ... as a foodie, how do you feel about meat imitations?
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2010 09:08 pm
I love meat, but try not to eat too much of it. My wife and I went to Black Angus for dinner, and had their special plate with ribs, steak, and shrimp. I had their red house wine with my dinner. Brought half of it home, and had it for today's lunch. Tonight's dinner was salad with fake crab meat.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 04:09 am
@Thomas,
It seems that you are equally as careless in making the effort to understand what you read. I used the expression "virtuous vegans," it's in the plural, and therefore obviously does not refer to thee (i'm making a point of using the singular). I was speaking of vegans in general, and have no reason to assume that you are a vegan, having seen you suck down peameal bacon as though there would be no tomorrow.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 05:25 am
@Setanta,
I see. So, am I to understand that tofu eaters among us "conflicted carnivores" are not hypocrites to you?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 05:31 am
Anyone who eats tofu is doing the planet a disservice. That doesn't mean that i accuse them of willfully behaving in an irresponsible manner. Vegans who sneer at meat eaters while eating their tofu, are, nevertheless, hopeless hypocrites, although certainly, they don't know it and likely wouldn't believe it if you explained it to them. Vegans are, in my experience, often obsessively doctrinaire.
Thomas
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 05:35 am
@Setanta,
Fair enough, I think I understand your point now.

And while I do enjoy sneering at meat eaters, I take care to being an equal-opportunity sneerer at everyone. So I should be okay.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 05:42 am
@Thomas,
Oh yeah, Thomas, you're a prince . . . and we all know it.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 06:41 am
@littlek,
littlek wrote:

Ooooohhh, corndogs are good too!


Ah! It seems we are all on the bandwagon with those fake corndogs.

Haven't had one in awhile, but they ARE delish!
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 06:45 am
@Thomas,
Seitan?

I'd never heard of it.
I'll have to check that out.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 06:50 am
@chai2,
ok, this looks really good (sweet and sour seitan)

http://www.thelmagazine.com/images/blogimages/2010/05/10/1273512406-seitan-sweet-and-sour.jpg




THIS looks like dog poo.

http://cdn.goodbite.com/sites/default/files/xmldump/PX-35590-seitan-photoopti.jpg

I would not use this second picture to convince a carnivore to try it.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 10:13 am
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Oh yeah, Thomas, you're a prince . . . and we all know it.

Well, that's good.
Dorothy Parker
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 10:15 am
@Thomas,
I heard that meat substitutes like Quorn cause thrush . Don't know if it's true but it would put me off if I was a veggie.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 10:20 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
Yes, sure, but ... as a foodie, how do you feel about meat imitations?


1. most of the the ones I've tried have been rather unpleasant (with one very significant exception - but the resto really only has two good dishes - not enough to make me go back there)
2. I don't recommend anyone have a diet high in corn or wheat
3. if people aren't eating meat, I don't see the point of having pretend meat. Really. It just seems stupid and pointless.
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 10:23 am
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:
3. if people aren't eating meat, I don't see the point of having pretend meat. Really. It just seems stupid and pointless.


agree
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2010 10:29 am
@ehBeth,
found it!

http://www.cbc.ca/ideas/episodes/2010/05/17/have-your-meat-and-eat-it-too-part-1-2-listen/

part 3 is the piece I was talking about


here is Michael Pollan, in 2002, on the farm featured in the CBC link

http://michaelpollan.com/articles-archive/sustaining-vision/



Quote:
Salatin showed me the barn, a ramshackle, open-sided structure where 100 head of cattle spend the winter, ever day consuming 25 pounds of hay and production 50 pounds of waste. Every few days, Salatin adds another layer of wood chips or straw or leaves to the bedding, building a manure layer cake that’s three feet thick by winter’s end. Each layer he lards with a little corn. All winter the cake composts, producing heat to warm the barn and fermenting the corn. Why corn? There’s nothing a pig likes more than 40-proof corn, and nothing he’s better equipped to do than root it out with his powerful snout. So as soon as the cows go out to pasture in March, the “pigaerators,” as Salatin calls them, are let loose in the barn, where they proceed systematically to turn the compost in their quest for an alcoholic morsel.

“That’s the sort of farm machinery I like—never needs its oil changed, appreciated over time, and when you’re done with it, you eat it.” Buried clear to their butts in compost, a bobbing sea of hams and corkscrew tails, these are the happiest pigs you’ll ever meet. Salatin reached down and brought a handful of compost to my nose; it smelled as sweet and warm as the forest floor in summertime, a miracle of transubstantiation. After the pigs have completed their alchemy, Salatin spreads the compost on the pastures. There, it will feed the grasses so that the grasses might again feed the cows, the cows the chickens, and so on until the snow falls, in one long, beautiful, and utterly convincing proof that, in a world where grass can eat sunlight and food animals can eat grass, there is indeed a free lunch.
 

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