23
   

If you are a low/no meat eater, how do you feel about meat imitations?

 
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 10:58 am
@failures art,
failures art wrote:
Somebody posts a recipe, and you, without trying it, say you bet it tastes like spakel. While I certainly can believe that such a thing is unappealing to you, there's no point in going out of your way to put it down.

In my capacity as armchair psychologist, I think Farmerman is uncomfortable with the fact that killing animals for food is a choice. Because he finds it hard to defend this choice as moral (unlike Setanta, who has no moral problem killing animals), he grasps at straws and ignores as much evidence as he can, hoping he can somehow pass off meat-eating as a necessity. I'm sensing cognitive dissonance on his part, and attribute much of the shallowness to this cognitive dissonance.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 11:26 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

Quote:
Somebody posts a recipe, and you, without trying it
Funny you should bring that up. We here at the Farmemrman test kitchens had just today purchased some of this Morning Star "Chicken " . This was done because most of my comments and discussions in this thread began with Thomas. You had sorta wedged in (not that Im complaining) but Thomas was talking real data and we here at the Farmerman test kitchens had to try the stuff that was made ffrom some sort of formed soy material.

On the topic of talking about real data, here's what I would consider a valid test for my conjecture that Seitan is a tastebud-friendly alternative to meat:
  1. Get a decent Vegan cookbook. (For example, I like the Candle Cafe Cookbook, avaliable on Amazon for less than thirteen bucks.)

  2. Make your own Seitan from scratch, following that cookbook's recipe. (The Candle Cafe Cookbook starts with whole wheat flour; others may start with vital wheat gluten flour.)

  3. Find a Seitan recipe that sounds the most tasty to you based on its preparation. (If necessary, imagine that chicken rather than Seitan was prepared in this way, and compare the recipes' tastiness on that basis.)

  4. Apply the recipe to the Seitan you just made, have the employees at Farmerman Test Kitchens try it, and judge the merits of Seitan by the taste of the meal.
If someone had started a thread about, say, Ethiopian cooking, you wouldn't have dismissed Ethiopian cuisine just because you didn't like the taste of some MREs made for the Ethiopian army. Instead, you would have gotten an Ethiopian cookbook, given it your best try, and reserved your judgment until the result of that try was in. It only seems fair that you should judge Vegan cooking using the same procedure. Once you've given it your best try and still don't like it, you've earned the standing to have your disparaging remarks taken seriously. But not until then.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 12:08 pm
@coluber2001,
coluber2001 wrote:
You mentioned buying 50 lbs of gluten flour for $100. Could you advise me on your source? Once again, thanks for the great idea.

Sorry for taking so long to respond. I hadn't been following this thread for a while. Here's my source. (Nothing special about it, found it through Google shopping.)

https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/food_storage/vital_wheat_gluten_honeyville.htm
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 12:27 pm
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
In my capacity as armchair psychologist, I think Farmerman is uncomfortable with the fact that killing animals for food is a choice. Because he finds it hard to defend this choice as moral (unlike Setanta, who has no moral problem killing animals


killing animals is a moral question?

crazy. man.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 12:27 pm
@Thomas,
Quote:
Once you've given it your best try and still don't like it, you've earned the standing to have your disparaging remarks taken seriously. But not until then.
Do you agree that the Morning STar "meatless meat" products taste pretty crappy?
ehBeth
 
  0  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 12:28 pm
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
Once you've given it your best try and still don't like it, you've earned the standing to have your disparaging remarks taken seriously. But not until then.


oh. I see.
you've assumed the high-moral mantle.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 12:42 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
Do you agree that the Morning STar "meatless meat" products taste pretty crappy?

I haven't tried them, but I'll take your word for it.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 12:42 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:
you've assumed the high-moral mantle.

You say that as if it was a bad thing.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 01:26 pm
@Thomas,
As near as I can tell, given their ho-hum complacency, FM and Setanta have no moral problem with killing humans.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  1  
Reply Mon 18 Oct, 2010 03:55 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
Do you agree that the Morning STar "meatless meat" products taste pretty crappy?


I think they taste pretty crappy only if you expect them to taste exactly like the real McCoy. I have the faux BBQ ribs once in a blue moon when I want a very fast, low fat, low calorie meal with a decent amount of protein. They aren't awful, but no one would mistake them for genuine, fat laden, pork or beef ribs. Same is true of the Boca burgers. And you have to be careful with both the ribs and burgers in the microwave--just heating them a few seconds too long really makes them tough, dry, and inedible. I wouldn't want to live on this stuff, but I don't mind it as an occasional convenience food.

I rarely eat meat now. I originally cut down mainly to control my cholesterol, and I just got out of the habit of preparing it on a regular basis, or even thinking about it much. But, when I crave a hamburger, I make myself a real beef burger, a Boca burger just won't cut it.

I've never tried the faux corn dogs, but given the enthusiasm I'm hearing in this thread, I'm going to look for them.
0 Replies
 
failures art
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Oct, 2010 12:47 pm
Quote:
Fear of a Vegetarian Planet: Why the Beef Industry Is Freaked Out By a Kids’ Contest
By Melanie Warner | October 14, 2010


In hopes of casting a more healthful glow on the much-maligned school lunch program, the USDA, along with Michelle Obama’s Let’s Move campaign, has launched a contest encouraging people to come up with creative vegetable, bean and whole grain recipes for kids. A fun, harmless PR exercise, right? Not to the beef industry, which is up in arms over the exclusion of meat in the recipe categories.

Kristina Butts, director of legislative affairs for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, complained to Beef Magazine that the contest sends the wrong message.

By excluding meat from its healthy kids recipe contest, USDA continues to add to the misconception that meat is over consumed in the U.S.

The fact that Butts even bothered to address this non-issue reveals just how sensitive large meat producers are to not only the idea that people should curtail meat consumption, but to any suggestion, no matter how innocuous, that Americans eat more non-meat items that might somehow knock meat off the plate. Who knew lentils could be so scary?

Butts went on to urge NCBA members to submit beef recipes even though the contest doesn’t call for them.

In its fear of all things vegetarian, the NCBA seems to be overlooking the fact that this is not a proposal for a rewrite of the billion dollar school lunch program. It’s a cute contest. The USDA is offering no guarantees that the winning non-meat recipe (they don’t even use the dreaded V word) will be included on any school lunch menus. The only thing the wining team can count on is that they will get to prepare their dish alongside White House chefs and receive a check for $3,000.

The beef industry has always been thin-skinned about anything that threatens to upend sales, and these days its members are even more on edge. In June, the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, which counsels the agency on its all-important dietary guidelines, had the gall to recommend that Americans “shift food intake patterns to a more plant-based diet that emphasizes vegetables, cooked dry beans and peas, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and seeds.” It sounds like common-sense advice, but for the USDA, which has been a longtime loyal ally in promoting meat consumption, it’s radical thinking.

Then there’s Bill Clinton’s revelation that he’s gone from a devoted carnivore to a vegan and the growing momentum of the Meatless Monday campaign, two things the meat industry can’t control. As to whether the NCBA and other meat groups still hold sway over at the USDA, we’ll get a glimpse of that when the updated dietary guidelines come out at the end of the year.




source with embedded links.

A
R
T
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Oct, 2010 01:41 pm
@failures art,
He said Kristina Butts
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Oct, 2010 01:52 pm
@failures art,
failures art wrote:
The beef industry has always been thin-skinned about anything that threatens to upend sales, and these days its members are even more on edge. In June, the USDA’s Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee, which counsels the agency on its all-important dietary guidelines, had the gall to recommend that Americans “shift food intake patterns to a more plant-based diet that emphasizes vegetables, cooked dry beans and peas, fruits, whole grains, nuts, and seeds.” It sounds like common-sense advice, but for the USDA, which has been a longtime loyal ally in promoting meat consumption, it’s radical thinking.

That sure explains some of the oddities in the USDA guidelines.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Oct, 2010 02:00 pm
Returning to the original question for the thread---"how do you feel about meat imitations?"---I tried smoked tempeh yesterday. In spite of its brand name---"Fakin' Bacon"---it's actually quite different from bacon except for the smoky flavor. That's because tempeh has a somewhat crumbly, granular texture completely different from that of bacon. Perhaps that's why I liked it---in contrast to the usual "vegetarian bacons", which I generally don't like. (They seem to be trying to hard to be the real thing, only to fail anyway.) Anyway, I used smoked tempeh in place of the "B" part in a BLT sandwich, and it worked well. I expect that it would also serve honorably in other dishes that use bacon as a spice---South German Krautsalat for example.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Oct, 2010 03:12 pm
@farmerman,
What's that 60s song with the line something like,

"she's one of the butts sisters, ummmmmm"
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Oct, 2010 05:38 am
@JTT,
I recall it but its waay back there. It was a country song with some talk over no?

Bertha Butt ws one of the sisters maybe I can find her on Facebook.


Today the country equivalent would be the girl with the "Honky Tonk Badonka Donk"
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Oct, 2010 10:26 am
@farmerman,
I think I found it. Remembered one other word and that helped in the google; troglodytes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VlRXQEA0yj0
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 07:41 pm
Although this thread was started as a question about meat imitations, I'd like to record an experience with a yoghurt imitation. I've been experimenting with almond yoghurt in my Müsli over the last week, and I'm pretty happy with it. (Almond yoghurt is Almond milk, brought into a vaguely gelatinous state with Apple pectin.) It doesn't taste quite as good as the real thing, but I'm greatly preferring it to soy yoghurt.
roger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 08:02 pm
@Thomas,
Imitation soy!
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Fri 17 Jun, 2011 08:08 pm
@aidan,
Quote:
I don't eat meat because I don't like it. It's only recently become a moral issue to me and that's since I've learned how much of the world's natural resources are squandered to raise cattle, sheep, lambs and pigs to feed people.
PUHLEEEEEZE. I thought we called a truce . Now Im gonna have to come back with this

ONLY ruminants and poultry can process grasses and leaves. Grass fed meat is actually the only way for you to ingest and process grass .




How about "Tofurkey"? is that a bunch of crap or what?
 

Related Topics

 
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 07/04/2020 at 06:59:02