0
   

bust moves to hip-hop music

 
 
Adverb
 
Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2010 09:10 pm
Hello
Could anyone help me?
What does"bust" mean in this phrase?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 1,261 • Replies: 17
No top replies

 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 23 Jul, 2010 09:50 pm
@Adverb,
Definitely need more context, A.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 12:46 am
Performing a dance movement is called "busting a move" by a certain segment of US English demotic speakers, mainly black (and white college kids) I think.

Joe Nation
 
  2  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 10:23 am
@contrex,
demotic (?)

Joe(what you talkin' about, Willis?)Nation
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 10:29 am
@Joe Nation,
It just means 'popular' or 'common' speech, Joe. There's nothing bad about it. It's groovy.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 10:59 am
@Joe Nation,
Yep. It's idiomatic or slang speak.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  0  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 12:34 pm
@Joe Nation,
Joe Nation wrote:

demotic (?)

Joe(what you talkin' about, Willis?)Nation


Don't they have Google down your way? (or dictionaries?)

de·motic (dē mät′ik)

adjective

1. of the people; popular; specif., vernacular (sense )
2. in or of idiomatic, colloquial, everyday language: a novelist with a good ear for demotic dialogue


Origin: ML demoticus < Gr dēmotikos < dēmotes, one of the people
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 12:46 pm
@contrex,
I think that it was covered adequately, Contrex.

The same or similar questions could, many times, be asked of you, an English teacher of what is it, 30 some years?

Don't you have a grammar book down your way?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 01:06 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Don't you have a grammar book down your way?


In what connection do you ask this?

JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 01:10 pm
@contrex,
In connection to the more than rare occasion where you made mistakes on the grammar of English.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 01:44 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

In connection to the more than rare occasion where you made mistakes on the grammar of English.


Yes, yes, I daresay (he said impatiently) but let's see some examples. THat's what I meant. Otherwise you're just farting smells out your ass (that's demotic). By the way, your post I quoted above has more than one error.

McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 01:45 pm

You mean mistakes in the grammar?

Quote:
mistakes on the grammar of English.


Gee whillikins, what an infelicitous phrase.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 01:59 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
Otherwise you're just farting smells out your ass (that's demotic).


Why not start with your observation that farting smells out your ass is demotic?

================

Google exact phrase search - English, no region specified

No results found for "farting smells out your ass".

-----------------------

Google exact phrase search - UK region only

No results found for "farting smells out your ass".

-------------------------

Google exact phrase search - US region only

No results found for "farting smells out your ass".

---------------

Google exact phrase search - Australia region only

No results found for "farting smells out your ass".

----------------

Possibly, you meant that it was demotic in New Zealand, or maybe, in your immediate family.

0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 02:02 pm
Once again JTT reveals what a pathetic dick he is.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 02:14 pm
@contrex,
That doesn't explain how you can contend that that phrase is in any way, demotic, Contrex.

Nor does it explain the "more than one errors" in my previous post.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 02:31 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

That doesn't explain how you can contend that that phrase is in any way, demotic, Contrex.

Nor does it explain the "more than one errors" in my previous post.


Your stupidity explains the errors in your previous post.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 02:53 pm
@contrex,
Hmmm, an English teacher of how many years again, Contrex? For a "teacher", you have an awfully funny way of explaining your ideas on language.

Let me suggest that a teacher shouldn't use big words, like 'demotic', when that teacher doesn't have a decent grasp of the meaning of such words.

Let me also suggest that if a teacher of 35 years hasn't brought himself up to speed on the grammar of the target language, perhaps it's time to consider retirement or maybe alternate work, something that better reflects your abilities.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jul, 2010 03:24 pm
@JTT,
JTT wrote:

Hmmm, an English teacher of how many years again, Contrex? For a "teacher", you have an awfully funny way of explaining your ideas on language.


1. I'm retired now: I can do what I like.

Quote:
Let me suggest that a teacher shouldn't use big words, like 'demotic', when that teacher doesn't have a decent grasp of the meaning of such words.


How is my grasp deficient?

Quote:
Let me also suggest that if a teacher of 35 years hasn't brought himself up to speed on the grammar of the target language, perhaps it's time to consider retirement or maybe alternate work, something that better reflects your abilities.


Like I'd take your career advice, dimbulb.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » bust moves to hip-hop music
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 10/17/2021 at 06:08:24