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Dr Doolittle

 
 
Reply Mon 14 Jun, 2010 05:36 pm

Do animals have a language?

Can humans translate or speak it?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,332 • Replies: 13
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talk72000
 
  2  
Reply Mon 14 Jun, 2010 07:44 pm
@sometime sun,
They do have a rudimentary language that warns of dangers e.g. Crows warn each others and listen to your dog when alone it whines.
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Mon 14 Jun, 2010 07:48 pm
Here is proof of a language, with the translation...

JTT
 
  2  
Reply Mon 14 Jun, 2010 10:43 pm
@sometime sun,
I can get the coyotes to reply to me but they're probably just saying, "Jesus, another bloody foreigner. Listen to that accent, will ya!"
sometime sun
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 11:44 am
@talk72000,
Do you think they have accent?
sometime sun
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 11:48 am
@chai2,
That is one of the cutest, funniest things I have seen in a long time.
Thanks you so much.
(beaming sun smile)
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sometime sun
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 11:50 am
@JTT,
This was also funny.
You guys seem to have a very healthy sense of humour here, maybe I will be able to start training mine, thanks.
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dagmaraka
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 11:51 am
Animals do have accents. Ducks at least.

source: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article89588.ece

IT might sound quackers but researchers reckon DUCKS have regional accents.
It seems the waterbirds in London have a much rougher and louder call than their West Country counterparts.
Cockney ducks have developed loud, more abrasive quacks because of competing noises of city life, like sirens, horns, trains and traffic.
But their laidback equivalents in Cornwall sound much less aggressive.
Dr Victoria de Rijke made the discovery after ducks were recorded at Spitalfields City Farm, East London, and Trerieve Farm in Downderry, Cornwall.
The quacks were analysed and compared using special computer software.
Dr de Rijke said yesterday: “We found definite regional differences.
“The Cockney ducks were much louder and vocally excitable.
“The Cornish ducks made longer and more relaxed sounds ? much more chilled out.
“The Cockney quack is like a shout and a laugh whereas Cornish ducks sound more like they are giggling.”
Dr de Rijke led the research at Middlesex University, where she is a principal lecturer in English which includes the study of phonetics.
She added: “Ideally I would like to continue this theme and study Geordie, Scouse and even Irish ducks to see the differences in their sounds.”


Read more: http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/article89588.ece#ixzz0qwfTc3yh
Pemerson
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 12:30 pm
See my avatar, right there. That's Nixey, and she talks all the time. She has differing meows, some with 3 syllabels. Anytime I see her about the house, laying in all her many beds, I say meow. She says meow, adds another sound with it, then I repeat that. She says another and I repeat that. That kitty's mouth is always open. Hope she lives forever.

About an hour ago I took my miniature dashound out on the picnic for a nail trim. He screams, tucks his toes under him, screams some more, all the while I'm kissing him, telling him it's all OK, handing him small treats. This went on for 5, 10 minutes. Finally, the white cat, Josephine, came from under the deck and shouted a MEOW. When I quit she went back under the deck, irritated.

But, then, I treat my pets, talk to them, as if they are human. The cats always greet the dogs with a nose touch anytime they pass.

Animals are people, too.
sometime sun
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 12:49 pm
@Pemerson,
That is a good point, do you think humans have added to animal language and could give them new meaning or understanding they would not have had were it not for the human tutorial?
Pemerson
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 01:57 pm
@sometime sun,
I have this thought that animals have always had abilities that humans took no notice of, instead thinking they were totally without awareness of who and what they are or what they are capable of. It's only in past several decades that humans have decided to make their pets possible partners instead of things kept in the yard, on a chain, or sitting in our lap for our amusement. I think the change (in our thinking) occurred with the British woman's TV show where she supposedly read the minds of people's pets, followed by several dog whisperers, and of course the entire horse world literally lived and breathed the natural horsemanship training.

In about 1987 I quit my job (because I could, I guess) went home to our new little farm and lived and breathed animals for about 7 years. We always had at least two horses and a pony, 3 dogs, lots of cats, but eventually kept a goat (funniest thing), a duck, and whatever else showed up. I always talked with those animals, watched them, listened to them, just loved them.

I think animals grow from a human's love, become attached to us, and begin to "sense" us in different ways. They become more intelligent, as would anybody who is loved, respected and given a chance to prove it. Now, you see, we are being rewarded! They are not only our eyes today, but our ears as well, and "know" when their owners are about to have seizures, strokes, or even die, to say nothing of the fun games we play with them.

If nothing else, humanity has redeemed itself in raising the consciousness of animals. Maybe some would think this, but, I say that animals have also raised our consciousness so we understand how they can teach us as well.



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Pemerson
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 02:01 pm
@chai2,
That video was too precious. Thank you.
0 Replies
 
sometime sun
 
  1  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 02:11 pm
@dagmaraka,
Thank you so much for your information it is very valuable.
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  2  
Reply Tue 15 Jun, 2010 03:01 pm
@sometime sun,
They do. I read an article about. Another articles shows either cats or dogs brought in a say German home will not or cannot understand commands form an English person.

Babies also seem to pick up the accent in their mothers' wombs. They respond to the accent they they were 'incubated' in more than a foreign one.
0 Replies
 
 

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