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The Great Gulf of Mexico Oil Spewage Thread

 
 
Reply Wed 5 May, 2010 09:26 am
I have been following this story recently, and it seems that nothing good will likely come from this catastrophe other than, hopefully, some corporate accountability.

Random news stories.

t r u t h o u t | Spread of Gulf Oil Spill Puts Fragile Louisiana Coast on Alert

t r u t h o u t | Current Timeline to Shut Down Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill: Three Months

BP Oil Leak May Soar 12-Fold If Dome-Cap Plan Fails (Update2) - BusinessWeek

President Obama may change mind about offshore drilling rigs following Gulf of Mexico oil spill

Coast Guard: BP caps 1 of 3 oil leaks - Environment- msnbc.com

Here is some info on British Petroleum that they would rather not have most people know.

BP Oil Spill: 7 Secrets BP Doesn't Want You To Know (PHOTOS)
 
xris
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2010 09:44 am
@Theaetetus,
I dont want to even watch the news, its too disturbing. O how I wish we were not so dependant on the damned stuff. BP need to be punished.
Pangloss
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2010 12:23 pm
@xris,
Theaetetus;160394 wrote:

Here is some info on British Petroleum that they would rather not have most people know.

BP Oil Spill: 7 Secrets BP Doesn't Want You To Know (PHOTOS)


I agree with what the most recent commenter said on this article:

"kinda misleading headline there, guys.
b.p. does not have secrets they do not want you to know.
they do not care if you know, because they know that nothing will happen to them if you do know.
americans have proven over and over that they will not give up their oil habit, and they are proving it again right now. knowing how bad this mess is for the gulf states, the 'drill, baby, drill' faction is calling for more offshore drilling, because after all, s**t happens."

BP has been notorious over the years for environmental problems and violations. I know it's not going to make one bit of difference, but I'm not buying their stuff anymore. They have succeeded in brainwashing the public to believe that they are the most "green" company out there, yet they've flooded our coast with oil, and it's not the first time. It's time to move beyond the multi-million dollar wrist slaps and hand out some real punishment...but it won't happen.

Boycott BP | Facebook

xris;160404 wrote:
I dont want to even watch the news, its too disturbing. O how I wish we were not so dependant on the damned stuff. BP need to be punished.


"To a philosopher, all news is gossip, and those who edit and read it are old women over their tea..." - Thoreau
fast
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2010 01:18 pm
@Pangloss,
Something good ... for some.
0 Replies
 
Pangloss
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 May, 2010 02:54 pm
@Theaetetus,
You can't count on the government to do anything about this, but there will be a whole lot of angry gulf coast property owners and businessmen filing suit for the ensuing damages from this mess. It's either that, or take BP's customary $5k payoff in exchange for avoiding litigation. :rolleyes:
0 Replies
 
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 08:05 am
@Theaetetus,
He is an interesting article on the how BP was largely responsible for the severity of the Exxon Valdez spill.

Greg Palast wrote:

That's because responding to a spill may be easy and simple, but not at all cheap. And BP is cheap. Deadly cheap.


To contain a spill, the main thing you need is a lot of rubber, long skirts of it called a "boom." Quickly surround a spill, leak or burst, then pump it out into skimmers, or disperse it, sink it or burn it. Simple.

But there's one thing about the rubber skirts: you've got to have lots of them at the ready, with crews on standby in helicopters and on containment barges ready to roll. They have to be in place round the clock, all the time, just like a fire department, even when all is operating A-O.K. Because rapid response is the key. In Alaska, that was BP's job, as principal owner of the pipeline consortium Alyeska. It is, as well, BP's job in the Gulf, as principal lessee of the deepwater oil concession.

Before the Exxon Valdez grounding, BP's Alyeska group claimed it had these full-time, oil spill response crews. Alyeska had hired Alaskan natives, trained them to drop from helicopters into the freezing water and set booms in case of emergency. Alyeska also certified in writing that a containment barge with equipment was within five hours sailing of any point in the Prince William Sound. Alyeska also told the state and federal government it had plenty of boom and equipment cached on Bligh Island.
But it was all a lie. On that March night in 1989 when the Exxon Valdez hit Bligh Reef in the Prince William Sound, the BP group had, in fact, not a lick of boom there. And Alyeska had fired the natives who had manned the full-time response teams, replacing them with phantom crews, lists of untrained employees with no idea how to control a spill. And that containment barge at the ready was, in fact, laid up in a drydock in Cordova, locked under ice, 12 hours away.

As a result, the oil from the Exxon Valdez, which could have and should have been contained around the ship, spread out in a sludge tide that wrecked 1,200 miles of shoreline.


t r u t h o u t | Slick Operator: The BP I've Known Too Well


Here is a nice summary of the oil spewage from the New York Times.

Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill (2010) - The New York Times

And here is a nice animation on how the oil spill has spread over time.

Tracking the Oil Spill - Interactive Map - NYTimes.com
0 Replies
 
Pangloss
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 12:07 pm
@Theaetetus,
Hopefully this latest incident will finally convince them that it is too risky, from a financial standpoint, for their operations to continue in this haphazard manner. We can also partly thank Dick Cheney for shutting down legislation on making an automatic shut-off switch mandatory in oil rigs...you'd think the companies would want this switch for their own benefit, but I guess it's more expensive than just losing 50k gallons into the ocean.
kennethamy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 12:11 pm
@Pangloss,
Pangloss;160863 wrote:
Hopefully this latest incident will finally convince them that it is too risky, from a financial standpoint, for their operations to continue in this haphazard manner. We can also partly thank Dick Cheney for shutting down legislation on making an automatic shut-off switch mandatory in oil rigs...you'd think the companies would want this switch for their own benefit, but I guess it's more expensive than just losing 50k gallons into the ocean.


What makes you think that they operated in a haphazard manner? Because something went wrong? How about the many more times that things went right? Were they operating haphazardly then too?
Pangloss
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 May, 2010 12:15 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;160866 wrote:
What makes you think that they operated in a haphazard manner? Because something went wrong? How about the many more times that things went right? Were they operating haphazardly then too?


If you actually care, and I sincerely doubt that you do, you can look up BP's long list of environmental and safety violations, and the fines paid as a result. Then make up your own mind.
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2010 03:35 am
@Theaetetus,
Here are some recent articles on the oil spewage.

Map and Estimates of Oil Spilled in the Gulf of Mexico - Interactive Map - NYTimes.com

10 Things You Need (But Don't Want) To Know About the BP Oil Spill | Environment | AlterNet

Deepwater Horizon's ill-fated oil well could have been handled more carefully, hearings reveal | NOLA.com

Photographers Say BP Restricts Access to Oil Spill - Newsweek

http://www.politicolnews.com/epa-covered-for-bp-oil-in-2006-investigation/

Feds weigh a criminal probe of BP - Los Angeles Times

Parish official: BP shipped in workers for president's visit - CNN.com
0 Replies
 
Victor Eremita
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2010 04:01 am
@Theaetetus,
Ah yes, top kill didn't work; more disaster for the Gulf
0 Replies
 
Soul Brother
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2010 04:37 am
@xris,
xris;160404 wrote:
I dont want to even watch the news, its too disturbing. O how I wish we were not so dependant on the damned stuff. BP need to be punished.


I agree with this, what is happening is absolutely disgusting.
But what disgusts me even more is that this has happened countless of times yet we still fail to learn from history. I really wander what the consequences will be for bp and future laws.

---------- Post added 05-30-2010 at 08:44 PM ----------

kennethamy;160866 wrote:
What makes you think that they operated in a haphazard manner? Because something went wrong? How about the many more times that things went right? Were they operating haphazardly then too?


yes but this is not important is it ken? what does it matter that haphazard is not the correct word? you are pointing out an unimportant error of wording and you are totally missing the point that what matters is the catastrophe that is the oil spill would you disagree?
0 Replies
 
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2010 03:02 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;160866 wrote:
What makes you think that they operated in a haphazard manner? Because something went wrong? How about the many more times that things went right? Were they operating haphazardly then too?


As someone that works for a corporation, and has to deal with safety and maintenance issues, I can say that it would be nearly impossible that BP did not know that their equipment was sh!t. But I also know that many safety and maintenance logs are totally fabricated since that is really all that is necessary to pass the regulators. As long as no one is hurt or no equipment fails, then there is no reason for concern.

In BP's case though, they have a long history of negligence. And even a month after the spill, they continue to deceive the public on the dangers and hazards that they caused as well as on their progress on their clean up and repairs. If there is any corporation that should be shut down and liquidated off, BP is it since they have proved time and time again that as long as they are profitable, their caused disasters are merely a minor business costs. Considering the people of the world kick in for the true costs of BP's product, they should no longer be able to operate in the public realm, and the public is stupid for allowing it.
0 Replies
 
kennethamy
 
  0  
Reply Sun 30 May, 2010 03:06 pm
@Pangloss,
Pangloss;160868 wrote:
If you actually care, and I sincerely doubt that you do, you can look up BP's long list of environmental and safety violations, and the fines paid as a result. Then make up your own mind.


I still wonder about all the times when nothing untoward happens. Don't you? However, Obama has already panicked (doesn't take much) and has begun to place restrictions on off-shore drilling. Now, on-shore drilling is far less apt to go wrong. Are you in favor of increasing on-shore drilling? (I didn't think so). In any case, the Chinese, the Cubans, the Brazilians, will take up the slack, I am sure. They are lucky. They don't have an Obama as a president.
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 12:42 pm
@Theaetetus,
Six Things To Do About the BP Gulf Disaster — YES! Magazine

A Good list of demands that citizens should make in the eye of the Not-so-Great Gulf of Mexico Oil Spewage.

Quote:

1. The federal government needs to take charge and put BP under temporary receivership as recommended by former Labor Secretary Robert Reich. BP was dishonest about the quantities of oil flowing into the Gulf, and their initial repair efforts have failed. The federal government is accountable to the American people, and it needs to decide what to do to protect our nation's water, wildlife, and shorelines of the Gulf (and wherever else the oil travels). As Reich argues, receivership would allow the government to act with full authority and accountability, and to call on all the expertise available (not just BP's) to help make the difficult calls.

2. The cleaning and protection of coastlines needs to be ramped up. Whether that means hiring more local fishers, bringing in National Guard troops, or deploying citizen brigades on the beaches, the response needs to be aggressive and sustained. Even if the oil stopped flowing today, the contamination would continue washing up in sensitive coastal regions for months or longer. All workers should have training, equipment, and protective gear to keep them from being sickened by the oil and the toxic dispersants.

3. There should be generous pay for the armies of bird-rescuers and beach cleaners, and those out protecting shorelines with boats and booms. Families who are the immediate victims of the disaster should get first crack at the jobs, and their wages will help sustain the region through this economic storm. Charge BP (and any other companies responsible for the disaster) the full costs for as long as it takes to get this region clean, whether it's months or years.

4. Use the least toxic chemical dispersants and insist on full disclosure of the makeup of all the dispersants being dumped into the Gulf. The U.S. EPA should determine which dispersants, if any, are used based on the long-term health of the Gulf and its shorelines and estuaries, not based on which companies have ties with BP or which chemicals will be most likely to hide the effects and protect BP from embarrassing images of oil slicks. Use emergency powers, if necessary, to get a full disclosure of the makeup of the dispersants from BP or whoever is refusing to release it. Without this information, there's no way to keep the emergency responders safe, to properly treat stricken birds and sea life, and to assess the long-term damage.

5. Boycott BP, but also other oil companies. They are all spilling oil (see what Shell is doing in Nigeria, for example), and causing direct environmental damage. But using oil, no matter what company pumps it, is putting our entire planet at risk through disruption of the climate. Melting ice caps, changing rainfall patterns, mega-storms and failing crops are already happening, but that is only the beginning if we start hitting climate tipping points. We must kick our fossil fuel addiction. This is our part of the solution.

6. Begin a massive conversion to energy efficiency and renewable energy. There is a lot of blame to go around for this disaster, from the practice of putting cronies in charge of regulation to the corporate culture of putting profits above all else. But this disaster is above all happening because the oil that is easy to get to is already taken. Now oil companies are trying to get the oil that's hard to reach, from deep under the oceans, from hostile regions of the world, and from dirty and destructive sources like tar sands. We've entered a time that analyst and author Michael Klare calls "The Age of Tough Oil," and the costs-human, environmental, economic, and strategic-are rising with each new barrel. Making our economy more energy efficient and building a renewable energy infrastructure offer immediate benefits in terms of jobs and economic stimulus and will sustain generations to come.
0 Replies
 
Night Ripper
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 01:07 pm
@kennethamy,
kennethamy;170950 wrote:
In any case, the Chinese...


Really? China is going to be drilling off our shores? I hope not! Perhaps you meant that they would be drilling off their own shores? If that's what you meant and if China wants to drill off their own shores and pollute their coastline then they are welcome to it.
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 11:06 am
The latest disturbing story I have seen coming out of the gulf coast about British Petroleum.

Quote:
"Journalists struggling to document the impact of the oil rig explosion have repeatedly found themselves turned away from public areas affected by the spill, and not only by BP and its contractors, but by local law enforcement, the Coast Guard and government officials," wrote Jeremy W. Peters for the New York Times. "To some critics of the response effort by BP and the government, instances of news media being kept at bay are just another example of a broader problem of officials' filtering what images of the spill the public sees. Scientists, too, have complained about the trickle of information that has emerged from BP and government sources. Three weeks passed, for instance, from the time the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded on April 20 and the first images of oil gushing from an underwater pipe were released by BP."

http://www.truth-out.org/four-ways-bp-and-officials-are-working-suppress-outrageous-facts-about-gulf-disaster60519
0 Replies
 
xris
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 11:28 am
Just one question..Is America going to insist it companies pay the same amount to the Nigerians in compensation for the oil spills, American companies have bee responsible for?
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 12:10 pm
@Night Ripper,
Night Ripper wrote:
Really? China is going to be drilling off our shores? I hope not! Perhaps you meant that they would be drilling off their own shores? If that's what you meant and if China wants to drill off their own shores and pollute their coastline then they are welcome to it.


Cuba is negotiating a lease with China for offshore oil exploration, and it's possible that China could end up drilling closer to U.S. shores than America currently allows in its offshore waters.


0 Replies
 
Theaetetus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Jun, 2010 01:14 pm
@xris,
Of course not. That is not the way corporations do business, and that is so far out of sight for American people that they do not know about the issues with the oil industry in Nigeria (Shell in this case I believe) or just don't care.
0 Replies
 
 

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