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DO THAY CELEBRATE PEARL HARBOR DAY IN JAPAN??

 
 
Reply Tue 1 Jun, 2010 01:09 am

DO THAY CELEBRATE PEARL HARBOR DAY IN JAPAN??


I was just wondering
what thay do on a date that will live in infamy.
 
failures art
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Jun, 2010 01:26 am
Oh my, no David. They do not. Perish Perish Perish the thought.

A
R
They do eat KFC on Christmas though...?
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jun, 2010 01:34 am
@failures art,
Thanx for the information, F.

I 'd eat it on any day, tho,
except Thanksgiving





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 05:38 am

I know that thay usually do a little something
to commemorate August 6th, but I did not know whether or not thay did anything for Dec. 7th.
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 06:08 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
DO THAY CELEBRATE PEARL HARBOR DAY IN JAPAN??


Do we celebrate Pearl Harbor day in America? I don't think I've ever heard of it until now.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 06:22 am
@maporsche,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
DO THAY CELEBRATE PEARL HARBOR DAY IN JAPAN??
maporsche wrote:
Do we celebrate Pearl Harbor day in America? I don't think I've ever heard of it until now.
I put out the Flag.

For the Japs, it was a military victory.


(In my personal opinion, it was not worth it.)
Bella Dea
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 06:38 am
We don't celebrate it and I'm sure that they don't either. We don't celebrate D-Day. It's not something to be proud of. I'm pretty certain none of those guys would have preferred to be there, on that beach, instead of at home during peace time. It was just something they had to do and they did it. Ask any veteran if they celebrate their "victories" and I'll bet you'd be hard pressed to find any one who celebrates what they had to do.

Which is the biggest reason, IMO, that we should honor these people. They did/do what most of us could never do. They put aside many of their own values to do what is necessary to protect and defend our right to sit here on our asses at our computers.

No, I doubt anyone in their right mind celebrates war.
0 Replies
 
failures art
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 07:06 am
@OmSigDAVID,
We don't really like being called "Japs." Many worse things in life to be called I suppose.

A
R
T
djjd62
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 07:11 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
For the Japs, it was a military victory.



what did seemingly entitled young american jewish women have to do with it?


0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  -1  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 07:16 am
@failures art,
failures art wrote:
We don't really like being called "Japs." Many worse things in life to be called I suppose.


A
R
T
WE did not really like being called TARGETS.

Its only an abbrieviation.
Everyone is rightfully entitled to use an abbrieviation,
such as if someone calls me "Dave" instead of David,
I will not get bent out of shape about it. I don't care much.

I did not allege that the Japs r bad.
Indeed, thay have a lot justly to be proud of.
I bear them no ill will, as of now.

Since u bring it up:
WHAT, exactly, is your objection to abbrieviations??
Seems irrational.





David
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  4  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 07:37 am
David, it's not an abbreviation.

It's a derogatory term used during the war.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 07:57 am
@Bella Dea,
Bella Dea wrote:

David, it's not an abbreviation.

It's a derogatory term used during the war.
I must respectfully disagree, Bella.
It does not attribute negative qualities to them.
In order to be derogatory,
it woud have to allege something BAD about them.

" ab·bre·vi·a·tion   "noun
1. a shortened or contracted form of a word or phrase,
used to represent the whole, as Dr. for Doctor, U.S. for United States, lb. for pound.
2. an act of abbreviating; state or result of being abbreviated;
reduction in length, duration, etc.; abridgment."





David
engineer
 
  4  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 08:40 am
@OmSigDAVID,
For a name to be negative, it only needs to develop a negative connotation in every day usage. What's the functional difference between "nigger" and "negro" other than connotation? "Jap" has a negative connotation from WWII. Obviously, you can use whatever term you want, but many find "Jap" to be offensive and you should be aware that if you use it, you are offending people. If that is not your intention, you could find a different term. If that is your intention, then at least you aren't ignorant of the meaning.

As you pointed out, the Japanese hold memorial services in August, much as we do in December. We don't celebrate VE day or VJ day and they don't celebrate Pearl Harbor day. Was there a particular reason you asked?
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 08:44 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Here is list of Japanese holidays.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Wed 2 Jun, 2010 10:32 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:
For a name to be negative, it only needs to develop a negative connotation in every day usage.
What's the functional difference between "nigger" and "negro" other than connotation?


"Jap" has a negative connotation
Will u reveal what that connotation IS ?

I 'd like to know that.







engineer wrote:
from WWII. Obviously, you can use whatever term you want, but many find "Jap" to be offensive
and you should be aware that if you use it, you are offending people.
If that is not your intention, you could find a different term.
If that is your intention, then at least you aren't ignorant of the meaning.
As I said, its like Dave and David.
It does not purport to be an indication of quality.
Truth be told, I earnestly admire the Japs for some of their qualities.

Even during the war itself, some of our troops admired them for their personal bravery in battle.
I don t bear them ill will, but I retain my right to use abbreviations. That is not an insult, except in fantasy.






engineer wrote:
As you pointed out, the Japanese hold memorial services in August, much as we do in December.
We don't celebrate VE day or VJ day
We certainly HAVE celebrated both of them, tho not recently. Some of us still put out the Flag.



engineer wrote:
and they don't celebrate Pearl Harbor day.
Was there a particular reason you asked?
Inquiring minds want to know.
engineer
 
  7  
Reply Thu 3 Jun, 2010 06:19 am
@OmSigDAVID,
"Dave" and "David" are equal to you because you don't care either way, but I know some Davids who really dislike the use of Dave. So the first time I call him Dave and he corrects me saying my name is "David", no harm. I didn't know and they corrected me. The next time I call him "Dave", I am being an ass. I know he doesn't like it and I'm doing it anyway. Do you disagree with that? Do you think I am just maintaining my "right" to call him by an abbreviation of my chosing? You are implying a right to call anyone by any name you choose regardless of how they feel about it. You do have the right of free speech, but to continue to call someone a name they find insulting doesn't make you a defender of language rights, it just make you a jerk.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jun, 2010 01:35 pm
@engineer,
engineer wrote:
"Dave" and "David" are equal to you because you don't care either way, but I know some Davids who really dislike the use of Dave. So the first time I call him Dave and he corrects me saying my name is "David", no harm. I didn't know and they corrected me. The next time I call him "Dave", I am being an ass.
I know he doesn't like it and I'm doing it anyway.

Do you disagree with that?
Yes; u are within your rights to use abbreviations. He has no authority to change that.
Try it this way: if someone with a long Russian or Eastern European name demands of u
that u go thru the trouble of saying it fully,
he has no rightful authority to subject u to that. U can choose to do it easy way that he dislikes
or the long hard way that he likes.



engineer wrote:
Do you think I am just maintaining my "right" to call him by an abbreviation of my chosing?
Yes; exercising it.


engineer wrote:
You are implying a right to call anyone by any name you choose regardless of how they feel about it. You do have the right of free speech, but to continue to call someone a name they find insulting doesn't make you a defender of language rights,
it just make you a jerk.
IF u wanna give him what he wants,
u can DO that (the same as if he demands to borrow money),
but there is no moral imperative to do it.

U don 't owe it to him.
If u dispute, and if u allege that u DO owe it to him,
then I 'll wanna know about the ORIGIN of that debt.





David
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Sat 5 Jun, 2010 02:36 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
You consider someone asking that they be called by his name the same as him demanding to borrow money? Sorry, I don't see that. It is common courtesy to call someone by his name. If he has a difficult name and chooses to shorten it, then great, but you deciding "I'll just call you Bubba because I can't be troubled" seems extremely rude to me.
OmSigDAVID
 
  0  
Reply Sun 6 Jun, 2010 01:55 am
@engineer,
engineer wrote:
You consider someone asking that they be called by his name
the same as him demanding to borrow money?
Yes; in BOTH cases, u can freely DO it, if u wanna,
but in NEITHER case do u owe that to him.






engineer wrote:
Sorry, I don't see that.
It is common courtesy to call someone by his name.
That addresses the relative proportionate incidence of its occurance, not not its morality.

During the 1930s (1937 forward) and 1940s, it was very "common" as u put it,
to add adjectives to their name (damn Japs, sneaky Japs, dirty Japs, sadistic Japs).

U can freely tell us your opinion of whether the commoness of that was right or rong.





engineer wrote:
If he has a difficult name and chooses to shorten it, then great,
but you deciding "I'll just call you Bubba because I can't be troubled" seems extremely rude to me.
I will concede your right to be the arbiter of your own opinion,
but I fail to see that we owe the obligation that u allege that we owe, to ANYONE, not just the Japs.

If a Greek has a long and difficult name,
we may take steps to ease the burden on ourselves
with an abbreviation or a nickname; SOMETHING to ease the discomfort.

In the case of the Japs, it is only a matter of shortening.
We are within our rights to DO that
yet I harbor respect and admiration for some of their qualities.
That admiration does NOT curtail nor encroach upon my right to use an abbreviation
and I do not relinquish that right.





David
engineer
 
  3  
Reply Sun 6 Jun, 2010 06:16 am
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:

engineer wrote:
Sorry, I don't see that.
It is common courtesy to call someone by his name.
That addresses the relative proportionate incidence of its occurance, not not its morality.

During the 1930s (1937 forward) and 1940s, it was very "common" as u put it,
to add adjectives to their name (damn Japs, sneaky Japs, dirty Japs, sadistic Japs).

I noticed you focused on "common", not "courtesy". As you point out, you don't have to be polite, you have free speech. But I'll bet you when you go out with your wife to meet another couple you don't just assign them nicknames. I can't envision this conversation:

"David, this is Jennifer. "
"Hello Jenny"
"Hello David, I go by Jennifer"
"Jennifer is just to hard, I'll call you Jenny"
(Jenny to her date) "This guy is a complete ass"

Do you call Italians "guidos"? Jews "goys"? Use "gooks" for Asians? Call Muslims "hajis"? It's pretty passive-aggressive to intentionally call someone a name they find insulting then claim some universal right of language to cover yourself. Free speech may allow you to call people anything you want, but if you want to offend someone, be adult enough to just offend them instead of hiding behind some pretext to justify your action.
 

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