5
   

problem with AND

 
 
tintin
 
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 09:38 pm


can we use comma while using "and" ?

For example:

Look at this two structures .

xxxxxxxxx , and xxxxxxxxxxxx .....(1)

xxxxxxxxx and xxxxxxxxxxxxx ........(2)


is (1) wrong sentence structure ? or its a valid one ? I know (2) ....what I don't know is whether we can use (1) .

Could you please clarify the details
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 2,604 • Replies: 17
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oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 09:45 pm
@tintin,
pause for effect or meaning
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 10:07 pm
@tintin,
You've probably got a compound subject and don't need a comma. Like:

Bob and Harry went home.

Bob and Harry and Tom went home.

On the other hand, if you are listing people or things, use the comma.

Bob, Harry, and Tom went home.

0 Replies
 
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 May, 2010 11:33 pm
It's ambiguous what you mean by xxxx... in your example. If each is a sentence by itself, and the "and" links them, then you use a comma, "Bob, Harry and Tom went to the movies, and they had a good time." (I learned to put a comma after each item in a list--"Bob, Harry, Tom, and George". Later a different pedant said you're not supposed to put one after the one just before the "and"--"Bob, Harry, Tom and George"--do whichever you want).
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 01:43 pm
Roger wrote:
On the other hand, if you are listing people or things, use the comma.

Bob, Harry, and Tom went home.


Usually we omit the last comma thus:

Bob, Harry and Tom went home.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 01:47 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

Roger wrote:
On the other hand, if you are listing people or things, use the comma.

Bob, Harry, and Tom went home.


Usually we omit the last comma thus:

Bob, Harry and Tom went home.




I concur.
Mame
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 02:07 pm
@chai2,
I was taught not to omit that last comma, not that it really matters, but it's because of phrases like: 'peanut butter and jam', as in I had tea, toast, and peanut butter and jam (they go together, like ham and eggs). There are 11 rules of commas, for those who care, and that's one of them.

Smile
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 02:24 pm
@Mame,
Ah, but tintin was not using a phrase like ham and eggs.

I just looked up the 11 rules, and it states that the "and" takes place of the comma.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 02:36 pm
@tintin,
You should stop tagging Politics for your English learning posts.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 02:45 pm
@talk72000,
talk72000 wrote:

You should stop tagging Politics for your English learning posts.


It says "Not Politics" Dopey.
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 03:07 pm
@chai2,
It still hangs in Politics forum.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 08:18 pm
@talk72000,
Quote:
You should stop tagging Politics for your English learning posts.


I would suppose there's a chance it's done to try to prevent various and sundry idiots from making political comments on questions of language comprehension/English/grammar.
0 Replies
 
tintin
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 May, 2010 09:24 pm
Thanks a lot guys . That was a hell lot of information . good lesson.

Thanks for your time.
0 Replies
 
mockingbird
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2010 09:44 am
@tintin,
One other thing to note: if you have two independent clauses (two phrases that could be sentences on their own) in the second structure, your sentence is a run-on. The ", and" construction prevents run-on sentences while allowing you to fully connect your ideas (you could also use a semicolon, though without the and). Example: Goldilocks sat in the first chair, and it was too big.
0 Replies
 
Deckland
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2010 01:00 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

Ah, but tintin was not using a phrase like ham and eggs.

I just looked up the 11 rules, and it states that the "and" takes place of the comma.

F U N E M ?
S I F M
F U N E X ?
S I F X
M N X 4 2 PLEASE
0 Replies
 
KrisBlueNZ
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 02:01 pm
@tintin,
The comma before the AND is called the Oxford comma or serial comma. Some people use it, some don't; it's a style issue really.

There are special cases, like the "tea, toast, and peanut butter and jam" case, where the meaning is confused if you use a comma before the last AND.

"I had tea and cake, cheese and crackers[,] and toast and jam"

The comma in brackets is the serial comma.
The other ANDs are not part of the "a, b[,] and c" structure, so they don't have a comma before them (and using one would look totally wrong).
In this case, where there are lots of ANDs in the sentence, the serial comma gives it a rhythm that emphasises the intended meaning, so I would always use it in those cases.

"I had tea, cake[,] and toast"

In this simple case, the serial comma adds a pause before the AND, which doesn't seem to clarify the meaning, so I omit it for brevity, but ultimately it is a style issue.
0 Replies
 
PUNKEY
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2010 02:04 pm
While reading all these posts, and at the same time making dinner, I really learned alot.
0 Replies
 
basenpat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 06:51 am
@tintin,
for 2 clauses, we have to use comma before AND.
AND is a kind of Coordinating conjunction.
Example:
I like apples.
I want oranges.
* I like apples, and I want oranges (the two ideas have equal importance)

I like apples.
I like oranges.
* I like apples and oranges. (2 objects but only one idea)

=]
0 Replies
 
 

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