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primary suggestion

 
 
tintin
 
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 11:36 am
Please see this text ...

The primary suggestion that the author of this article argues in support of is fining those who do not recycle in order to pay recycling collectors more for their work.

what does argue means ?

it seems to me this word has several meaning . I confuse this.
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ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 11:42 am
@tintin,
First... this sentence is horribly written (which might be why you are having trouble parsing it).

Argue in this case is the normal sense of the verb. The "author" is making an argument.

Let's break the sentence down...

The author is arguing in support of a "primary suggestion".

The "primary suggestion" is- "fining those who do not recycle in order to pay recycling collectors more for their work."

(I am pretty sure that the use of the gerund form "fining" is grammatically incorrect.)
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 01:38 pm
@tintin,
tintin wrote:



. . . the author of this article argues in support of is fining those who do not recycle in order to pay recycling collectors more for their work


. . . the author is advocating for. . .

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JTT
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 May, 2010 03:25 pm
@tintin,
arguing in support of sth = [strongly] making the case for a certain policy to be followed.

'fining', in this situation, is not what is traditionally known as a gerund. [CGEL makes a strong case that there is no specific and separate form gerund in English]

The primary suggestion [that the author of this article argues in support of] is fining those who do not recycle in order to pay recycling collectors more for their work.

Take out the relative clause portion that I've put in brackets and we can see that 'is fining' is the verb phrase for the subject "primary suggestion".
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