aidan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 07:14 am
@plainoldme,
Quote:
Exactly! They refuse to wear their glasses when they shop. Come on, lady, you are not now, and never were, Wonder Woman! Going without your glasses does not allow your imagined beauty to shine. One such woman asked for a wine called "Charly Head." I told her it was "Gnarly Head," but refrained from saying Charly Head makes no sense.

When I showed her the bottle, she had to admit that I was right. I never saw her again.

Laughing Laughing Laughing That's funny! I hate wearing my glasses when it rains so last night I went to the quiz with my contacts in which are fine for distance, but not for reading. I'm the scribe for our team since my handwriting is most legible and I had not heard a specific question because I'd knocked over someone's glass of cider and I went to get him another one and they'd written the answers on a different piece of paper for me to copy. Well, one looked to me like it said, 'On the noon' so I figured it must be some obscure line of poetry or something. Well, turns out the question was, 'Where is the Sea of Storms' and the answer was supposed to be 'on the moon.' We lost those two points and they were like, 'Jesus - next time wear your glasses, will ya?'

This little girl in my shop got the better of a rude customer once. This lady very rudely walked out and slammed the door and the little girl said, loudly enough for everyone else in the shop to hear, 'Mum - why did that lady slam the door?' Her mother tried to quiet her and said, 'She's probably in a hurry to go somewhere.' The little girl said in this loud carrying voice, 'No, I think she probably has to wee.' Laughing Laughing

None of us would have said anything, but we were glad she did.
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 04:31 pm
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

Exactly! They refuse to wear their glasses when they shop. Come on, lady, you are not now, and never were, Wonder Woman! Going without your glasses does not allow your imagined beauty to shine. One such woman asked for a wine called "Charly Head." I told her it was "Gnarly Head," but refrained from saying Charly Head makes no sense.

When I showed her the bottle, she had to admit that I was right. I never saw her again.


ok, in all seriousness here...

I have no problems with venting, lord knows I do it enough myself.

But looking back over some of the complaints (like the one above), about the customers that have been written here, I feel very uneasy.

I agree that some customers can be rude. We have ALL been rude customers at some time or another. Whether it was because we were stressed out, had big problems going on in our lives, were frustrated, or if it is just our nature, makes no difference. No one is pleasant all the time. No one is reasonable all the time.
Sometimes I can even understand the sales person having a bad day. I know almost all the people who work at the Walgreens down the street from my house. There have been times when I've seen a normally happy, helpful employee be a bit, well, less than optimum. Since I've had dealing with such person in the past, I know they must be sick, or in pain, somethings bothering them, or, they just aren't in a really good mood. I can't begrudge them that.

Sometimes, I've seen sales clerks who are having a grumpy day, and even though I don't know them, I get a sense they aren't normally like that.

Then, there's others that are just not happy, and particularly not happy that they have to deal with ordinary people like you and me.

These are the ones I steer clear of.

OK, and I am honestly and swear to God not picking on POM, but the post above illustrates what I'm about to say.

As a consumer, I go into a store for one main reason. To purchase something. I may not know exactly what I need, or I may know precisely what the item is. I might be getting something that I need, or something not necessary but helpful, or just want to buy something for someone else or myself for no particular reason.
The one thing I don't go into a store for is to have a debate with someone who works there, or to be made to admit they are right about something, and I am wrong.
I'm not surprised that particular woman was never seen again in that store. I mean, if I can go someplace else to get the exact same item, and don't have to listen to someone correct me, and make me admit I mispronounced the name of something, and most likely through body language and demeanor got the message the person working there thought I was dumb, or too vain to wear my reading glasses, or didn't have enough class to buy a certain product...well, I wouldn't go back there either. I think that would be a fairly obvious response.

A store, in this case a liquor store, is not some type of exclusive club where customers have to show their credentials to buy a bottle of wine, or some booze. If I'm not being rude, it certainly shouldn't matter to the people there what I know about wine. Oh sure, it would be nice if the clerk offered some education, if it seemed like the customer was interested. But they shouldn't make the customer feel they are unworthy to give you their money because they don't know, and maybe don't even care.

I do not know the first thing about wine. I don't drink it, I don't have any reason to pay attention to what others drink. When I bought that bottle of Woop Woop the other day, I did so assuming Whole Foods doesn't sell any crappy wine, and the clerk would not have pointed it out to me if it wasn't ok. It may not have been the best Austrailian wine there, but it was good enough to give to my neighbors to eat with our hamburgers. I bought it because it had a cute name, knowing it must be a nice wine, and that we'd all have a chuckle over it when I gave it to someone.
What would the clerk have gained if he looked down his nose at me? I still would have bought the wine, but I'm sure I would have felt some small degree of discomfort. Some people undoubtably would have felt a lot of discomfort. Some would have felt angry. What would he have gained? That he validated he's better than me? That he could show me he thought I wasn't up to his standards?
That doesn't sound like a very pleasant exchange.

I've had people walk up to me in a store, and ask me to read some small print for them. I don't admonish them, even mentally, for not having their reading glasses. I don't think that they are trying to appear more attractive. I just take it at face value that they couldn't see the print. Maybe they don't even know how to read, and are just faking an excuse of not having their glasses. Bottom line is, it's my pleasure to help them out, and I'm not even getting paid to do it.

When I sit down to read a book, I have a pair of one of those drug store glasses, with the lowest power of one. I just need a tiny bit of help. I don't even technically need it, it just makes reading for a period of time more comfortable.
I don't carry them around with me, because I can read most stuff when out in public. Oh, sometimes I have to read it from arms length, but that's ok. Once in a while the writing on a bottle is sooooooo small, I can't read it. If I asked someone to read it for me, I hope they aren't thinking anything negative.

In other words, I think people should try to keep the big picture in mind. We're not going into stores to annoy the people who work there. We just want to buy something. We may have quirky personalities, and mispronounce some things, and have eccentric opinions on the qualities of an item, but what does that matter?
We're all quirky, we're all weird.

And I say thank God for that.


Mame
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 04:46 pm
@chai2,
Amen, sista!
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 07:31 pm
@chai2,
Or, the old stand by from surfer dude lingo
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 07:33 pm
@aidan,
That really is funny. Kids are great at coming up with explanations!
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 07:49 pm
@chai2,
Hey, chai, perhaps I didn't give enough detail. I was behind the counter and she asked for Charly Head. I said that there is no wine by that name but did she want Gnarly Head. She answered, I just had it last night. I know it was Charlie Head. I then offered to take her to the wine. When I showed her the label, she said that it was the right wine then asked me whether I could read. To her it clearly said Charly Head. Then she looked at the label again . . . the type face is an old-fashioned, Western-style print. Oh, she said, this is not a C. What is this? I told it was gnarly. She seemed embarrassed for having sniped at me. She refused to make eye contact.

You would be surprised just how many customers have no idea what they want. There is a woman who comes in several mornings each week and asks What is that wine I always buy. Never buys anything else but can not remember it.

Once, a man came in and told me that I had recommended a Spanish red about 6 weeks before. Did I remember which one it was? Frankly, I did not remember him. I said that I probably deal with 60 customers a night and each recommendation is different, so I can't remember which wine I sold to him more than a month ago.

There are people who insist the wine was from France and when they finally locate it, it turns out to have come from Oregon. Or they ask for the wine of the month but become angry when I lead them to it. Generally, it was a wine from the previous month or another sale wine.

I generally suggest to people that they keep a wine diary . . . that they buy a small notebook, generally a 4 x 6, and record the date, the grape, the name of the vintner, the name of the wine and the price, with comments following.

Our wines are presented by varietal and some people become upset with that and prefer wine by classified by country of origin.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 07:55 pm
Actually, you all should hear my coworkers complain. With the exception of another woman my age, most have little patience with several customers.

OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 08:16 pm
@chai2,
A good and thoughtful post (no offense to Plain).
I agree with your sentiments in the matter.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Mar, 2010 08:30 pm

I 'm acquainted with a fellow who is quite ashamed
that he works in a camera store. He has worked there
for 25 years or so, that I 'm aware of. I 've said that
it is perfectly honorable to work in a camera store.
My opinion has had no effect on him.

He routinely requests friends n acquaintances, upon
the occasion of meeting them, not ever to visit his
place of work, in that he cannot be pleasant to them there
because of hassling customers. He is militant on that point.
He strongly dislikes his customers.
I have already pointed out the economic dynamics of that, to no effect.

I assured him that I 'd not go there.
He denied that, asserting that I WOUD go there
if I knew where it was and if I needed photographic materials.

O, well.





David
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 05:55 am
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

To her it clearly said Charly Head.

Well, there you go, she really did think it said Charly

Then she looked at the label again . . . the type face is an old-fashioned, Western-style print. Oh, she said, this is not a C. What is this? I told it was gnarly. She seemed embarrassed for having sniped at me. She refused to make eye contact.

I don't think it's good practice to let a customer remain embarrassed. I hate it when a person gets embarrassed in front of (or because of) me, and I try to do something to eliminate their shame. Personally, I would have said to her "Oh, don't worry about it, that happens all the time. The script is really ornate, and it's easy to take it for a C. In fact, see this wine here call Farging Icehole? You wouldn't believe what I thought it said"
Didn't it make you feel bad that you embarrassed her, and she couldn't look at you?


You would be surprised just how many customers have no idea what they want. There is a woman who comes in several mornings each week and asks What is that wine I always buy. Never buys anything else but can not remember it.

So, when you see this woman come in, how about saying "Good morning Ms. Regular and Valued Customer. Let me get you a bottle of your favorite wine, Woop Woop. You know, I've discovered another wine you may like also, would you like to try that also?"

Once, a man came in and told me that I had recommended a Spanish red about 6 weeks before. Did I remember which one it was? Frankly, I did not remember him. I said that I probably deal with 60 customers a night and each recommendation is different, so I can't remember which wine I sold to him more than a month ago.

There are people who insist the wine was from France and when they finally locate it, it turns out to have come from Oregon. Or they ask for the wine of the month but become angry when I lead them to it. Generally, it was a wine from the previous month or another sale wine.

"I'm sorry, would you like to get on our email or mailing list so you'll get notification of when your preferred wines go on sale?" or maybe (if you have this ability) "You're one of our regular customers. Let me ring this wine up for you at the sales price this time. You know, the best way to know when this wine is on special is to get on our email or mailing list so you'll receive notification"

I generally suggest to people that they keep a wine diary . . . that they buy a small notebook, generally a 4 x 6, and record the date, the grape, the name of the vintner, the name of the wine and the price, with comments following.

How about if YOU buy a small binder, with alphabetic tabs, and set up your own customer diary? When you take care of a regular customer, you can quickly flip to their page, note the date, and what they bought. You could encourage them to tell you their experience with the wine, and you could set up at the top of their main page a little area of a few lines to list their favorites.

Something like this....

Johnson, Carol
Favorites:
a. b.
c. d.
e. f.
g. h.

Date: Wine Purchased:
3/28/10 Woop Woop
4/3/10 Big Woop
4/6/ 10 Old Falstaff

You don't always take care of them you say? Well, you'd have a pretty good idea of their likes from you own book, or, you could present your idea to a manager and tell him you'd like to own the responsibility of devising a quick, easy tracking system for everyone to use. Then, you could place a larger binder at the register, and as regular customers come in, all employees can record their purchases.
You and your co-workers end up spending less time trying to figure out what wine the customer likes, and manager now knows you come up with solutions, and not just complain about problems.


Our wines are presented by varietal and some people become upset with that and prefer wine by classified by country of origin.

I personally like that classified by country thing too.
How about doing a poll of your customers, asking their opinion how how they like the wines classified, and take those results to the boss. Of course, everyone won't be completely happy with what is decided, that's just how it is. But what if it turns out most of the customers like that idea, and just never bothered to say anything? You have to stay on top of your customers likes, and stay on top of them if possible.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 06:13 am
@chai2,
U 'd be good at it, Chai; very, very good.





David
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 07:08 am
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

Actually, you all should hear my coworkers complain. With the exception of another woman my age, most have little patience with several customers.




I wish I were the manager/owner there. You know what I would do?

I'd start spending more time in my store, observing, observing, observing.
I would observe from a distance the body language going on between the employees and the customers while they were interacting.

I'd observe if a customer seemed embarrassed and couldn't make eye contact with an employee.
I'd observe any signs that an employee was showing frustration at being asked the same question whenever the same customer came in.
I'd observe the interactions between employees.

I would become invisible, and observe what was going on when everyone had their guard down.

I would ask friends and family members to come in the store and interact on all different levels and styles with the clerks, and have them clue me in as to what was going on.

I'd talk to customers in the store, asking them of their experience in the store. I'd ask them if there were one thing that would improve the service for them, what would it be. Then, I would listen, listen, listen. I'd jot all the ideas down, and observe any emerging patterns.
After talking to the customer once or twice, when I'd felt I'd gained their confidence, I'd ask them what was wrong with the place. Again, I would listen, and make notes, and find patterns.

At the same time...


I'd catch employees doing something really cool for a customer, or for a fellow employee. Preferably when they didn't know I was catching them.

I'd keep a supply of $20 gift cards close by, or on me. Gift cards are taxable to someone's income, so I'd figure a way that the income tax would fall on me.

I'd call it the "You're Pretty Cool" award, and I wouldn't make a big deal over it when handing it to someone. I'd make sure I did it when me and the cool employee were alone. People are smart, and I don't want them thinking I'm just making them part of a dog and pony show.
I'd just say, "You really helped that customer/employee, don't think you're not appreciated." and give them the card. This would just be an occassional random thing, no pattern to it.

Don't worry. The others will find out they got it. If there are complaints of "why didn't I get one?" The answer would be "You do something really cool, and you will" If they remain resentful, well, maybe they should be working there.

That brings me to the most lasting impact I would cause to happen. Culling the flock. Well, maybe that's the wrong word. The idea is I'm tasked with managing a herd of goats and sheep that are mixed together. Over time, the sheep have to go. As 1 or 2 sheep disappear, the other sheep will become more resentful, blaming me for being any number of negative things. The goats will know what is happening, as they realize that these sheep are being replaced with more goats, like them.

I want the sheep to be resentful, I want them to be on alert, I want them to become so unhappy they leave of their own accord.

I don't mind them being resentful for a while, while they are still there. The goats will realize what whiners they are, the customers will see how nice it is not dealing with people who are taking their interactions personally.

Sheep get a verbal warning, a written warning, a final warning....then they are out.
Honestly, I would be so happy as the sheep left, the more they bitch, the more I would know I made the right decision.

When hiring replacements, I would be very particular, and very focused on what I want. It's easy to feel sorry for someone, I've heard it all. I would remind myself "These people will get a job, it just won't be here"

If this was a private business, I'd devise a system where the employees would share in the profits of their hard work. I wouldn't worry about my income, it would naturally grow as my stores reputation grew.
My team of goats would become self governing to an extent. Knowing it will hurt their income AND reputation by allowing someone to become a sheep, they wouldn't put up with inferior co-workers. I'd listen to the goats. I'd be a goat myself.

Seems like a win-win-win. Happy employees, happy customers, happy me.



0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 07:14 am
Thank you David
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 08:05 am
Chai, truer words were never spoken.

I am in awe of your ability.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 09:02 am
Chai, It sounds like you woke up on the wrong side of the bed.

It's fine to make suggestions but you know nothing of the real situation. None of your suggestions would work there and no one would want to implement them. Seriously.

The person who might be called the manager is the wine buyer. She is grumpy woman given to childish fits who spies on the workers via a system of cameras which broadcast to screens in the office. I have suggested to other employees . . . who have quit rather than deal with her . . . that 20 years of working in a basement office have had a negative effect upon her. That is taken by them as the joke it is.

If a wine is popular with the customers, as for example a Chilean cabernet sauvignon called Root One is, she removes it from the inventory. I would call that shooting one's self in the foot. The irony is that the other branch of the store, which actually does have a manager, carries Root One over the objections of the wine buyer and they sell a case a week. This store is in a blue collar neighborhood and sells more beer than wine as opposed to the main store, located across the street from Smith College.

If an employee discovers a wine and asks her to carry it, she never will.

She is not a good addition to the sales floor (this is a small operation that is generally overstaffed with two employees working at once) as she lacks graciousness. She is abrupt and impatient with customers. Her presence there is limited to about four events a year and that is far and away enough.

Now, Winchester Wine and Spirits has a computer on a desk that customers can use to keep a running account. Purchases are, I believe, automatically recorded for standing customers, who can then add their remarks and research their own buying patterns. I suggested that to her because she brought in an industry based computer that constantly broadcasts announcements and allows people to obtain drink recipes. Customers hate it. They complain about the noise. The very few (in the year and half it is has been there, I have seen fewer than five use it) that ever consult think the machine is too slow.

Frankly, there is no place to put a notebook. The wine buyer would throw it out if anyone brought in such an item.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 09:46 am
Well, this thread was a hijacked.

Look, I was hired because I know how to pair foods with wine. I owe a debt to a wonderful man who ran a wine store in Concord. It was his second career after having taught high school French for many years. I wish I had his expertise! I would go into his store and tell him what I wanted to serve and he would select the perfect wine.

And, I am considered among the most gracious and knowledgeable of the eleven part-time employees that principally man the two stores. Some of the younger employees ask how I can be patient with their least favs and how I can find the jokes of the guys who come in to have an audience funny.

I am trying to get out of the situation. My coworker, the one who passed off the procrastinator to me, is also trying to get out of the situation. It is a combination of the bad customers and the wine buyer who are making us look for another part-time job.

Chai suggested that were she the manager, she would spend more time on the floor, and would reward workers.

I have worked retail for many years while applying for what I call real jobs (that allow you to earn a living rather than $10,000/annum). I have never seen a manager reward a sales associate. When I worked at Williams-Sonoma, one manager would talk up my wit to other employees but refused to give me an annual raise simply because I once wore leggings to work! Because I was generally the lead sales on any shift I worked, one once told everyone to imitate me but that is as close to affirmation as one can hope to get in retail.

BTW, managers generally last between 5 and 18 months in a chain store.

As for Chai's statement about leaving a person embarrassed. Reread what I wrote. She was embarrassed because she had insulted me. She asked me whether I could read.

Most customers do want to be reminded which wine they like. They want to be corrected on to pronounce a French wine or what the German terms on a label mean. Of course, there are some with an impressive level of knowledge, like the young man from the Dominican Republic who gave me a quick course on rum.

As for the matter of not wearing glasses . . . you have no idea how much time is wasted by customers who refuse to wear their glasses . . . and how much grousing was done in the stock room at stores like Williams-Sonoma by employees over customers who leave them home. So, Chai, if someone asks you as a fellow customer what a label or a price tag says, you might find that amusing but, if over the course of a shift, you have had to deal with customer after customer who can not read what is there for them to read, you would be frustrated.

When the customer is obviously hanging on to the hair color she had 40 years ago and specifically came to shop but is without her glasses, she exudes an air of I-purposefully-left-my-glasses-home-because-I-cannot-accept-my-age. She seems to be asking for something akin to affirmation, exaggerated service, perhaps, dare I say it, worship. The Charly Head woman was brusque with a commanding tone.

Supposedly, a greeting by an employee keeps theft at a minimum. I personally hate to be greeted. If I have to go to a store where customers are greeted, I walk around the back of the greeter. When I worked at Williams-Sonoma, not one coworker ever said she liked being greeted. The same manager who wouldn't give me a raise because I once wore leggings asked me how I would feel if I weren't greeted and I said wonderful, which is the truth.

When I worked at the ceramics gallery, I did greet people. It was a sole proprietorship, located on a shopping street. Access to the street, to a move theatre and restaurants colored the business in a positive way. The fact that is was a gift shop/gallery did as well. Many of the customers became friends of the owner.

While I have made friends with several of the customers . . . one keeps me abreast of music events, another recommended an evening event that I went to, another actually gave me a present . . . there are reasons why this store can not and will never have the same atmosphere the ceramics shop did.

I should add that I have been weighing writing a letter to the owner for about two months. A year ago, he discovered he had lost $11,000.

He blamed the employees. While coffee, tea and instant hot chocolate are available to employees, he blames us for taking and not paying for sandwiches and snacks (both liquor stores exist alongside a small market and deli).

I mentioned to my age peer that the short fall can not be the employees. I asked whether she could imagine ML or JC ever taking anything and the proposition was so ridiculous she laughed out loud. The owner has made us sign our sales receipt each time we purchase something.

I think his loss is due to a large stack of five milk crates containing beer singles that have been in the cooler since I started working there in Oct 2007. I pointed them out to the wine buyer almost a year ago. Nothing was done.
Why do I hesitate to tell the owner? Because of the employee whose bailiwick the cooler is. He's a brilliant man who is wonderful in many ways but who has no business sense. A misplaced academic, he has worked there for 20 years. Hurting him is the last thing I would do.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 10:02 am
@plainoldme,
plainoldme wrote:

Chai, It sounds like you woke up on the wrong side of the bed.

No, I'm quite happy today, as I am most days. My posts above were quite positive, concentrating on the improvements that could be made, including of course, some of the unfortunate for some, plan of action.

It's fine to make suggestions but you know nothing of the real situation. None of your suggestions would work there and no one would want to implement them. Seriously.

That is a typical response. The old "it won't work here" response. What I've found, is that these techniques really do work, they just don't work for the people who are determined to remain unhappy in their job. Well, they are welcome to remain unhappy. They'll just have to end up being that way working somewhere else. Those who choose not to implement these changes would need to find someplace to work where they can remain stuck and complaining, and would be replaced with people who look for better ways of doing things, and would be allowed to try out their ideas. Seriously

The person who might be called the manager is the wine buyer. She is grumpy woman given to childish fits who spies on the workers via a system of cameras which broadcast to screens in the office. I have suggested to other employees . . . who have quit rather than deal with her . . . that 20 years of working in a basement office have had a negative effect upon her. That is taken by them as the joke it is.



If a wine is popular with the customers, as for example a Chilean cabernet sauvignon called Root One is, she removes it from the inventory. I would call that shooting one's self in the foot. The irony is that the other branch of the store, which actually does have a manager, carries Root One over the objections of the wine buyer and they sell a case a week. This store is in a blue collar neighborhood and sells more beer than wine as opposed to the main store, located across the street from Smith College.

If an employee discovers a wine and asks her to carry it, she never will.

She is not a good addition to the sales floor (this is a small operation that is generally overstaffed with two employees working at once) as she lacks graciousness. She is abrupt and impatient with customers. Her presence there is limited to about four events a year and that is far and away enough.

Sounds like this wine buyer should be the first person to find more suitable employment for herself.

I was saying what I would do if I were the manager/owner.


Now, Winchester Wine and Spirits has a computer on a desk that customers can use to keep a running account. Purchases are, I believe, automatically recorded for standing customers, who can then add their remarks and research their own buying patterns. I suggested that to her because she brought in an industry based computer that constantly broadcasts announcements and allows people to obtain drink recipes. Customers hate it. They complain about the noise. The very few (in the year and half it is has been there, I have seen fewer than five use it) that ever consult think the machine is too slow.

Frankly, there is no place to put a notebook. The wine buyer would throw it out if anyone brought in such an item.

Then carry you own notebook around and keep it on your person. Wear a belt or pouch you can tuck it into, or connect to a lanyard around your neck.

Sometimes POM, a person has to rise above the situation, and just do the right thing on your own. You may be ridiculed, told it's no use, blah blah blah. But if you know it's the right thing, don't worry about what the sheep that keep trying to pull you down. Be a goat, even if you're the only one.

I hope you don't think I just pulled these ideas out of my ass. What I have said is a large part of my job. One of my favorite parts.

2 years ago, the region I work in was loosing 40% of new hires within the year.
At that time, I was put in charge of the inital screening of ALL applicants. Instead of managers making their own immediate hiring decesions, I got all the candidates emailed to me from our recruiting department.

Right now, I am directly looking at a spreadsheet I keep of all the people who have applied her over the last 2 years...

Of the 600 applicant profiles I have received from recruiting, I only called 50% of them.
Then, after talking to them, I only set up a group interview with 25% of that 600 total. The group interview knocked out a few more, bringing it to 22% of the total. It isn't until then that the manager sees them, and they end up hiring 20% of the of that original number of 600. In other words, of 600 people sent to me, only 120 got hired.

As of today, instead of loosing 40% of them in a year, close to 50 people, the retention rate is now 92%, meaning we are only losing 10 people within a year. I know from personal knowledge that 1 person left because of an unforeseeable illness, another was called into military service, and a third was found to be breaking policy.

So, yeah, I'd say I know a little something about hiring and keeping good people.

So, go ahead and tell me how wrong I am, and how nothing will work to help the situation.

What I'm going to do is enjoy myself at a dinner I planned for tomorrow night, at a really classy restaurant. There's going to be 170 people there. The tab's going to be about 9 grand.

I've arranged for groovy cocktail and dinner music a la Frank Sinatra, Bobby Darrin and the like, then later on we'll all rock out to dance music.

You know how we can afford to do this?
Because without getting rid of 40% of the employees in a year, we save a couple of hundred thousand in training costs.
I'd say that's a pretty good return.

Woop Woop!!

Hey, I gotta get back to work.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 10:06 am
oh, and I didn't hijack the thread, if this is a vent thread, that was my vent.

hey, I can't help it if you can't find a job for more than 10,000 a year.
maybe if you weren't such a pickle, your karma would change.

now I Really have to go to work!
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Mar, 2010 10:50 pm

Chai, u r an articulate girl.





David
0 Replies
 
 

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