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Three Pebbles in English Language Beach

 
 
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 10:29 pm
Got three pebbles, and being confused by them.

(1) awwww c'mon dsn i doubt he was trying to be a cock. A little lighthearted fun.

What is "c'mon"? I guess it is "Simple Simon" -- idiot.

(And "dsn" is actually "doesn't"?)

(2) Both in car accidents. I have been there and know it is a tough situation but remember the good tims you had with the people and keep you head high. May everyone drive a little safer and with caution from here-on-in.

What does "here-on-in" mean?

(3) The declared goal was a "festival of the festivals" for the Munich audience.

What does "festival" mean?
TIA
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 11:05 pm
"c'mon" = come on = used to try to suggest that someone change an opinion that is unreasonable or that the person joins you

"You like eating raw meat? Come on! That's nasty! "

"Come on, let's go to the bar"

I have no idea about "dsn".

"here-on-in" looks like a mistake to me, but the meaning is clear. It's "from now on".

Festival is based on the same root as "party" in many languages. It can be described as a large culture-wide party ot simply a public party.
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oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 11:18 pm
I've guessed "here-in-on" as what you indicated, but it seems not a mispelling. The poster of "here-in-on" is from Ontario, Canada.
I've gotten inspired by your explanation upon "festival".
Thank you Craven de Kere.
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Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 11:26 pm
Here-on-in is very much a canadian saying. Craven is right, it does mean from now on.
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oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 11:59 pm
Ceili wrote:
Here-on-in is very much a canadian saying. Craven is right, it does mean from now on.


Wow, now we found Canadian English is different to American/British English. Smile Rolling Eyes
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Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Oct, 2003 12:14 am
In this case it's actually the opposite, Americans are more likely to use the expression "from here on out". out vs in
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McTag
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Oct, 2003 12:48 am
I think dsn will be an abbreviation of somebody's name.

It's difficult to try to learn idiomatic speech by writing about it....and it constantly changes....but "aw, c'mon" could be said to be the same as "get real" or even "hello?" Smile

See what I mean? Watch more television!
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Wy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Oct, 2003 01:26 am
oristarA, your description of "three pebbles..." really made me smile! That's an example of excellent use of the English language! Smile
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oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Oct, 2003 07:50 am
Smile
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Oct, 2003 07:58 am
I'd guess "dsn" is just a typographical error. The letter "s" is right next to the letter "a" on the keyboard. Maybe it was supposed to have been "dan" - a common male given name.
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