5
   

beg the question = dodge the question?

 
 
Reply Wed 3 Mar, 2010 10:43 pm


Reconsolidation has been observed for several types of memory across different species, but these studies beg the question "what is the advantage of remaking a memory multiple times?"

More context, click:

http://www.dxy.cn/bbs/user/download/16399626/CFS.pdf
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 1,461 • Replies: 9
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fresco
 
  0  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 01:14 am
@oristarA,
Not "dodge the question"...."fail to notice a questionable assumption". In this case, "evolutionary theory" would suggest that "an advantage" would need to be demonstrated and cannot be assumed for "reconsolidation"
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 01:16 am
@oristarA,
This is the colloquial use of "begging the question" (which does not mean the logical fallacy by this name) and it means "to raise the question" or, in other words, to suggest that we ask this question.
fresco
 
  0  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 01:28 am
@Robert Gentel,
"Colloquial use" raising the issue of "description" as opposed to "prescription" from a linguistic point of view. (Compare also "Ain't not got one" as being "descriptively grammatical" in the Chomskyian sense of a rule governed idiolect)
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 01:42 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:



Reconsolidation has been observed for several types of memory across different species, but these studies beg the question

More context, click:

http://www.dxy.cn/bbs/user/download/16399626/CFS.pdf


The studies lead us to believe that this question ( "what is the advantage of remaking a memory multiple times?") needs to be asked explored and answered.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 02:29 am
@fresco,
fresco this is an ESL question, your linguistic gymnastics isn't going to impress, only confuse.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 02:34 am
@fresco,
fresco wrote:

"Colloquial use" raising the issue of "description" as opposed to "prescription" from a linguistic point of view. (Compare also "Ain't not got one" as being "descriptively grammatical" in the Chomskyian sense of a rule governed idiolect)


even I have no idea what this means.
0 Replies
 
oolongteasup
 
  0  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 03:34 am
@fresco,
pay no tension frescoky i luv yer stuff

whenever you type chomsky, idiolect is never far behind

self- fulfilling, didactic or kismet?
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 09:40 am
@Robert Gentel,
Agreed this is ESL hence my original non-technical answer.Note that my secondary point was addressed to your use of the word "colloquial" and not to the OP. The issue of "description versus prescription" can be found in the wiki article on "begging the question". My Chomskyian embellishment of this involves the confusion of "logicality" with "grammaticality" by prescriptivists.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Thu 4 Mar, 2010 03:33 pm
@Robert Gentel,
I wouldn't say it's colloquial, Robert. I'd say that this meaning is pretty much standard through all of language.

It matters not where it came from or what arguments there are over its "correct" translation.. The only thing that matters is how native English speakers now use it.
0 Replies
 
 

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