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how to understand what is the simple tale, give me an example

 
 
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 08:25 am
how to understand what is the simple tale in the West, give me an example
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 1,448 • Replies: 17
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 08:32 am
@xiaowangshu,
Explain what you mean buy "the simple tale," and someone might be able to give you the examples you seek. There is an expression in English which is "a fairy tale," meaning a story which is patently and obviously not true, but which is provided for illustrative purposes or simply for entertainment. If you can give us a better idea of what you mean by "the simple tale," then someone here can probably help you.
xiaowangshu
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 09:55 am
@Setanta,
I see, I want to know whether the simple tale for children in the westmeans the fairy tale .
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 10:02 am
@xiaowangshu,
Yes, people often use the term "fairy tale" in English to describe stories told to children, although i would take the opportunity to note that fairy tale is applied usually to traditional stories told to children, and not necessarily to all stories told to children. It is also noteworthy that when used between adults, the term fairly tale is used to suggest that someone is lying.

There is no locution in English which is "the simple tale." There is no way for a native speaker of English to know what you mean by that term.
xiaowangshu
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 10:49 am
@Setanta,
Ok, like The Complete Grimm’s Fairy Tales, the stories in it are simple tales, and they are told to children and adults. The right expression should be fairy tales which people can understand what I mean. is it right?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 10:54 am
Generally, yes. The tales of the Brothers Grimm are usually referred to as fairy tales. It would be inaccurate, though, to refer to them as simple. They deal with horror and death, things which exercise the minds of children as they don't exercise the minds of adult. They are anything but simple.

A common expression used in the American language is "bedtime stories."
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 11:03 am
@Setanta,
oooo.....Grimms Fairy Tales.

What about Hans Christian Anderson?

Ever read "The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf"?

went straight down to hades.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 12:04 pm
@chai2,
I've not read Anderson, but i'm sure that it was not more than the little chippy desrved. I never completed Grimm, it was too horrible and disgusting . . . only the Germans would have thought those kinds of stories appropriate to read to a child before you put out the light, and leave him or her wide-eyed and trembling in a cold, dark bedroom.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 12:13 pm
@Setanta,
oh yeah, what a bitch she was.

she was taking a loaf of bread to her poor granny, and had to pass over some muddy ground.

she didn't want to get her pretty new shoes dirty, so she was using the bread as a stepping stone.

she trod the loaf and the ground swallered her up.

there was something in there her getting toads in her mouth too.

nothing like getting a mouthful of toad, I always say.
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chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 12:16 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

only the Germans would have thought those kinds of stories appropriate to read to a child before you put out the light, and leave him or her wide-eyed and trembling in a cold, dark bedroom.


Laughing
That reminds me of an old Saturday Night Live skit.

Someone impersonating Stephen King walks into his kids bedroom, with a book under his arm.
The boy is already in bed, all snuggled in.

When he sees Steve, he starts screaming "NO DADDY NO!!! PLEASE DON'T READ ME A BEDTIME STORY!!!!"
Francis
 
  2  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 12:20 pm
Plain and simple..

Let's talk about Plain Tales of the Hills..
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 12:40 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
There is no locution in English which is "the simple tale."


Results 1 - 10 of about 237,000 English pages for "the simple tale".

Quote:
There is no way for a native speaker of English to know what you mean by that term.


There is a way actually, Setanta, where a native speaker of English might know and that is by thinking for a moment instead of leaping to knee jerk ignorance.

And in your first response you actually did just that.


0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 04:12 pm
@chai2,
I don't recall that one, but i can just see it in my head . . . you crack me up, Darlin' . . . hey, c'm'ere . . . oops, The Girl is watchin' . . . act casual . . .
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Feb, 2010 04:13 pm
@Francis,
You caught me Flat footed with that remark . . . are you tryin' to get a Rise out of us?
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2010 01:55 am
@Setanta,
No, no! It's just that it seemed to me a quite usual expression and a simple search on google confirmed that.

In addition, you know how multilingual minds work, I made the association with "Simples contes de collines" from Rudyard Kipling.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2010 02:19 am
@xiaowangshu,
xiaowangshu wrote:

Ok, like The Complete Grimm’s Fairy Tales, the stories in it are simple tales, and they are told to children and adults. The right expression should be fairy tales which people can understand what I mean. is it right?


Probably a MUCH better term is folk tales.

This gives the true sense of these as being stories passed from generation to generation because, as some theorize, they reflect basic themes and issues common to humanity, and that work on a deep and likely unconscious level.

They are NOT simple in any sense of the word...they are rich and complex and laden with meaning and have endured for millenia.


The study of folk tales is a fascinating and extremely lively discipline, with much lively debate and passionate disagreement.

oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Tue 23 Feb, 2010 04:54 am
@xiaowangshu,
here's a simple tale translated

http://www.chinapage.com/story/sun.html
0 Replies
 
xiaowangshu
 
  1  
Reply Sun 7 Mar, 2010 07:14 pm
@dlowan,
folk tales is better. The folk tale is told by human of ancientry, not wriiten by writers in recent years,
0 Replies
 
 

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