0
   

With relative idiom to replace what I said

 
 
Reply Mon 27 Oct, 2003 10:33 pm
(1) In like a lion,out like a lamb
(2) God grants hard-working people
(3) Do your best for yourself
(What I want to express is that one should take care of himself when things go badly)

If you could not find the proper idioms, please try to rewrite them with your better English writing skill.
TIA.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,294 • Replies: 15
No top replies

 
Craven de Kere
 
  2  
Reply Mon 27 Oct, 2003 11:02 pm
Re: With relative idiom to replace what I said
Making up idioms only works with certain constructs like metaphors, some are simply regional and most of the time people just use existing ones.

Here are a few:

"When the going gets tough, the tough get going."

"God helps those who help themselves."
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 12:14 am
Thanks CdK.

And where can find the existing idioms like which you have posted here?
I've tried the site go English idiom (link :
http://www.goenglish.com/Index.asp )
but could not find them out.
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 12:17 am
I'm sorry but I don;t know of any online resources for idioms. Try searching for "idiom list" or "phrasal verbs".
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 01:24 am
Oristar, These aren't really idioms. They're adages or sayings.

In like a lion, out like a lamb is an adage. It refers to the month of March, which starts blustery and ends mildly.

If you end up with lemons, make lemonade (make the best of a bad situation)
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 04:48 am
Hi Roberta,
The proverb:
March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb.

The meaning of the proverb is very clear, but it sounds too long. If using "March's manner" instead, can it be understood?

Also, regarding the adage "If you end up with lemons, make lemonade (make the best of a bad situation)" is somewhat long, can it be expressed as "Make things best for yourself"? If we cannot find out a terse adage/saying, just clearly express what we want to express... Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 08:29 am
Oristar, I'm surprised to hear you say that adages are too wordy. They're usually associated with pithiness. No, it would not be clear to say March's manner.

"Make things best for yourself" This is usually stated as "Make the best of a bad situation." If you don't like this one, how about saying, "Make things the best as you can for yourself." (Note that best takes a "the"--the best, the worst.)
0 Replies
 
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 04:21 pm
Nobody's mentioned the second one yet, "God grants hard-working people" ... so far, it's a sentence fragment; there's no object for the granting.

"God grants rest to hard-working people" would be a complete statement, but I'm not sure if that's what you mean to say.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 06:42 pm
Roberta, the sentence "Make things the best as you can for yourself" is very clear and is what I wanted. And then at this point, I've been helped understand the adage "If you end up with lemons, make lemonade" is better, cos it is an existing one with long history. Smile
Wy, in fact I used "grant" instead of "award" -- God award hard-working people -- is it acceptable?
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 06:46 pm
Oristar, Wy, in fact I used "grant" instead of "award" -- God award hard-working people -- is it acceptable?

I'll jump in for Wy. It should read, "God rewards hard-working people." An award is something you win. A reward is something you're given as a result of something you've done. You can be rewarded with an award.
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 06:48 pm
Link to American Idioms

oristarA- Does this help?
0 Replies
 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 06:57 pm
I use the expression, "When life gives you lemons, make lemonade".
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 08:49 pm
Roberta, please have a look at the examples below:

(1) God gives you your life. (Remark: it is with normal grammar)
(2) God bless! (Remark: we don't want to say "God blesses!", do we? It is different to normal grammar.)

So expressing "God award hard-working people" is the same of expressing "God awards hard-working people".
Because God is supernatural and above anything Very Happy .


Phoenix32890, your link helps me understand "lemon" better. Thanks! Smile
0 Replies
 
Wy
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 09:18 pm
"God bless" is a short form of "May God bless you." It's a request to Got to bless the person.

God is singular, so must take the singular verb "awards." And both award and grant must have an object in this case. You must be granted or awarded something. If you use reward, as in "God rewards hard-working people," then the reward can be unspecified...
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 09:21 pm
And with God Bless - think of it this way. The speaker is saying "I want God to Bless you".....? Does that work?
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2003 10:35 pm
Thanks for putting it right. Very Happy
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » With relative idiom to replace what I said
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.05 seconds on 11/15/2019 at 09:44:04