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experience of developing a new document

 
 
tintin
 
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 10:01 pm
please see this English text.

Each of us has had the experience of developing a new document by revising an older document or by using a template. When we finish our work, we hit the “save” button and immediately realize that we have just written over with new text an old document that we will need again in the future.


I don't understand the meaning at the last line....

"...immediately realize that we have just written over with new text an old document that we will need again in the future..."

what does this mean "written over with new text an old document" ??? .... exactly stuck here.
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 10:54 pm
Quote:
immediately realize that we have just written overan old document with new text and we will need the old document again in the future..."


Imagine having a document on a computer. It says some things you want to say but not all the things you want to say. You change some of the old document to reflect what you want to say. you click save. where is the original old document in its unchanged form?
The way around this of course is to save the modified (new) document with a different file name.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 12 Jan, 2010 11:02 pm
@dadpad,
Maybe we should add that the most common option for doing so is labeled Save As. . .
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 01:28 am
Possibly a little punctuation will help the ideas get separated properly.

When we finish our work, we hit the “save” button and immediately realize that we have just written over, with new text, an old document that we will need again in the future.
tintin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 12:08 pm
@contrex,
@contrex
>>we have just written over

is it different than 'we have just written' ?.... I have hesitation in using word 'over' . Does it change the meaning ?

>>>that we have just written over, with new text, an old document that we will need again in the future.

it is not saying clearly that old document will be lost....this is my concern......it says "old document that we will need again in the future"
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 12:26 pm
When you are using a computer, if you load a document into a word processing program, make some changes. and then save it, if you do not choose "Save as..." and give it a new name, you will "write over" (or "overwrite") the previous version. The previous version will be obliterated by the new one. This is what overwriting means.

Thus you would (in the hypothetical future) no longer be able to get access to a document which you will (in the real future) need (but not be able to use) in the future
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 12:32 pm
@contrex,
When you are using a computer, if you load a document into a word processing program, make some changes. and then save it, if you do not choose "Save as..." and give it a new name, you will "write over" (or "overwrite") the previous version. The previous version will be obliterated by the new one. This is what overwriting means.

Thus you would (in the hypothetical future) no longer be able to get access to a document which you will (in the real future) need (but not be able to use).
tintin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 01:29 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
you will "write over" (or "overwrite")


feeling comfortable now.

Quote:
we have just written over with new text an old document that we will need again in the future.


is not that an should be "on" ?

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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 01:53 pm
tintin wrote:
Quote:
we have just written over with new text an old document that we will need again in the future.

is not that an should be "on" ?


Should not that "an" be "on"?

No. As I explained before, the words "with new text" should be separated with commas. Thus they form a clause which can be removed without creating an ungrammatical sentence. Consider:

we have just written over, with new text, an old document that we will need again in the future.

we have just written over an old document that we will need again in the future.



tintin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jan, 2010 10:06 pm
@contrex,
ahhh.... worked like a charm.

that red middleman almost killed me Smile

but now its ok .... its pretty clear now . excellent work.

thank you very much.

it was very much helpful
tintin
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 11:39 am
@tintin,
Can you look at the text below which is just a continuation of the above .

The same is true when we reorganize our files to reduce the clutter we
made in the last month and unintentionally


which files ? computer files or physical hard files ? How do I assume that now ?

clutter ?

why "and unintentionally" ? ....we could just skip "and" ...i.e in the last month unintentionally .....anything wrong with this ?
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jan, 2010 02:04 pm
Sounds like you have missed out some text after the word "unintentionally". I am sure the writer meant "computer files", because of the context.
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