0
   

By Definition and Other Questions

 
 
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2003 11:14 am
(1) I didn't get what does "by definition" mean:

"I'm not necessarily claiming it should be of worse quality, but why should code submitted randomly by some hacker in Russia and distributed by some open source project, why is that, by definition, better?"

In addition, in the first "why" clause, there is no a verb as predicate. That is actually like this:

but why should code, why is that, by definition, better?

I don't understand why the speaker used two whys, cos it in fact meant:
but why should code is that better...

(2) What is ITxpo?

Ballmer made his comments during an executive interview before about 3,000 IT managers at the Gartner Symposium ITxpo.

I know the IT means Information Technology, but why does xpo mean?

(3) Granted, I think a problem arises when they don't understand what to do when someone says "No thanks, I'm not interested", that implicates eroding your freedom of choice.
The usage "granted" is most commonly used, and its accurate meaning is "agreed"?

TIA.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 0 • Views: 1,138 • Replies: 9
No top replies

 
fishin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2003 11:27 am
Re: By Definition and Other Questions
oristarA wrote:
(2) What is ITxpo?

Ballmer made his comments during an executive interview before about 3,000 IT managers at the Gartner Symposium ITxpo.

I know the IT means Information Technology, but why does xpo mean?



"ITxpo" is a IT industry Trade Show. The naming is a play on the "IT" moniker and the word "expo" which is a commonly used short name for "exposition".

http://www.gartner.com/2_events/symposium/2003/asset_51839.jsp
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2003 09:52 pm
Thanks fishin', xpo, xp, O! Smile
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2003 11:25 pm
"I'm not necessarily claiming it should be of worse quality, but why should code submitted randomly by some hacker in Russia and distributed by some open source project, why is that, by definition, better?"

"By definition" in this context suggests an assumption. It would be helpful if the preceding sentence were included here, but I think I can explain what is meant.

The assumption is that whatever the source of the code, the one from a Russian hacker would be better. For example, you've got a car made in the United States and a car made in Argentina. Since the US has a reputation for making fairly good cars, you could say that the car from the US is by definition better than the car made in Argentina. This is an assumption, and doesn't really take into account the quality of either car in question.

3) Granted, I think a problem arises when they don't understand what to do when someone says "No thanks, I'm not interested", that implicates eroding your freedom of choice.
The usage "granted" is most commonly used, and its accurate meaning is "agreed"?

"Granted" does mean agreed. Or given. Something that's assumed to be known or correct.

Both these sentences are awkwardly worded, btw.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Oct, 2003 01:16 am
I think I have gotten what "by definition" means. Thanks Roberta.

As for "granted", do you mean the defintion of the word can be described as "assumed (something to be known or correct)"?

You indicated "Both these sentences are awkwardly worded, btw." Is the both including the first sentence -- "I'm not necessarily claiming it should be of worse quality, but why should code submitted randomly by some hacker in Russia and distributed by some open source project, why is that, by definition, better?" ?
Ah! I have ever thought this sentence is well-worded. Drunk
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Oct, 2003 08:13 am
As for "granted", do you mean the defintion of the word can be described as "assumed (something to be known or correct)"?

Yes, Oristar, "granted" may be used to assume that something is correct. It's often used as a word of concession in an argument or disagreement. For example, I say that New York is the greatest city on the planet. My friend says that Paris is the greatest city. We're arguing the merits and faults of each city. Then my friend says, "Granted, New York is bigger and more diverse, but ...."

Something strange happens at the end of this sentence. It's as if someone is speaking, not writing:
"I'm not necessarily claiming it should be of worse quality, but why should code submitted randomly by some hacker in Russia and distributed by some open source project, by definition, better?"

I deleted the awkward section. Now it sounds like a written sentence and makes sense all the way through.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Oct, 2003 11:33 am
I totally got it now. Thanks Roberta!

http://skins.hotbar.com/skins/mailskins/img/050103/050103sports_mountainclimb_prv.gif
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Oct, 2003 04:53 pm
Oristar, I'm glad you got it. Now be careful and don't fall off the mountain! :-)
0 Replies
 
Craven de Kere
 
  1  
Reply Thu 23 Oct, 2003 05:04 pm
Boida, you forgot the 'to be' verb.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 24 Oct, 2003 12:18 am
You're right, Craven. I deleted one too many words. Mea culpa.


Oristar, Here's the corrected sentence:

"I'm not necessarily claiming it should be of worse quality, but why should code submitted randomly by some hacker in Russia and distributed by some open source project, by definition, be better?"
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » By Definition and Other Questions
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.06 seconds on 09/22/2019 at 05:52:37