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That time of year-bonus review aka treating an adult as a child

 
 
Linkat
 
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 02:51 pm
I am not happy (for a lot of reasons, but for now that dreaded bonus review). Although getting a bonus is nice, I feel the whole rating of adults in a professional job as childish and demeaning.

This year even more so. We now are expected to use a bell curve. In others words x% is outstanding; x% very good; x% good and x% not good. So we are forced even if no one is meeting the standard of outstanding to rate a certain amount of people as outstanding and even if everyone is doing a stellar job, we need to rate a small amount as not good.

I would think that managers are hired or promoted because they are responsible and capable of making judgements without such ludicrous and childish rules. Anyone else deal with this type of sh*t?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 5 • Views: 1,222 • Replies: 10
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George
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 02:59 pm
That is flat-out absurd. You're right to be angry!
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Dec, 2009 03:34 pm
@Linkat,
George is right. Anyway, using a bell curve, there is going to be someone perfectly competent and up to standard who receives a terrible rating. If they ever start reducing the staff, that terrible rating may come back to haunt someone.

I once got marked down for not getting along well with the rest of the crew. Now, 75% of the workforce was Navajo and there was no Anglo on site that got along better with the tribe. Let it slide, or get an additional comment like "Roger is argumentative."?
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Dec, 2009 12:40 pm
@roger,
I do let it slide, that is why I post it here so I can YELL some where.
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Dec, 2009 01:36 pm
I suggest you look up some of Dan Ariely's research http://www.ted.com/speakers/dan_ariely.html. He has some really fascinating insights.

One of which is this: monetary incentives are not as effective as people think. Monetary incentives will reduce the speed at which tasks are accomplished instead of speed them up.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Dec, 2009 01:38 pm
@Linkat,
Also, this goes back to what I was saying on your other thread about using incorrect measurements.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Dec, 2009 02:50 pm
@DrewDad,
Un huh. Money is a reason for leaving one job and accepting another. It inspires neither loyalty nor hard, effective work.
George
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Dec, 2009 02:53 pm
@roger,
I think that for some people money is a motivator, but only in the short term.
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Dec, 2009 03:13 pm
@DrewDad,
Kinda my point here in that in general the bonus ain't so bad even for those at the lower scale - not a 100% sure if the poor sap that ended up labeled as not doing good is getting anything though as he doesn't directly report to me so I don't know his numbers - I think it is up to the discretion of department head.

It is more the fact that these "ratings" at least in my opinion does not necessarily reflect an individual's true performance, but more if they are a bit more ahead of the pack.

It is really difficult now as well - since we haven't been able to promote anyone (even those that desire it - new policy in the past year - we used to promote when some one demonstrated that they earned it rather than an official position being opened.) - and we have quite a bit of people that are high performers as there hasn't been much movement lately and we got rid of some of the lower performers with the layoffs.
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plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Aug, 2010 09:29 am
This topic caught my eye when I finished posting elsewhere.

I once wore a tunic and leggings to work in the 1990s, not knowing such a costume violated company policy. It was a cute outfit and comfortable to wear for a long day of standing on one's feet. The job was in retail and women who worked as doctors' receptionists and as tellers in banks -- jobs carrying higher status -- dressed in tunics and leggings.

The manager chewed me out. At the end of the fiscal year, when employee reviews were made, this manager -- who realized I was often the sales leader and who spoke to others about my wit, humor and my ability to adjust my manner of speaking to the customer at hand -- gave me a 21 cent raise rather than the customary 25 cent raise. Why? Because I sometimes came to work "inappropriately dressed."

The stated dress code was business casual. Duh!

While I have been at my current retail job for three years and although there are no raises, it is wonderful not be reviewed.
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 31 Aug, 2010 09:30 am
That sort of rampant pettiness and misdirected discipline is why I am opposed to merit raises for teachers.
0 Replies
 
 

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