8
   

Dictionary

 
 
Svenja
 
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 08:06 am
I decide to buy a new English dictionary but I don't know which one is better,oxford or collins?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 8 • Views: 2,117 • Replies: 21
No top replies

 
Green Witch
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 08:09 am
@Svenja,
Do you really need the actual book? Can't you just use the on-line versions? I would think it be would be easier to find translations by doing a search with Google.
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 08:14 am
@Green Witch,
Chinese are quite limited in the sites they can access..

In addition, not everyone has internet access at home there.

A dictionary is a good thing to have at home.

Sadly, I cannot advise...
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 08:26 am
@Francis,
Wish I had known a year ago - I would have mailed him my Oxford for free.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 08:37 am
I couldn´t do without a dictionary. Have Webster and Oxford and others.
It is much easier and faster to look up things in a dictionary when you work at the computer than to go back and forth in internet. I have a dictionary next to me all the time and within reach in the bookcase depending what language I work with.
Not everything on the computer translates correct.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 08:44 am
The Oxford English Dictionary is huge, and would be quite expensive, although you'll never find a more comprehensive dictionary. The Shorter Oxford English Dictionary retails at Amazon-dot-com for $165.00, and it says that it ships in one to three months. The second edition of the Oxford English Dictionary is in 20 volumes, and the cost would probably be prohibitive. It is also available in CD-ROM discs.

The full 20 volume set is available in the United States for $995.00. The CD-ROM set is advertized at Amazon-dot-com for $116.95.

The Collins English Dictionary is listed on Amazon-dot-com (tenth edition, 2009) for about $40.00 US (i found it quoted in Canadian dollars, but that's a good ballpark figure). Collins would probably be the best option for you.

It appears that you want a dictionary of the British version of English. If you were to purchase a dictionary of the American language, i would advise that you look either for the American Heritage Dictionary, or the Merriam-Webster dictionary.

With a screen name of Svenja, i had always assumed you are Swedish. Did i get that wrong?
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 08:56 am
@Setanta,
I dream of one day owning the unabridged version of the OED (Oxford English Dictionary) http://i48.tinypic.com/2m5yt1k.jpg!
0 Replies
 
Svenja
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 09:44 am
@Setanta,
Thank you for your information! Svenja is a German name. It's suggested by my friend and she is learning German.
Svenja
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 09:47 am
@Green Witch,
Yes, i prefer a actual book.
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 10:20 am
@Svenja,
Svenja is a Swedish name, but there are not many by that name in Sweden. Only 37 women.
Svenja comes from the male name Sven. 116 958 men in Sweden has that name and 12 women.
Svenja is polular in Germany - especially in northern Germany.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 10:49 am
Like Saab, I much prefer to have a book at my side, rather than clicking from site to site to get a definition. Especially when you're in the middle of typing something, it's an aggravation to have to open another window. (For me, that is.)
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 01:21 pm
@Svenja,
Quote:
I've decided to buy a new English dictionary but I don't know which one is better,oxford or collins?


I'd go for the Collins CoBuild, Svenja.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=collins+cobuild&x=0&y=0
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 02:47 pm
@Svenja,
Svenja wrote:

Thank you for your information! Svenja is a German name. It's suggested by my friend and she is learning German.


Like saab said, Svenja is a Swedish name, not German, but it was once popular
in the northern parts of Germany where people are blond and blue eyed.

I have a great dictionary from England, very comprehensive, except it's
German-English.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 03:46 pm
@CalamityJane,
I don´t think that the northern Germans give their children a Swedish name because they are blond and blue eyed. I think names fit especially in Schleswig-Holstein with their Danish last names.
I can´t find that Svenja was that popular earlier.
Here one can find popular names in Germany according also to the different parts of Germany if you are interested.
http://www.beliebte-vornamen.de/
hamburgboy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 03:53 pm
@CalamityJane,
Quote:
Like saab said, Svenja is a Swedish name, not German, but it was once popular
in the northern parts of Germany where people are blond and blue eyed.



where has my BLOND hair gone Shocked ???
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 04:05 pm
@saab,
saab, from your link it says that Svenja was the most popular name for a girl
in 1990 (Der Vorname Svenja gehörte ca. 1990 zu den häufigsten Mädchennamen in Deutschland.)
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Dec, 2009 04:06 pm
@hamburgboy,
Hamburger, you still have your blue eyes though....one out of two ain't so bad, eh?
0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Dec, 2009 03:52 am
@hamburgboy,
I am not blond and blue eyed either.

Once on Sicily I and a friend took a cab. The driver had the bluest eyes one can imagen. Thinking that a Sicilian taxidriver could not speak or understand Swedish I said to my friend. "What beautiful blue eyes he has. "
He turns around and says in Danish "My mother is Danish"

0 Replies
 
saab
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Dec, 2009 03:53 am
@CalamityJane,
The latest is to name kids after names from Ikea furniture.
I know one poor person with the name Maren which happens to be a toiletseat at Ikea.
Svenja
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Dec, 2009 07:36 am
@saab,
Well, that's very interesting. I'll tell my friend.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Dictionary
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.09 seconds on 09/29/2022 at 11:36:46