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Has "per piece" been used properly?

 
 
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 07:00 am
I googled "newspaper per piece" and only got one result. I am not sure "per piece" has been used properly or not.

Context:
Yesterday a vendor at a main street in this city sold the special issue at price of 15 yuan per piece, while the original price is just 5 yuan. Some passers-by who bought the issue complained that it was too expensive. What did the female vendor replied to them? She said, "the space of this special issue to increase its value is capacious!" "If you don't buy it now, you can wait and will certainly pay more for it!" She added.
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 968 • Replies: 11
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contrex
 
  2  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 07:20 am
Single examples of printed items such as newspapers, magazines and books are usually called "copies". Also I have made a few alterations in the text you posted. I am not sure what the text in red is supposed to mean - it looks like it was translated by a computer program.

Yesterday a vendor at a main street in this city sold the special issue for 15 yuan per copy, while the original price was just 5 yuan. Some passers-by who bought the issue complained that it was too expensive. What did the female vendor reply? She said, "the space of this special issue to increase its value is capacious!" "If you don't buy it now, you can wait and will certainly pay more for it!", she added.
MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:21 am
You could just say, "for 15 yuan each", and "this special issue is sure to increase in value". I'd use "woman" instedad of "female" if you insist on putting in that rather rhetorical question in, or just say "What did the vendor reply? She...", since the "She" established the gender, so you don't need to specify it otherwise, which seems a little awkward.
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contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:27 am
I agree with Monterey Jack.
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oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:27 am
@contrex,
MJ has answered the text in red for me.
Thank you.
And thank MJ.
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MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:28 am
"15 yuan apiece" would also be more idiomatic.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:32 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
"the space of this special issue to increase its value is capacious!"


what is this supposed to mean?
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MontereyJack
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:52 am
I wonder if oristar was thinking of "There's a lot of room for this special issue to increase in value", but that's sort of an idiom, and you can't replace those words with "the space ...is capacious".
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:56 am
@MontereyJack,
I worked it around in my heads a few ways that could work, but none seemed quite right.

something along the lines of "there's potential for this special issue to increase in value" or opportunity or ...
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 08:58 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
while the original price is just 5 yuan


original - does that mean what the paper normally sells for? or does it mean that this issue was priced at 5 yuan by the producer, and this vendor marked it up to 15 yuan?

It's not clear from the original, and the meaning is quite different.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 07:17 pm
@MontereyJack,
Yes, you've taken the words out of my mouth.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2009 07:18 pm
@ehBeth,
Well analyzed.
It is "normally".
Thanks
0 Replies
 
 

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