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Bathroom Door Etiquette

 
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 04:09 pm
@Linkat,
You never do, unless you want millions of flies on your butt.
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 06:05 pm
@CalamityJane,
You got that right, CJ.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 29 Sep, 2009 06:09 pm
@CalamityJane,
It's the only way to make sure the wasps go away though..
0 Replies
 
CA dave
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 03:50 pm
@Merry Andrew,
The door is closed! Knock before you enter, but if it's occupied the door will be locked. How many safeguards against embarrassment are required? This is an aesthetic issue; who wants to look into a bathroom? Our guest bathroom is located along a central pathway of our house, and during parties I'm continually closing the door. Ugh!
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 04:00 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

Most bathrooms and water closets built in the United States, whether new construction or renovation, after the era of the Second World War have "exhaust fans" in them, so there isn't a problem of odor. If you grow up in a house full of people, as i did, then you learn to leave the door ajar because with so much use, it is important to know if the room is occupied.

Many 70's and 80's era homes do not have exhaust fans as part of the original construction in Austin.

Building codes in Austin require either an exhaust fan or an exterior window.

The house inspector advised me that it is not an issue of odor, but rather an issue of moisture. The exhaust fan (or open window) is meant to be used during showers, so that the moisture will not have to be removed by the air conditioner.

DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Jul, 2012 04:01 pm
@DrewDad,
And we keep the doors shut as a matter of course, as we've had small children for almost nine years now.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Jul, 2012 02:46 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

Setanta wrote:

Most bathrooms and water closets built in the United States, whether new construction or renovation, after the era of the Second World War have "exhaust fans" in them, so there isn't a problem of odor. If you grow up in a house full of people, as i did, then you learn to leave the door ajar because with so much use, it is important to know if the room is occupied.

Many 70's and 80's era homes do not have exhaust fans as part of the original construction in Austin.

Building codes in Austin require either an exhaust fan or an exterior window.

The house inspector advised me that it is not an issue of odor, but rather an issue of moisture. The exhaust fan (or open window) is meant to be used during showers, so that the moisture will not have to be removed by the air conditioner.




you said odor
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Jul, 2012 02:50 pm
@chai2,
It seemed more polite than "noxious fumes."
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Jul, 2012 12:29 am
@DrewDad,
We had a friend who was forever building on to his house...in all manner of crazy ways...had a neon sign on the roof he lit at parties, but I digress.

For the longest time the bathing facilities and toilet stood completely unenclosed in the middle of the living space. Could be seen from everywhere except bedrooms! It was always gay men who lived there and they apparently didn't mind. We women used to support each other by encircling the one using the Loo, facing out. If we had dresses it was easier. I always wore long tops or skirts if I knew I might be the only woman there.

I think most of the visiting guys went in the garden.
0 Replies
 
vacaben41
 
  2  
Reply Fri 12 May, 2017 11:22 am
@CalamityJane,
I can only think of two reasons to leave a restroom door closed at home.
One: a mental condition of the owner;
two; there is a window cracked open in the restroom for fresh air to circulate.
Otherwise, modern American and Canadian protocol is to leave the door open.
0 Replies
 
 

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