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why is a table leaf called a leaf?

 
 
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 08:09 pm
we were sitting around the dinner table tonight and my nephew asked why we call a table leaf a leaf. We didn't know the answer and I"m not finding anything on the internet about it.

Thanks for any help is greatly appreciated!
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Type: Discussion • Score: 8 • Views: 28,378 • Replies: 18
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 08:16 pm
@imdtckdkr,
I don't know either. Will wait for answers with you.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 08:46 pm
@imdtckdkr,
Well, what else would you call it?
0 Replies
 
ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 08:55 pm
Why is a tree leaf called a leaf?
0 Replies
 
imdtckdkr
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 09:06 pm
well....I was thinking that maybe since a leaf is an extension of the tree that maybe that's why. The extensino is a leaf of the table...therefore a leaf.... Surprised) circular reasoning?!?!?!? LOL
oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 09:08 pm
@imdtckdkr,
look up the etymology of leaf and then guess why it came to be
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 09:12 pm
@imdtckdkr,
http://www.word-detective.com/2008/08/14/leaves-table/

Quote...

"One of the uses to which “leaf” was put in the 15th century was to mean “a hinged part or a part attached at one edge by a hinge,” as a hinged flap on machinery, furniture or the like. For example, the parts of a “Dutch door” (also called a “stable door,” divided horizontally to allow opening the top half while the bottom remains closed) would be considered “leaves.”

By the 16th century, this sense of “leaf” was being applied to hinged sections of a table that hang down from the side but can be raised when more surface area is needed. Within a hundred years, this sense was expanded to include any movable element or addition to a table, such as the “leaves” that are inserted into the top of a table to increase its area."

0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 09:12 pm
I'm still working on "What came first, the chicken or the egg". Another good question would be why do they call those buttoned circular things at the end of a sleeve "cuffs", and why are the other things called sleeves?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 09:13 pm
@oolongteasup,
We all could do that. Why don't you just tell us?
0 Replies
 
2PacksAday
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 09:15 pm
@imdtckdkr,
imdtckdkr wrote:

well....I was thinking that maybe since a leaf is an extension of the tree that maybe that's why. The extensino is a leaf of the table...therefore a leaf.... Surprised) circular reasoning?!?!?!? LOL


That would be my guess as to why....since a leaf is an outgrowth or an extension.
0 Replies
 
imdtckdkr
 
  2  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 09:24 pm
etymology! I couldn't think of that word and I wasn't coming up with the right questions to ask in my searches. I also LOVE LOVE LOVE the link to the word detective sight! That will be a huge help in the future.

Thanks again to everyone for their input!
ebrown p
 
  2  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:34 pm
@imdtckdkr,
The word etymology comes from two different root words-- the word etus (which is where we get the word "Eat" means to "swallow"). The word "Mol" is an ancient word meaning hard (as in difficult).

So etymology is literally translated "things that are hard to swallow".
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:38 pm
@imdtckdkr,
WARNING WARNING WARNING

Do not take anything that ebrown p tells you seriously!

(I mean it, too.)
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:41 pm
@ebrown p,
As an aside, and apropos of nothing, when I was furthering my education at a university,in a freshman English composition course we were given the assignmen to write 'the biography of a word.' I chose etymology as my subject word and garnered an A.

Don't tell me what the etymology of etymology is. Twisted Evil Drunk
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:46 pm
@Merry Andrew,
Okay, that question has been answered. Now, why does a bicycle have two wheels.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:50 pm
@Merry Andrew,
I suppose now you'll tell me what ontology and epistemology are. I've been waiting all these years..
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 13 Aug, 2009 10:52 pm
@roger,
I figure that's for improved balance. Plus, since the word mentions bi, to fit the word.
0 Replies
 
Lance Coon
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 May, 2010 10:27 am
@Merry Andrew,
do you happen to remember the instructions for that assignment? I'm a teacher interested in creating something similar.
0 Replies
 
EngProf
 
  0  
Reply Thu 3 Sep, 2020 02:31 pm
@ebrown p,
Etymology is NOT defined as "things hard to swallow"! Please! You were joking, right?
Etymon is word or morpheme (stem/root) from the Greek word etumon meaning "true sense," and the suffix is derived from logia meaning "study of."
0 Replies
 
 

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