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A world with 1.3 billion old people by 2040

 
 
Reply Mon 20 Jul, 2009 05:02 am
Quote:
In the year 2040 - 1.3 billion senior citizens

Mon Jul 20, 2009

By Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The world's population of older people is growing at the fastest rate ever seen and the old will soon outnumber the young for the first time, U.S. researchers reported on Monday.

An aging population will push up pension and healthcare costs, forcing major increases in public spending that could slow economic growth in rich and poor countries.

The number of people 65 and older hit about 506 million as of midyear 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This will double to 1.3 billion by 2040, accounting for 14 percent of the total global population.

"People aged 65 and over will soon outnumber children under age 5 for the first time in history," said the report put together by Kevin Kinsella and Wan He of the U.S. Census Bureau.

"Aging is affecting every country in every part of the world," said Richard Suzman of the National Institute of Aging, which commissioned the report. "While there are important differences between developed and developing countries, global aging is changing the social and economic nature of the planet and presenting difficult challenges."

The report found that people aged 80 and older are the fastest growing portion of the total population in many countries. Globally, this "oldest old" population is projected to increase by 233 percent between 2008 and 2040.

This could strain their children and grandchildren.

"Shrinking ratios of workers to pensioners and people spending a larger portion of their lives in retirement increasingly tax existing health and pension systems," the report said.

"In a few years' time, just after 2010, the numbers and proportions of older people (especially the oldest old) will begin to rise rapidly in most developed and many developing countries," it added.

"The increase is primarily the result of high fertility levels after World War II and secondarily, but increasingly, the result of reduced death rates at older ages."

Chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer remain the top killers, especially of the elderly. This in turn means huge expense for healthcare systems.

And this will not only happen in the industrialized world.

"By 2040, today's developing countries are likely to be home to more than 1 billion people aged 65 and over, 76 percent of the projected world total," the report reads.

Each month, 870,000 people turn 65. In 10 years, 1.9 million people will celebrate their 65th birthdays each month.

If countries and businesses plan right, an aging population could create opportunities for economic growth, the report said.

But it also cited a 2006 European Commission report that found the costs of pensions, healthcare and long-term care will force major increases in public spending and force down gross domestic product growth rates.

"And in the absence of policy changes, the potential EU economic growth rate would be cut in half by 2030," the report cautioned.

Source


Since a couple of years industry, (print) media, business ... have discovered the (money of) old age citizens.

Investors have built senior homes, residences, etc and more able to make a ton of money.

We've here (in Germany) a mandatory long term care insurance (discussed now in the UK - in other countries it#s part of the health insurance), which covers at least most of the basic spendings you have as a senior.

But when I look at how long it took until every child of one, two years got (gets) a place in kindergarten - how long will it last that every citizen can be sure to have an affordable place to stay in her/his dotage?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 7 • Views: 3,194 • Replies: 7
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jul, 2009 05:47 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
The report found that people aged 80 and older are the fastest growing portion of the total population in many countries. Globally, this "oldest old" population is projected to increase by 233 percent between 2008 and 2040.


Wow. That is a LOT of very old people!
Yankee
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jul, 2009 06:35 am
@msolga,
Viagra!
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jul, 2009 07:16 am
@msolga,
Nice that I am going to have company............
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jul, 2009 08:58 am
@BillRM,
And the cry of "Hey, you kids! Get off my lawn!" was heard around the globe.
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jul, 2009 10:11 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
The world's population of older people is growing at the fastest rate ever seen and the old will soon outnumber the young for the first time [...]

Mind you, this assumes that this will be a constant. What if we get a major flu / virus pandemic? The very old and the very young are the first to die usually.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Jul, 2009 11:03 am
@Reyn,
True. But how would you include such if you make plans? Just take a certain average ...?

On the other hand, our figures here aren't as large as they would be without WWII.
0 Replies
 
vishal1
 
  0  
Reply Fri 30 Dec, 2016 04:39 am
Nice
0 Replies
 
 

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