47
   

Buying a new entry door

 
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 08:30 am
We haven't had doors made but we have used this company to make several screen/storm doors: http://www.coppawoodworking.com/

We wanted something very low profile so they wouldn't interfere with the lines of the house. We've been really happy with their doors. I know this doesn't answer your question but I thought it might help if you decided to buy storm doors seperately.
0 Replies
 
FreeDuck
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 08:41 am
4k sounds high to me but maybe not with included storm doors. I'd shop around a bit.

Listening intently as we need to replace both of our entry doors as well.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:03 am
Super-helpful so far, people, keep it coming!

I'm starting to get a mental handle on this though I have a ways to go. (Love those storm/ screen doors, boomer, they're gorgeous.)
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  3  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:07 am
Quote:
A 36-by-80-inch (.9 by 2 m) wood door can cost $275 to $3,500, depending on the type of wood, construction, finish and glazing. Paneled single fiberglass doors start at about $600, steel at about $200.


http://www.ehow.com/how_110384_choose-entry-door.html

A quick search online and I can find many steel entry doors for sale as low as $140, which is where I'd expect the low end to start given that you can buy an automobile in America for the prices being quoted for a simple door.

I'm not saying a sub-500 door is the way to go (after a quick search I would consider something like $800 a good deal for a door in the US), just that in comparison it seems that $2,000 is well in the upper range of prices for a steel door.
panzade
 
  2  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:23 am
@Robert Gentel,
Quote:
just that in comparison it seems that $2,000 is well in the upper range of prices for a steel door.
...don't forget that soz was including labor and locks when she posted the estimate.
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:33 am
@Robert Gentel,
It looks like it's the successive markups that are so crazy. Have a look, these guys have a list price of over $1,000 (on sale for over $700) for this door that looks an awful lot like this door for $137 wholesale.

0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:37 am
@panzade,
panzade wrote:
...don't forget that soz was including labor and locks when she posted the estimate.


I thought she said labor was $200, which sounds about right for American labor to install a door (it's pretty easy, I did it as a teen in half an hour when I locked myself in a room and had to take the door off its hinges to get out).
sozobe
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:42 am
@Robert Gentel,
It's locks and stormdoors too, not just the door itself. But yeah, I think it's definitely at the high end for the materials (i.e. steel rather than fiberglass or wood).

The company is itself high-end -- the doors are made locally, have a lifetime guarantee, etc. These doors are mid-to-low range for what they carry. Their wood doors are whoo tres expensive.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:49 am
@Robert Gentel,
Quote:
I thought she said labor was $200, which sounds about right for American labor to install a door (it's pretty easy, I did it as a teen in half an hour when I locked myself in a room and had to take the door off its hinges to get out).

Taking an interior hollow core door off it's hinges and replacing an entry door are very different tasks.
Although master carpenters in the midwest make an average of $25 an hour soz would be wise to hire a company that provides a warranty and of course covers the workman with workman's comp so she doesn't run the risk of a missing digit being covered by her homeowner's.
In addition, interior and exterior door trim will probably need replacing, unless they are removed without any damage.
FreeDuck
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:50 am
@panzade,
Doors are definitely a big deal to replace, which is why I still have my drafty, patched-to-the-hilt, 100 year-old door hanging. To replace it with something comparable would cost a lot and probably involve replacing the frame, at this point.
panzade
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 09:57 am
@FreeDuck,
Quote:
probably involve replacing the frame, at this point.


....there ain't no probably about it. To get the energy savings you deserve from a tight weatherproof door you have to replace it with an integrated unit.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Wed 24 Jun, 2009 10:26 am
@panzade,
That makes sense (that it is much more involved than an interior door) I hadn't thought about needing to replace frames. But it still sounds like $200 in labor is about right to me.
0 Replies
 
panzade
 
  1  
Wed 16 Sep, 2009 08:00 pm
any news on the front door?
0 Replies
 
alexhall
 
  1  
Tue 27 Sep, 2011 10:30 pm
@sozobe,
Hi Sozobe,
It was great discussion. Want to know whether how did you find the installation. Have you got the fire check doors?
0 Replies
 
AndrewJayden
 
  1  
Fri 30 Dec, 2011 05:35 am
I will also suggest you to check Lowes.
0 Replies
 
anniekassier
 
  1  
Mon 18 Jun, 2012 04:52 am
@eoe,
You should buy a good quality entry door
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Mon 18 Jun, 2012 06:15 am

I remember an uncle that I had years ago.
Most of the time, he was a very sensible guy.

At nite, he had a ritual that he performed like clockwork
before retiring to bed, which involved making sure
that his back door was locked. I pointed out to him,
more than once, that this was ineffective,
in that he had window panes right next to his door lock.

Accordingly, a burglar coud put a rubber suction cup
on the glass and cut around it with a glass cutter,
achieving silent entry; alternatively, a burglar
coud put duct tape on the glass and elbow it in,
having close and ez access to the doorlock.

The moral of the story is: windows and doorlocks = bad luck.

Maybe an opening for the mail (and a porthole) woud be OK,
if sufficiently far from the doorlock. U and your family shud be secure.





David
paulajackson
 
  0  
Mon 18 Jun, 2012 07:25 am
@sozobe,
4000 bucks seems to be a bit more expensive. You can check few online sites and then decide on the price factor.
0 Replies
 
sozobe
 
  1  
Mon 18 Jun, 2012 08:01 am
I forget what the final cost was, but we ended up getting a lot of the price knocked off. First, we didn't actually need storm doors (even though the two doors are exposed to the elements, they are steel and pretty much impervious, and there was no reason for additional storm doors).

I forget how much that brought down the price, but it was significant.

Second, we got a hefty energy credit for each of the doors. The old doors were terribly drafty, these are AWESOME. A huge difference in the winter.

They're also just aesthetically pleasing, fit right in. We have old wooden windows with leaded panes, this company was able to mimic the look really well. Most people didn't even notice that we replaced the doors at all -- they're just a much more solid, airtight, secure version of the nearly century-old doors we already had.

So, very happy with this overall.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Mon 18 Jun, 2012 10:30 am
@sozobe,
sozobe wrote:
I forget what the final cost was, but we ended up getting a lot of the price knocked off. First, we didn't actually need storm doors (even though the two doors are exposed to the elements, they are steel and pretty much impervious, and there was no reason for additional storm doors).
U r confident that u r safe from rust.




sozobe wrote:
I forget how much that brought down the price,
but it was significant.

Second, we got a hefty energy credit for each of the doors.
The old doors were terribly drafty, these are AWESOME.
A huge difference in the winter.

They're also just aesthetically pleasing, fit right in.
We have old wooden windows with leaded panes, this company was able to mimic the look really well.
Most people didn't even notice that we replaced the doors at all -- they're just a much more solid, airtight,
secure version of the nearly century-old doors we already had.

So, very happy with this overall.
I hope that no window glass
is within reach of the lock to your door. U deserve to be secure.





David
 

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