Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 03:04 pm
I have 2 photos accepted in a Pa photography show. Im gonna mess with the photos on Pshop (my secretary is good with pSHOP) Im thinking of screwing with the contrats and doing them in a sepia tone since they are of Amish kids. My question is , how do I mount a photo on board and frame for a show? . I do watercolors and temperas so Im familiar with the acid free mats and stuff. Is there a rule for photo mounting? In w/c we mount on a board and then mat on top .
I will show some of the photos that were NOT chosen (I submitted 9) , all I need to know is, also, how do I upload and download on to A2K. This will help with my project shots as I get em and put em up on my A2K journal about my retirement pitcher book.

The photos in the show have become the property of the show(Licensing stuff, I suppose, I havent read all the small print in the contract they sent).
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Type: Question • Score: 7 • Views: 4,634 • Replies: 21
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roger
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:39 pm
@farmerman,
I think you're going to have to load the from your computer to something like photobucket or flicker, then copy the "properties" and post to a2k, getting the code inside the "Img" brackets.

As to actually mounting photos for display, I haven't a clue.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:42 pm
@roger,
Yes, Photobucket walks you through the process.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:43 pm
@ossobuco,
On the other hand, re your writing/photography, you may want your own photo site where there is some copyright control.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 04:47 pm
@ossobuco,
ok thats good for the second part. My most immediate thingy is to get these ferschluginzer pitchers mounted right smart and blowd up real good.
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:10 pm
In photography classes I've taken in the past, we used what is called a dry-mount press. It basically is like a large panini press with smooth plates that is used to melt something akin to wax paper between the print paper and the card stock to meld them together.

http://www.trueart.info/hinging.htm

http://www.trueart.info/dry_mounting.htm

http://www.trueart.info/wet_mounting.htm

http://www.trueart.info/vacuum_mounting.htm

http://www.trueart.info/adhesives.htm


Here's a summary of the above all on one page:

http://www.framedestination.com/picture_frame_mounting.html

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:12 pm
@farmerman,
I'm sort of ignorant on pros and cons of whether to mount a photo to a board. and if so whether to do that myself of pay for the best place in town to do it - versus any other way of holding it in the frame. I am keen on having a strip of something, either a mat, or if you prefer not a mat, a piece of spacer (they come in bands about four feet long, have a sticky side that faces the frame, not the photo, and keeps the photo from resting on the glass or plexi. I would be keen to keep moisture out of the inner space of the framed photo - perhaps more of a concern by the ocean in northern california - thus securing backing with tape, all acid free yadda yadda.

I've two photos by pros, and they're both matted. Haven't taken them apart to see if they're attached to a backboard.

Thinking, there are also acid free hinge thingies, that you don't see, behind the photo.

Maybe Boomer will be along...


0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:17 pm
you can mount them basically the same way you would the watercolours, when i worked in framing, if we weren't mounting the pics like butterfly was talking about we would mount them the way you did the watercolours, usually using a T shaped tape configuration, on strip vertically sticky side up, with a strip horizontally at the top sticky side down, position the T's (one at each top corner) on the backing board so that the pic is centered to the matt opening
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:18 pm
@Butrflynet,
There's a series of how-to videos here on mounting, matting and framing black and white photos:

http://www.expertvillage.com/video/88180_framing-bw-photos-mounting.htm
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:20 pm
@djjd62,
Yeh, the hinge thingies.

I used to dry mount, but sort of have a nebulous instinct against doing it now.
(Don't trust me)
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:28 pm
First off -- YEAH YOU! Congratulations!

<clapclapclapclapclap>

I always just used spray can photo mount to adhere the photo to some ragboard, use a rubber roller to make sure it's really stuck (roll the backside of the board, not the photo), then put the mat over the top and stick it in a frame.. Pretty easy.

In the scrapbooking section of most craft stores they sell a product called "Glue Dots". Glue dots work great for sticking your photo to the backing (a bit more forgiving than spray mount) and for sticking your mats together.

Sometimes things are worth splurging on by using a professional framer and this might be one of those times -- your photos were selected to be in a photo show and that's way cool. If it were me I'd totally binge.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:40 pm
Thnks for all the advice everyone. Im gonna read all the link Bfly> Boomer, you think I should splurge? Ive been in AWS shows and did my own framing but it looks like photos take a slightly different tack (no pun).
The photos will be for sale and Id hate that my phirst photo phoot phorward were crappily done (by me and mrs F).

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 05:54 pm
@farmerman,
I just read in one of my books that some framers now use a system called a vacuum mount that takes all the air out inbetween the photo and the back board at the same time it positions them perfectly. Now I can't find that again.
Well, I'd ask at the best shop in your vicinity.. maybe more than one. Places vary. (There was a great place in Ferndale... superb aesthetic judjement, superb technique, when all else around was mediocre to poor.)
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 06:02 pm
I mount and frame all the stuff that's going to hang in the house -- mostly because I'm a cheapskate who has dozens upon dozens of empty frames left over from the studio days. I'm fairly good at it.

But at the studio I never showed anything that wasn't professionally framed. There is just something very "finished" about it.

If you get to keep the money from the sale, and you get to set the price, I'd splurge. You can just factor the framing cost into the price.

Photo framing is usually pretty sedate, and smallish, so it isn't all that expensive.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Feb, 2009 06:30 pm
@boomerang,
sedate! yeh. I had a 12X 16 wc framed for a client and the framing with a 5 inch double mat was nearly 700, but they wanted that frame. I balked and took the painting back cause the frame was a travesty, a piece of Victorian schlock that made my wc look like some pre raphealite monstrosity (these folks were Brandywine new money). So when I took it back and explained how I wanted the framing, they acceded to a smallish non gilt frame and made up a story about this tempermental artist who wished not to have his painting ornamented with a very tastefully large frame. Theyve bought 3 other paintings of my AMish kids series since then, (And I retain the print rights)
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2009 03:15 pm
Well, I mounted the photo on a rag board with two pieces of rag double stick tape. I cut a double mat of an ainner (black ) and an outer 4" mat of a off white linen. I stuck the whole thing into a black high gloss frame with UV glass> I must say it looks good. They hung the show and I must admit, my work is ao inferiror to the others. Most of the other photographers blew theirs up to a really big size and most were photoshopped to great effect. I like the shots of the barns (in color) with a b/w surround. Not too many colr pix. The best of the show (iMHO) was a portarit of a black african child with a fly on his face. The photo was full face with all of the(what look like) malaria and smallpox remnants. It was so moving.

I felt like pulling my work out because it wasnt good enough. I really have a lot to learn inphotography. I hope I can get it going. I talked with one of the judges who reviewed my work and she was supportive and gave me soime hints about what Photoshop Elements could do to "jazz it up".
Im gonna look into Photoshop . I wish there was a users site or an intro site where one could play and get Hooked. The judge said something encouraging about Photoshop, One can learn just what one needs and then use that as a tool until one needs something more. I like that . Thats how I learned to do airbrushing.
0 Replies
 
OCCOM BILL
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2009 03:36 pm
@farmerman,
Imageshack is superior for loading pics on A2K because the pics last longer. NOT imageshack.com... it's:

    To upload pics from your computer:
  1. Click -> http://www.imageshack.us/
  2. Tick the box that says "Upload Image" if it isn't already ticked by default.
  3. Hit "browse" to select your pic from your computer (hint: easy to find if you save it to your desktop).
  4. Robert will appreciate it if you check Resize Image and choose 640X480 (for message boards)
  5. Click "Host it!"
  6. Untick the box that says "Include details", then Copy "Hotlink for forums (1)" and paste it where you want to post the pic.
  7. Enjoy your new skill.

Ps. If you provide your email; the site will remember all of your pictures for a VERY long time... and won't ever spam you (to my knowledge. Been using it for many years.)

Pps. For more super cool computer tricks for dopes like me, Click Here

Ppps. Laughed out loud at your thread title. Well done.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2009 05:11 pm
@OCCOM BILL,
hey thanks for the imageshack site. When the show is over I will post the picture, (contract by show keeps image rights during show).
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2009 05:18 pm
@farmerman,
I'd be surprised if I wouldn't like your photo, farmer.

Me, I'm not all that keen on photoshopped photos as art. We used to show a lot of photographers and I'm pretty eye-rolling at tricks. Give me content and composition as interests, any day. But that's just my own point of view.


farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Mar, 2009 05:25 pm
@ossobuco,
Some of the photos were spectacular. You could see that they were "shopped" because in a few, the background sky was added and the lighting was not correct for the ground shadows. BUT NO MATTER WHAT, the photose were really neat
 

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