20
   

Mo and I get hassled by the Man.

 
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 10:34 am
@ossobuco,
Quote:

I can almost understand that, the compulsion part.
I figure that can happen on bridges, know it does in subway stations,
and it might, not for killing yourself but for a risk game, with railroad tracks.

I remember reading in a psychology textbook of obsessive-compulsive
disorder of a young woman who laid along the double yellow lines
of major roads, at night, for years until she got squashed by a truck.


0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  3  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 10:44 am
boom I don't think you were doing anything wrong.

I'm not so sure the cop would have made his speech about breaking the law and getting arrested if mo hadn't been there.

You know mo is smart. We know mo is smart.

The cop doesn't know if mo is bright enough to figure out not to play on tracks, or if he's some kid that will get facinated by the trains, the tracks and end up getting kilt.

There wasn't time for him to visit with you to and ascertain that mo knew these lessons already, so, he figured he throw out that bit of information to get his attention.

And it did.

I like to think I was a smart kid, but I know there was some stuff I would have done, dangerous stuff, that I didn't because I thought "the cops will arrest me for that."

We don't want our kids to fear the police, but part of their job is to instill some healthy respect/fear for the law. And if that respect/fear keeps kids away from railroad tracks, I think that's ok.

mo's intelligence aside, there's always a chance he could momentarily get careless. Maybe the thought of getting arrested may literally save his life....who knows?

I'm just sayin'.
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 02:15 pm
we used to cross a BIG railroad trestle over the James River in Lynchburg as kids. Every so often a train would come and we'd get stuck and have to hang on to some little platforms on the side that were placed here and there. A couple of times we barely made it to them on time. A couple of times we damn near got shaken off anyway. Kids. How the hell did we live?
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 02:22 pm
I forgot to mention that over the years...several kids were killed doing this dumb ****....me and friends were lucky...that's the trestle

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v288/stevetheq/trestle2.jpg
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 02:28 pm
@Thomas,
I agree completely with Thomas . . . obviously, all those folks with their minatory missives hate freedom . . .
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  2  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 02:45 pm
@Bi-Polar Bear,
I wonder why they didn't just build a walkway along the side, and put up barriers on the sides to ensure death to those who crossed on the top if a train passed?
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  2  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 02:50 pm
@DrewDad,
Quote:
One of my grandfathers died at a train crossing.



One of MY grandfathers died directing traffic around a dead mule.

Small world, isn't it?



Wait, is Hee Haw really on or not?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  3  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 03:17 pm
@Intrepid,
Could people stop quoting cjhsa?

By all means engage him if you wish, but I don't have to see him turning perfectly reasonable threads into cesspols if you don't quote him.
cyphercat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 03:20 pm
@Bi-Polar Bear,
Okay, Bear, which one is you?

http://beyondbeautybasics.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/07/standbyme.jpg
Setanta
 
  3  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 03:40 pm
I grew up with my grandparents, and my grandfather was a station master and telegrapher for the CB&Q. The house was right next to the railroad tracks, and the siding in that little town. (It was exactly midway between two cities with marshalling yards, and therefore the railroad had constructed quite an extensive siding there. Eastbound trains would drop cars for westbound trains to pick up, and vice-versa.)

http://www.placesonline.org/shared/content_objects/usa/illinois/NewYatesCityDepot.jpg

This it the depot at which my grandfather worked, which has now been restored. I discovered online that the depot had been moved to the city park (a distance of about 200 yards from its original location) and restored in 1989.

http://www.placesonline.org/shared/content_objects/usa/illinois/OldYatesCityDepot.jpg

This image, from about the time that my grandfather began to work for the railroad, is more reminiscent of the depot for me--this is how i always a saw it from the alley as i walked there from the house. The photographer in this photo would have been standing on the railroad crossing of the street which ran in front of our house, and would have been no more than 10 or 15 yards from the house.

On one of the rain forest threads long ago (years ago), i posted a picture i found of the railroad crossing right by my grandparents house, a picture from the 50s with an old coal burner just entering the crossing. You can't see the house, but i recognized the crossing. I couldn't find that picture today today.

There was a terrace between our lot and the tracks, and my grandfather once told me that the standard right-of-way had one rod of ground on either side of the track or tracks (a rod is 16 1/2 feet). We treated the terrace as a part of the property. My grandfather had seeded it with grass when Ronnie Reagn was a snot-nosed kid, and we mowed the terrace and painted the white picket fence that separated it from my grandmother's "Better Homes and Gardens" yard. The only time i ever heard my grandmother use profane language was in the 50s, when one of the coal-burners would come down the track, and she had laundry out on the line to dry. All the engineers knew her and my grandfather, and they would stop just to the west of the house, on the outskirts of town, and give serveral blasts on the shrill steam whistle, so she could come out and take her washing down off the line before they came into the siding, spewing soot and cinders. When they shoveled cinders from the trap under the fire box while they were in the siding, they would back the engine up by the terrace, and throw the cinders onto my grandfather's compost heap.

We grew up around the trains, and we would often walk on the tracks, but we knew we weren't supposed to do so. We got away with it keeping a look-out so we wouldn't get caught, and because we knew all the trains slowed down for the yard and siding in the stretch from the viaduct on the west side of town, and the viaduct on the east side of town. That gave us a half mile to the west, and somewhat over a mile on the east. We also had sense enough to get down off the tracks before the viaducts, and to stay off the tracks beyond the town. We did stand out by the picket fence (we were not allowed on the terrace when a train was coming through) and pump our arms up and down, so that the engineer would blow his whistle. The whistles of the coal-burners were quite different than the electric horns on the diesel engines. I wish i had found that other photo, because you would probably be appalled. At the railroad crossing by our house, the only one in town where the grade was flush with the street, there were no lights, there were no gates. People just knew to stop and look both ways. About the only time anybody would get any interest in hotrod drivers was when they blasted across the crossings without stopping to look. Then someone would call the constable to say something to the effect of: "You know Bobby Jones, the son of that bum Henry Jones? Well i just saw him tearing over the crossing by the park . . . that's right, that red Chevy, you know the one."

Literally generations of small children would stand at the dining room window, which overlooked the the terrace and the siding, and watch the trains breaking down and making up. The sounds of the shunts winding up, and the crash of the cars being rammed together, while the gandy-dancers went up and down with the breakman, hooking up the pneumatic couplings after the cars had been pushed together--it was a fantastic baby-sitter for toddlers, who would watch by the hour; it was better than television.

Mostly we learned to be careful by getting caught being foolish, and getting our backsides tanned.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 03:48 pm
@Setanta,
I was tempted to walk down the tracks too, when I was young.

I didn't realize until years later that I was supposed to keep off the tracks to I wouldn't get hauled off into the bushes and raped.
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 03:49 pm
@cyphercat,
huh?
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 03:57 pm
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

Could people stop quoting cjhsa?

By all means engage him if you wish, but I don't have to see him turning perfectly reasonable threads into cesspols if you don't quote him.

This cannot be reiterated too much.

Now then. Who's going to excoriate me for quoting dlowan?
dlowan
 
  0  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 04:19 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

dlowan wrote:

Could people stop quoting cjhsa?

By all means engage him if you wish, but I don't have to see him turning perfectly reasonable threads into cesspols if you don't quote him.

This cannot be reiterated too much.

Now then. Who's going to excoriate me for quoting dlowan?


Stop COPYING ME!!!!

MUUUUUUUM.......he's COPYING me!!!!


Happy?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 04:34 pm
@Setanta,
That was nice to read, Set.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 04:55 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

I was tempted to walk down the tracks too, when I was young.

I didn't realize until years later that I was supposed to keep off the tracks
to I wouldn't get hauled off into the bushes and raped.

Was it possible to walk with the tracks between u n the bushes ?
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 05:29 pm
That was a nice read, Setanta. Thanks.

And thanks to those of you who didn't make me feel like some kind of irresponsible monster.

I was talking to Mr. B about the reaction to this thread. He thinks that by the time the current little kids are making the laws that children will have to be completely enclosed in cotton batting and giant hamster balls before their allowed to leave the house.

<sigh>

I promise not to include Mo in any activity that might be deemed dangerous.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 05:31 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
bushes on both sides david, and I'm sure anyone hiding in them could have grabbed a little girl.

I was too young to know about that at the time I suppose.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 05:50 pm
@boomerang,
http://www.reelingreviews.com/bubbleboypic.jpg
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 05:52 pm
@chai2,
chai2 wrote:

bushes on both sides david,
and I'm sure anyone hiding in them could have grabbed a little girl.

I was too young to know about that at the time I suppose.

Reminds me of something I saw on TV:
someone said that when he was 7,
he was out riding his bike, after dinner.
A pervert grabbed him off of his bike
and cut his throat, from ear to ear,
then left him for dead,
after cutting off his penis and taking it with him.

I coud not help but ardently wish that the victim
had been armed and that the good guy had defeated evil.





David
0 Replies
 
 

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