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Radical Islamic Militant Somali Pirates!

 
 
dagmaraka
 
  5  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 03:01 pm
@cjhsa,
you are right. the simple, like you, are a mystery to me. often i am convinced they must be faking it...but you always prove you are genuine. kudos for consistency.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 05:16 pm
More insanity--there is now a report that Blackwater is offering to escort merchantmen through those waters. The tanker that was taken was more than 400 miles from the east African coast--so it's no longer just coastal cruising by the pirates, and sailing around the Cape of Good Hope won't necessarily save you. The professional navies of the world are really the only ones who can deal with this now--the cost of private security firms for escorts would be prohibitive. At that rate, it would be cheaper to fly goods to the destination than to ship them.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 19 Nov, 2008 09:01 pm
If any of the pirates sing, "Ho, ho, ho and a bottle of rum" we know they then cannot be Muslims (that do not drink alcohol). If any start singing from Peter Pan (Captain Hook) we could sprinkle them with pixie dust.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 06:21 am
@Setanta,
Im refining my protection strategy a bit more. How does 3 Apache gunships in a decktop[ hangar sound? Easily done on a tankers capacious surface area.
The Indian Navy had attacked and sunk a "pirate Mothah ship" yesterday. The ship had served as a supply and manpower depot (and I suppose weapons cache) . Im surprised at the logistics and oreganization that these criminals are showing.
Sooner or later, like many times in the past, someone will get tired of paying out ransoms and will loosen their navies to swat these hornets.
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  0  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 06:49 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:

According to Jane's Terrorism and Security Monitor, certain insurgents are using pirates to smuggle weapons and supplies and help provide bases in return. (Subscription - report mentioned on the BBC, see link above.)


The BBC reports additionally::
Quote:
BBC Somalia analyst Mohamed Mohamed says such pirate gangs are usually made up of three different types:

• Ex-fishermen, who are considered the brains of the operation because they know the sea
• Ex-militiamen, who are considered the muscle - having fought for various Somali clan warlords
• The technical experts, who are the computer geeks and know how to operate the hi-tech equipment needed to operate as a pirate - satellite phones, GPS and military hardware.




Well, duh. Thanks for that Walt!
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 06:55 am
@Setanta,
I know the situation regarding pirates is more complex than it seems, but one cannot deny there is a common link between doctors in the British National Health Service trying to bomb Glasgow Airport, a thirteen year old rape victim being stoned to death and a group of cut throats stealing a very large cargo of oil.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 12:15 pm
@Steve 41oo,
It is worth noting that the petroleum was not the target, but rather that these jokers are more interested in either getting high quality electronics they can flog on the black markets of other nations, or they want to hold the crews, cargoes and vessels for ransom. I would suggest that the ransom was the motive in taking the Saudi tanker.

This is in line with historical practice in piracy, too. Pirates of the 17th and 18th centuries were not interested in the ship's cargoes, unless they were easily and quickly "re-sellable." They were usually not even interested in ransoms, since that would expose at least some of them to the authorities in the areas in which they operated. Chiefly, they were interested three things--food and water (obvious), rum and specie (gold and silver coins).

As Walter's post points out, these jokers are probably financed by and organized by organized criminal organizations. The fact that there are Somali militiamen is neither sinister nor surprising. Somalia has been a failed state since 1990. The "Blackhawk Down" incident in Mogadishu was a case of the U.S. (stupidly) going after the clan leader Mohammed Farrah Aidid. When the Special Forces and Delta Force jokers had to fight their way out, militiamen from all over town, from all the clans, came running to take their pot shots at the Americans.

Somali militiamen, like just about everyone else in Somalia, are unemployed. However, they are armed, and they have little to nothing to lose. The organized crime which this piracy represents may pay "protection money" to the Muslim leaders to have a free hand and a safe have, and clan militiamen may have a hand in that, and provide "security services" in situ. It would a silly mistake, however, to associate this with Muslim fundamentalist militancy.
mysteryman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 05:56 pm
It looks like the EU is finally going to do something for themselves regarding defense...

http://www.dnaindia.com/report.asp?newsid=1205168

Quote:
BRUSSELS: The European Union formally launched on Monday an anti-piracy security operation off the coast of Somalia -- its first ever naval mission -- the EU’s French presidency said.

Dubbed Operation Atalanta, the mission was endorsed by the block’s defence ministers at talks in Brussels. EU ships will also help protect UN and other vulnerable vessels seeking to transport aid into strife-torn Somalia.

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 20 Nov, 2008 09:48 pm
It's about damn time. The Saudi tanker was taken more than 400 miles off the coast of Kenya. They need substantial resources to make this work--and shore patrols and patrolling the sea lanes will not suffice. They'll need a lot of blue water resources widely deployed. It is that kind of thoroughness i despair of. I noted that the Indian frigate was patrolling the Gulf of Aden, which is a long damn way from the Indian coast, but perfectly sensible to protect their shipping and shipping bound for India. Let us hope the Europeans are equally as intelligent in their use of their resources.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 05:52 am
http://i33.tinypic.com/2i9q9zq.jpg
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 06:59 am
@Setanta,
So our Special Ops and Delta Forces are "jokers"?

Who knew?
0 Replies
 
cjhsa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 07:18 am
Dag, how do you like your crow prepared?

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,433322,00.html

MOGADISHU, Somalia " A group of Somali pirates who have hijacked a tanker loaded with military supplies say they will fight to the death before giving in to Russian and U.S. authorities.

The superpowers have been unable to end the standoff and remain concerned that the ship's cargo of 33 tanks and other weapons could fall into enemy hands.

But a local official reported that the pirates turned down a demand from Islamist insurgents for some of the arms.

The tense situation off the coast of Somalia began 11 days ago when the pirates took control of the Ukrainian vessel MV Faina.

They have asked for a ransom of about $22 million, or 11 million British pounds, to release the 21 Ukrainian, Latvian and Russian hostages and the cargo.

"If we are attacked we will defend ourselves until every last one of us dies," Sugule Ali, a spokesman for the pirates, said in an interview over satellite telephone from the ship.

"We only need money and if we are paid, then everything will be OK," he said. "No one can tell us what to do."

Ali's words came as U.S. warships continued to surround the ship and American helicopters buzzed overhead.

A Russian frigate is also expected to arrive within days.

It may come as some comfort to authorities that the group reportedly refused to hand over arms to the al Shabaab group, which opposes Somalia's interim government.

But the outcome of the stand-off remains uncertain.

Somali pirates have seized more that 30 vessels off the coast of their country so far this year.

They have received ransoms of between $20 million and $32 million, according to a report by British think tank Chatham House released earlier this week.

Residents confirmed fears that ransom payments to pirates were being passed onto the Islamist movement and were fueling the insurgency against President Abdullahi Yusuf's government.

But despite the frequency of such incidents, pirates rarely hurt their hostages.

One Russian has reportedly died aboard the Faina, apparently of illness.

Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 07:44 am
@cjhsa,
Quote:
Residents confirmed fears that ransom payments to pirates were being passed onto the Islamist movement and were fueling the insurgency against President Abdullahi Yusuf's government.


Of course you are aware that ... <how could I get THAT idea?>
cjhsa
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 07:47 am
@Walter Hinteler,
English please Ozzie.....
0 Replies
 
parados
 
  2  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 08:15 am
@cjhsa,
So.. let me get this straight cjhsa.. A turban makes someone an islamic extremist and the name "Hussein" makes them a muslim. What does that make someone named Abdullahi Yussuf?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 08:28 am
@parados,
Actually, it's Abdullahi Yusuf Ahmed - but that would irritate our cjhsa-man even more.

It is, however, notable that cjhsa obviously is a friend of the Somali Salvation Democratic Front ...
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 09:03 am
@Walter Hinteler,
The shipping company Maersk is sending all of its oil tankers and not so fast cargo ship around Cape Horn instead of using the Suez Canal since this week (100 ships per month).

This is the actual situation at Port Fujayrah (United Arab Emirates):

http://i36.tinypic.com/30skb37.jpg

Mainly oil tankers (about 30) - and the majority wont sail through the Suez Canal according to their owning companies.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 09:27 am
@cjhsa,
Quote:
Somalis in the diaspora - especially in Kenya, the United Arab Emirates, Canada and the UK - finance the pirate gangs and keep a large chunk of the ransom money, estimated at more than £20m this year alone, far more than Puntland's annual budget. But the gangs of gunmen sometimes split hundreds of thousands of pounds between them.

In the region's bigger towns, such as Garowe and Bosasso on the Gulf of Aden coast, a successful hijack is often celebrated with a meal and qat-chewing session at an expensive hotel.

One successful pirate based in Garowe, Abshir Salad, said: "First we look to buy a nice house and car. Then we buy guns and other weapons. The rest of the money we use to relax."

The pirates appear to have little fear of arrest by the weak administration, who many suspect of involvement in the trade. By spreading the money to local officials, chiefs, relatives and friends, the pirates have created strong logistical and intelligence networks, and avoided the clan-based fighting that affects so much of the rest of the country.

And though few believe the pirates when they claim to be eco-warriors or marines defending Somali waters from foreign exploitation, their daring and wealth has earned them respect. It has become something of a tradition for successful pirates to take additional wives, marrying them in lavish ceremonies.

Naimo, 21, from Garowe, said she had attended a wedding last month of the sort "I had never seen before".

"It's true that girls are interested in marrying pirates because they have a lot of money. Ordinary men cannot afford weddings like this," she said.
Source
0 Replies
 
DrewDad
 
  0  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 09:37 am
@cjhsa,
cjhsa wrote:

Why bother? You can't understand the simple.

-ton.
cjhsa
 
  -2  
Reply Fri 21 Nov, 2008 10:29 am
@DrewDad,
Are you really that stupid?
0 Replies
 
 

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