14
   

Fried onions. Do tell.

 
 
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 04:42 pm
Got to give the recipe I used for last night's dinner, and leftovers..
Skip this if you don't like lemon with onions. I kinda do, both in my faux remoulade onion thing (with of all things, mustard), and in this recipe, to follow.

This is from a foodblog (flog, to me) that I had to add to my bookmark bar, Dinners for a Year and Beyond.
http://dinnersforayear.blogspot.com/2008/07/dinner-121-garlic-lemon-shrimp-and-orzo.html

copying the photo, not sure it will stick, but the photo attracted me..
http://bp0.blogger.com/_m5G9dZGbZ90/SI5bBobSaRI/AAAAAAAAAsk/Elm5qwZY2g8/s1600-h/shrimporzo+010.JPG

This is the post -
Like many food bloggers, I spend an inordinate amount of time reading, developing, and testing recipes. I love to grocery shop. The fiction that I read is somehow about food. I watch culinary television shows. My cookbooks and magazines overflow my shelves.

I have found a way to share my passion for all things food, make a little cash while I'm at it, and not work crazy restaurant hours. As a personal chef, I help hungry families gather around the dinner table with a meal that doesn't come in a flat, cardboard box.

My business allows me get to know a family well. I plan and shop for their groceries. I cook in their home anywhere from 3 - 6 hours. I know what foods they like and what they don't like. Kids are running through the kitchen. Dogs are looking for a handout. As the name implies, it is a personal job. I would have to say this is a dream job for me. I love cooking for my family and now I get to share my passion for good food with others.

Today I cooked for a client that I have had for over a year. This family is an ideal client in that they are up for trying new recipes and foods. Also, for the most part, they let me pick their menus. One of their selections for a dinner this week was Garlic Lemon Shrimp and Orzo.

A white wine sauce enhanced with onions and garlic is used to poach the shrimp. Parsley and Parmesan and a pat of butter enrich the sauce before it is tossed with orzo. A filling yet light meal that will be enjoyed by your family and friends alike.

Garlic Lemon Shrimp and Orzo

serves 6

2 cups orzo, cooked al dente and drained
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 1/2 cups onions, diced
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 lemon, juiced and zested
1 cup white wine
salt, to taste
pepper, to taste
1 tablespoon butter
2 pounds of shrimp, 21 - 25 count, peeled and deveined
1/3 cup parsley, chopped
2/3 cup Parmesan cheese, grated

In a large saute pan, heat olive oil. Add onions and cook for about 5 - 6 minutes or until they are soft but not brown. Add the garlic and cook for an additional minute.

Add the lemon juice, zest, and wine. Bring to a boil then reduce the heat and cook for 2 - 3 minutes to meld the flavors together. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Stir in pat of butter until melted.

Add the shrimp and cook until just cooked through, about 4 - 5 minutes. Toss shrimp and sauce with the orzo, parsley and Parmesan. Serve with extra cheese.



Osso-
I didn't add the cheese, an anathema to me with fish/shellfish. Might be good to the less biased palette, and even ital chefs are playing with it now.
I used only 3/4 lb medium sized shrimp (less work to peel that the tinys - and I'd be asleep standing peeling two pounds - also, cheaper) and only, say, 1 1/4 cups of orzo. Everything else the same - ok, maybe I added only 1 and 1/2 chopped medium onion.

This tasted wonderful. The basic flavours worked. And it was easy. Comfort food, even.


ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 04:43 pm
@ossobuco,
Oh, well, the photo didn't carry. It'll show on the blog site.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 04:47 pm
@ossobuco,
I'm allergic to crustaceans, but I think this could be nicely made with chicken or mebbe pork. I love both with onion and citrus combos. Hmmm, or mebbe a firm piece of fish.


(I thought I was alone in the fish/cheese nose-wrinkle)
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 04:48 pm
@ehBeth,
Beth, can you do monkfish?

(poor man's lobster)
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 04:52 pm
@Rockhead,
Yes, monkfish is a good idea.

Shrimp, crab, lobster are the potential killers for me. I miss that soft-shelled blue crab for sure.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 04:55 pm
@ehBeth,
I die if I don't get a good Dungeness at least once a year...
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 04:59 pm
@ehBeth,
Nah, italians from italy have been strong against that for as long as I've read, which is pretty long by now. Repulsion, signs in restaurants about not doing that (though I haven't seen those, but then I don't usually go to the tourist magnets). But a few chefs are playing. I'm sure this would work with a nice firm-ish white fish.

Thinking, I remember a restaurant on Sepulveda south of Culver in WLA called Rincon Criollo. Simple cuban fare but simple in the best way. Serious roast chicken... but I never got that since I was mad for the halibut, grilled and served on a bed of sauteed onions, with a side of black beans. One of those combinations of flavors that work as a blend..


ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 05:02 pm
@ossobuco,
One of my standard roast chicken preps involve lemons and onions and garlic stuffed into the cavity. mmmmmm
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 05:04 pm
@Rockhead,
I like monkfish too. Harvey called it Lotte (however you spell that).

Dungeness crab, soon I'll be crying.

But, with this dish, I dunno. First of all, I'd think of it as crab wasting. We had a vietnamese chef friend, well, he was till he switched to chinese five years or so after he came to the US, since his family was from (starts with C, I forget)...
anyway, he did crab in a wok with the perfect simple flavoring, maybe having to do with mustard. All you had to do was add cold good beer and a bunch of napkins.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 05:06 pm
@ehBeth,
Me too, indeed that might be a Hazan recipe, except that she didn't make up italian food out of whole cloth, is/was a kind of recorder.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 05:29 pm
@ossobuco,
funny, I think of that as a Chinese variant (chicken/lemon/onion/garlic). Hadn't really thought of the Italian possibilities, but they're there - just different herbs under the skin.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 05:35 pm
@ehBeth,
Yea. Because the flavours (I'm going over to the english spelling which I've always liked) make sense together.. chinese, italian, french...morrocan?

I've food memories where things went together but were still detectible as separate, sort of ping ping ping ping ping, but not.. disjointed.

Of course, no one should listen to me, as I have an extremely diminished sense of smell. It may be that what gets through to me best are certain fruitful mixes.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 07:22 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:
Just a couple of nice onions sliced, in a pan with some garlic and some kinda grease. Mebbe one sweet onion in the mix. But really plain old fried onions do the trick.

Have you tried pouring some red wine on them after they've fried some time?

For some reason, I can't stop eating parsley once I've started. It's technically a spice, not a veggie, but sometimes I just forget about the meal they're supposed to spice up and just eat parsley by the bundle.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 07:30 pm
@Thomas,
Thus my craving for parsley pesto.. not saying parsley isn't good by itself.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Oct, 2008 07:31 pm
@ossobuco,
and the parsley thread

http://able2know.org/topic/78816-1
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2008 09:56 am
@ossobuco,
http://images.ladypb298.multiply.com/image/3:plantspetspeople/photos/105/600x600/7/7-prize-winning-onions.jpg?et=XmGRc5GxiAa7vaQO61LNYQ&nmid=151055067

prize-winning onions from the Royal Winter Fair

they'd go well with

championship garlic

http://images.ladypb298.multiply.com/image/6:plantspetspeople/photos/105/600x600/2/2-prize-winning-garlic-on-a-plate.jpg?et=rs7hIUasrqMRU9MmRBFJuQ&nmid=151055067

a Guinness record rutabaga

http://images.ladypb298.multiply.com/image/2:plantspetspeople/photos/105/600x600/14/14-guinness-world-record-rutabaga.jpg?et=L12TXEE1T0zHdShU4gClpg&nmid=151055067

or mebbe some nice fingerling taters

http://images.ladypb298.multiply.com/image/6:plantspetspeople/photos/105/600x600/5/5-fingerling-potatoes.jpg?et=Cf3igOb10KcdJRIBeU3%2BRw&nmid=151055067

ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2008 10:01 am
@ehBeth,
Great pictures, Beth. Some of my favorite foods..
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2008 10:10 am
@ossobuco,
I've got a couple more for you and msOlga - root veggies for another thread Cool
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Sat 20 Dec, 2008 05:33 pm
@ehBeth,
Hot damn, it's root vegetable pr0n.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 03:26 pm
@jespah,
Warning, warning, I'm about to link the ultimate carmellized onion recipe (to me)..
soon as I find it again.
 

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