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Text of Draft Proposal for Bailout Plan

 
 
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:36 pm
LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL FOR TREASURY AUTHORITY TO PURCHASE MORTGAGE-RELATED ASSETS

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/21/business/21draftcnd.html

Let's read and discuss.
 
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:38 pm
LEGISLATIVE PROPOSAL FOR TREASURY AUTHORITY

TO PURCHASE MORTGAGE-RELATED ASSETS

Section 1. Short Title.

This Act may be cited as ____________________.

Sec. 2. Purchases of Mortgage-Related Assets.

(a) Authority to Purchase.--The Secretary is authorized to purchase, and to make and fund commitments to purchase, on such terms and conditions as determined by the Secretary, mortgage-related assets from any financial institution having its headquarters in the United States.

(b) Necessary Actions.--The Secretary is authorized to take such actions as the Secretary deems necessary to carry out the authorities in this Act, including, without limitation:

(1) appointing such employees as may be required to carry out the authorities in this Act and defining their duties;

(2) entering into contracts, including contracts for services authorized by section 3109 of title 5, United States Code, without regard to any other provision of law regarding public contracts;

(3) designating financial institutions as financial agents of the Government, and they shall perform all such reasonable duties related to this Act as financial agents of the Government as may be required of them;

(4) establishing vehicles that are authorized, subject to supervision by the Secretary, to purchase mortgage-related assets and issue obligations; and

(5) issuing such regulations and other guidance as may be necessary or appropriate to define terms or carry out the authorities of this Act.

Sec. 3. Considerations.

In exercising the authorities granted in this Act, the Secretary shall take into consideration means for--

(1) providing stability or preventing disruption to the financial markets or banking system; and

(2) protecting the taxpayer.

Sec. 4. Reports to Congress.

Within three months of the first exercise of the authority granted in section 2(a), and semiannually thereafter, the Secretary shall report to the Committees on the Budget, Financial Services, and Ways and Means of the House of Representatives and the Committees on the Budget, Finance, and Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the Senate with respect to the authorities exercised under this Act and the considerations required by section 3.

Sec. 5. Rights; Management; Sale of Mortgage-Related Assets.

(a) Exercise of Rights.--The Secretary may, at any time, exercise any rights received in connection with mortgage-related assets purchased under this Act.

(b) Management of Mortgage-Related Assets.--The Secretary shall have authority to manage mortgage-related assets purchased under this Act, including revenues and portfolio risks therefrom.

(c) Sale of Mortgage-Related Assets.--The Secretary may, at any time, upon terms and conditions and at prices determined by the Secretary, sell, or enter into securities loans, repurchase transactions or other financial transactions in regard to, any mortgage-related asset purchased under this Act.

(d) Application of Sunset to Mortgage-Related Assets.--The authority of the Secretary to hold any mortgage-related asset purchased under this Act before the termination date in section 9, or to purchase or fund the purchase of a mortgage-related asset under a commitment entered into before the termination date in section 9, is not subject to the provisions of section 9.

Sec. 6. Maximum Amount of Authorized Purchases.

The Secretary’s authority to purchase mortgage-related assets under this Act shall be limited to $700,000,000,000 outstanding at any one time

Sec. 7. Funding.

For the purpose of the authorities granted in this Act, and for the costs of administering those authorities, the Secretary may use the proceeds of the sale of any securities issued under chapter 31 of title 31, United States Code, and the purposes for which securities may be issued under chapter 31 of title 31, United States Code, are extended to include actions authorized by this Act, including the payment of administrative expenses. Any funds expended for actions authorized by this Act, including the payment of administrative expenses, shall be deemed appropriated at the time of such expenditure.

Sec. 8. Review.

Decisions by the Secretary pursuant to the authority of this Act are non-reviewable and committed to agency discretion, and may not be reviewed by any court of law or any administrative agency.

Sec. 9. Termination of Authority.

The authorities under this Act, with the exception of authorities granted in sections 2(b)(5), 5 and 7, shall terminate two years from the date of enactment of this Act.

Sec. 10. Increase in Statutory Limit on the Public Debt.

Subsection (b) of section 3101 of title 31, United States Code, is amended by striking out the dollar limitation contained in such subsection and inserting in lieu thereof $11,315,000,000,000.

Sec. 11. Credit Reform.

The costs of purchases of mortgage-related assets made under section 2(a) of this Act shall be determined as provided under the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, as applicable.

Sec. 12. Definitions.

For purposes of this section, the following definitions shall apply:

(1) Mortgage-Related Assets.--The term “mortgage-related assets” means residential or commercial mortgages and any securities, obligations, or other instruments that are based on or related to such mortgages, that in each case was originated or issued on or before September 17, 2008.

(2) Secretary.--The term “Secretary” means the Secretary of the Treasury.

(3) United States.--The term “United States” means the States, territories, and possessions of the United States and the District of Columbia.

0 Replies
 
Debra Law
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:45 pm
Wow. The Secretary of the Treasury has been anointed "God Almighty" with discretion to spend billions of dollars any way he chooses and his decisions may not be reviewed by any court of law or any administrative agency.
cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:47 pm
@Debra Law,
That's exactly what I feared. They talked about oversight, but where?
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:48 pm
@cicerone imposter,
Another screwing of the nation appears to be taking shape.
0 Replies
 
Debra Law
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:49 pm
@cicerone imposter,
CI wrote: "That's exactly what I feared. They talked about oversight, but where?"

I'm in utter shock.
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:53 pm
I don't see ANY of the protections in the written bill that our representatives have been talking about on television.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:55 pm
@Debra Law,
I'm not; if you have seen my other postings on this issue, our government has done very little correctly. This is another example of their incompetence, and I'm talking about both parties.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:55 pm
The whole thing was more than 100 pages.
Debra Law
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:55 pm
@Miller,
give us the link
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:56 pm
If you don't like what's printed, be sure to give Barney Frank a call.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:56 pm
@Miller,
What difference does that make; 10-pages or 10,000 pages?
0 Replies
 
Debra Law
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 03:59 pm
I'm searching for a link to legislation; the draft proposal copied above was Paulson's original proposal. (OMG. I was starting to panic!)
Debra Law
 
  2  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 04:02 pm
McCain, Obama tentatively support bailout plan
Reuters | Monday, 29 September 2008
_____________________________________

Republican John McCain and Democrat Barack Obama have tentatively supported the US$700 billion plan to bail out the US financial system.

"This is something that all of us will swallow hard and go forward with," McCain said on ABC's This Week. "The option of doing nothing is simply not an acceptable option."

"My inclination is to support it," said Obama, his Democratic rival in the November 4 US presidential election.

"While I look forward to reviewing the language of the legislation, it appears that the tentative deal embraces these principles" the Illinois senator said on CBS' "Face the Nation," referring to requirements he said needed to be in the package.

Congressional negotiators announced early on Sunday they had reached tentative agreement on a compromise deal that altered key parts of a Wall Street bailout programme initially proposed by the Bush administration.

Both candidates refused to be pinned down on the economic plan during their first presidential debate on Friday. By Sunday, with a tentative deal in place, each gave general support with comments that the taxpayers had to be protected.

Later at a rally in Detroit, Obama called the bailout an "outrage." "But we have no choice," he said in prepared remarks. "We must act now. Because now that we're in this situation, your jobs, your life savings and the stability of our entire economy are at risk."

Supporters tried to play up their candidate's roles.

Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina told "Fox News Sunday" said Arizona Sen. McCain played a "decisive" role in getting balky House Republicans to focus on negotiating a compromise. McCain cut his campaign short last week to return to Washington to deal with the crisis at a White House meeting.

But Democratic Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts told the same programme it was Obama who took the lead at that meeting while McCain remained silent.

McCain resumed his campaign the next day so that he could attend the debate in Mississippi. Early same-night snap polls generally showed Obama winning the first of three encounters between the two nominees.

McCain tried to paint Obama as naive and too inexperienced to be president, a tactic Obama shrugged off as a "debating trick."

McCain has been criticised as condescending toward Obama and for refusing to look at his Democratic opponent during the debate. McCain called the criticism "foolishness."

"I've been in many, many debates," he said. "And a lot of the times I don't look at my opponents because I'm focusing on the people and the American people that I'm talking to. That's what the debate's all about."

The two debate again on October 7. Before that, the two vice-presidential nominees " Republican Governor Sarah Palin of Alaska and Democratic US Sen. Joe Biden of Delaware " will face off next Thursday.

That debate is expected to attract a large television audience. Palin has excited the conservative base of the Republican Party and her newness on the national scene has raised public interest in the person who would be next in line for the presidency.

Plus, both candidates have misspoken or given less-than-elegant answers to questions, raising the possibility of a misstep that could alter the campaign.

McCain shrugged off criticism of Palin, especially that she is too inexperienced in foreign affairs.

"I'm so excited about the reaction that Sarah Palin has gotten across this country, huge turnouts, enthusiasm, excitement," he said. "She knows how to communicate directly with people. They respond in a way that I've " that I've seldom seen."

Obama ducked questions about whether he thought Palin was qualified to be president.

"I think it's important for the American people to make a judgment based on what they hear from Sarah Palin herself," he said. "I think that I'm more concerned about the fact that she doesn't seem to have any differences with President Bush and would continue the same policies."

cicerone imposter
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 04:08 pm
@Debra Law,
Debra, I'm a very old man; you trying to kill me? LOL
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 04:09 pm
@cicerone imposter,
I'm not so young myself. LOL
0 Replies
 
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 04:11 pm

Rescue bill released
Legislation details plan to enact historic bailout of nation's financial system.
___________________________

NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- The federal government would provide as much as $700 billion in a far-reaching plan to rescue the nation's troubled financial system, according to a bill posted online by leading Democratic lawmakers on Sunday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she hopes the House will take up the bill on Monday. Sen. Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said he hopes the Senate might be able to vote on Monday as well - and no later than Wednesday.

Pelosi said the provisions added by Democrats will protect taxpayers from having to pay for the bailout.

"We sent a message to Wall Street - the party is over," she said at a press conference with Reid and other Democratic leaders from the House and Senate.

The core of the bill is based on Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson's request for authority to purchase troubled assets from financial institutions so banks can resume lending and so the credit markets, now virtually frozen, can begin to operate more normally.

But Democrats and Republicans - concerned about the potential taxpayer cost - have added several conditions and restrictions. Key negotiators for the financial rescue plan will be busy trying to line up votes on Capitol Hill on Sunday to support the accord they reached soon after midnight.

Among the provisions of the draft bill:

The $700 billion would be disbursed in stages, with $250 billion made available immediately for the Treasury's use.

Curbs will be placed on the compensation of executives at companies that sell mortgage assets to Treasury. Among them, companies that participate will not be able to deduct the salary they pay to executives above $500,000.

An oversight board will be created. The board will include the Federal Reserve chairman, the Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, the Federal Home Finance Agency director and the Housing and Urban Development secretary.

Treasury is allowed the option to take ownership stakes in participating companies under certain circumstances.

Treasury may establish an insurance program - with risk-based premiums paid by the industry - to guarantee companies' troubled assets, including mortgage-backed securities, purchased before March 14, 2008.

One provision requires the president to propose legislation to recoup losses from the financial industry if the rescue plan results in net losses to taxpayers five years after the plan is enacted.

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson first announced the administration would seek an economic bailout plan on Sept. 18, after meeting with key lawmakers in the House and Senate - a meeting that left lawmakers looking ashen when they spoke to the press afterwards.

If enacted, the rescue plan would be the most dramatic and extensive government intervention in the economy since the Great Depression. President Bush on Sept. 24 gave a prime-time address to the nation in which he urged lawmakers to pass his plan and warned that the "entire economy is in danger."

The aim of the rescue is to unfreeze the credit markets - short-term lending among banks and corporations. The core of the problem is bad real estate loans that have led to record foreclosures when the housing bubble burst and home prices declined.

In the past two weeks, the banking world and Wall Street have been reordered by a wave of collapses and corporate mergers. The most recent development was the seizure by federal regulators on Thursday night of Washington Mutual, once the nation's largest thrift and a major mortgage lender.

Pain on Main Street, risk to taxpayers

The chill of the credit freeze has been felt far beyond Wall Street, as well. Businesses large and small have seen the cost of borrowing spike higher.

At the same time, the scale of the administration's plan - and the quick pace of the debate over it - has given pause to many Americans and lawmakers worried about its potential cost to taxpayers.

"We begin with a very important task, a task to stabilize the markets, to protect all Americans - and do it in a way that protects the taxpayer to the maximum extent possible," Paulson said early Sunday morning.

0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  3  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 04:12 pm
@cicerone imposter,
September 28, 2008

Sunday, September 28, 2008; 12:23 PM



Section-by-section breakdown of the "Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008," otherwise known as the $700 billion Wall Street bailout bill.

The 106-page bill established sweeping powers for Treasury Secretary Hank Paulson, and his successor, in carrying out what the bill calls the "Troubled Asset Relief Program," whose acronym is TARP.

SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS OF THE LEGISLATION

Section 1. Short Title.
"Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008."

Section 2. Purposes.
Provides authority to the Treasury Secretary to restore liquidity and stability to the U.S. financial system and to ensure the economic well-being of Americans.

Section 3. Definitions.
Contains various definitions used under this Act.

Title I. Troubled Assets Relief Program.

Section 101. Purchases of Troubled Assets.
Authorizes the Secretary to establish a Troubled Asset Relief Program ("TARP") to purchase troubled assets from financial institutions. Establishes an Office of Financial Stability within the Treasury Department to implement the TARP in consultation with the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the FDIC, the Comptroller of the Currency, the Director of the Office of Thrift Supervision and the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

Requires the Treasury Secretary to establish guidelines and policies to carry out the purposes of this Act.

Includes provisions to prevent unjust enrichment by participants of the program.

Section 102. Insurance of Troubled Assets.
If the Secretary establishes the TARP program, the Secretary is required to establish a program to guarantee troubled assets of financial institutions.

The Secretary is required to establish risk-based premiums for such guarantees sufficient to cover anticipated claims. The Secretary must report to Congress on the establishment of the guarantee program.

Section 103. Considerations.
In using authority under this Act, the Treasury Secretary is required to take a number of considerations into account, including the interests of taxpayers, minimizing the impact on the national debt, providing stability to the financial markets, preserving homeownership, the needs of all financial institutions regardless of size or other characteristics, and the needs of local communities. Requires the Secretary to examine the long-term viability of an institution in determining whether to directly purchase assets under the TARP.

Section 104. Financial Stability Oversight Board.
This section establishes the Financial Stability Oversight Board to review and make recommendations regarding the exercise of authority under this Act. In addition, the Board must ensure that the policies implemented by the Secretary protect taxpayers, are in the economic interests of the United States, and are in accordance with this Act.

The Board is comprised of the Chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Director of the Federal Home Finance Agency, the Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development.

Section 105. Reports.
Monthly Reports: Within 60 days of the first exercise of authority under this Act and every month thereafter, the Secretary is required to report to Congress its activities under TARP, including detailed financial statements.

Tranche Reports: For every $50 billion in assets purchased, the Secretary is required to report to Congress a detailed description of all transactions, a description of the pricing mechanisms used, and justifications for the financial terms of such transactions.

Regulatory Modernization Report: Prior to April 30, 2009, the Secretary is required to submit a report to Congress on the current state of the financial markets, the effectiveness of the financial regulatory system, and to provide any recommendations.

Section 106. Rights; Management; Sale of Troubled Assets; Revenues and Sale Proceeds.
Establishes the right of the Secretary to exercise authorities under this Act at any time. Provides the Secretary with the authority to manage troubled assets, including the ability to determine the terms and conditions associated with the disposition of troubled assets. Requires profits from the sale of troubled assets to be used to pay down the national debt.

Section 107. Contracting Procedures.
Allows the Secretary to waive provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation where compelling circumstances make compliance contrary to the public interest. Such waivers must be reported to Congress within 7 days. If provisions related to minority contracting are waived, the Secretary must develop alternate procedures to ensure the inclusion of minority contractors.

Allows the FDIC to be selected as an asset manager for residential mortgage loans and mortgage-backed securities.

Section 108. Conflicts of Interest.
The Secretary is required to issue regulations or guidelines to manage or prohibit conflicts of interest in the administration of the program.

Section 109. Foreclosure Mitigation Efforts.
For mortgages and mortgage-backed securities acquired through TARP, the Secretary must implement a plan to mitigate foreclosures and to encourage servicers of mortgages to modify loans through Hope for Homeowners and other programs. Allows the Secretary to use loan guarantees and credit enhancement to avoid foreclosures. Requires the Secretary to coordinate with other federal entities that hold troubled assets in order to identify opportunities to modify loans, considering net present value to the taxpayer.

Section 110. Assistance to Homeowners.
Requires federal entities that hold mortgages and mortgage-backed securities, including the Federal Housing Finance Agency, the FDIC, and the Federal Reserve to develop plans to minimize foreclosures. Requires federal entities to work with servicers to encourage loan modifications, considering net present value to the taxpayer.

Section 111. Executive Compensation and Corporate Governance.
Provides that Treasury will promulgate executive compensation rules governing financial institutions that sell it troubled assets. Where Treasury buys assets directly, the institution must observe standards limiting incentives, allowing clawback and prohibiting golden parachutes. When Treasury buys assets at auction, an institution that has sold more than $300 million in assets is subject to additional taxes, including a 20% excise tax on golden parachute payments triggered by events other than retirement, and tax deduction limits for compensation limits above $500,000.

Section 112. Coordination With Foreign Authorities and Central Banks.
Requires the Secretary to coordinate with foreign authorities and central banks to establish programs similar to TARP.

Section 113. Minimization of Long-Term Costs and Maximization of Benefits for Taxpayers.
In order to cover losses and administrative costs, as well as to allow taxpayers to share in equity appreciation, requires that the Treasury receive non-voting warrants from participating financial institutions.

Section 114. Market Transparency.
48-hour Reporting Requirement: The Secretary is required, within 2 business days of exercising authority under this Act, to publicly disclose the details of any transaction.

Section 115. Graduated Authorization to Purchase.
Authorizes the full $700 billion as requested by the Treasury Secretary for implementation of TARP. Allows the Secretary to immediately use up to $250 billion in authority under this Act. Upon a Presidential certification of need, the Secretary may access an additional $100 billion. The final $350 billion may be accessed if the President transmits a written report to Congress requesting such authority. The Secretary may use this additional authority unless within 15 days Congress passes a joint resolution of disapproval which may be considered on an expedited basis.

Section 116. Oversight and Audits.
Requires the Comptroller General of the United States to conduct ongoing oversight of the activities and performance of TARP, and to report every 60 days to Congress. The Comptroller General is required to conduct an annual audit of TARP. In addition, TARP is required to establish and maintain an effective system of internal controls.

Section 117. Study and Report on Margin Authority.
Directs the Comptroller General to conduct a study and report back to Congress on the role in which leverage and sudden deleveraging of financial institutions was a factor behind the current financial crisis.

Section 118. Funding.
Provides for the authorization and appropriation of funds consistent with Section 115.

Section 119. Judicial Review and Related Matters.
Provides standards for judicial review, including injunctive and other relief, to ensure that the actions of the Secretary are not arbitrary, capricious, or not in accordance with law.

Section 120. Termination of Authority.
Provides that the authorities to purchase and guarantee assets terminate on December 31, 2009. The Secretary may extend the authority for an additional year upon certification of need to Congress.

Section 121. Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program.
Establishes the Office of the Special Inspector General for the Troubled Asset Relief Program to conduct, supervise, and coordinate audits and investigations of the actions undertaken by the Secretary under this Act. The Special Inspector General is required to submit a quarterly report to Congress summarizing its activities and the activities of the Secretary under this Act.

Section 122. Increase in the Statutory Limit on the Public Debt.
Raises the debt ceiling from $10 trillion to $11.3 trillion.

Section 123. Credit Reform.
Details the manner in which the legislation will be treated for budgetary purposes under the Federal Credit Reform Act.

Section 124. Hope for Homeowners Amendments.
Strengthens the Hope for Homeowners program to increase eligibility and improve the tools available to prevent foreclosures.

Section 125. Congressional Oversight Panel.
Establishes a Congressional Oversight Panel to review the state of the financial markets, the regulatory system, and the use of authority under TARP. The panel is required to report to Congress every 30 days and to submit a special report on regulatory reform prior to January 20, 2009. The panel will consist of 5 outside experts appointed by the House and Senate Minority and Majority leadership.

Section 126. FDIC Enforcement Enhancement.
Prohibits the misuse of the FDIC logo and name to falsely represent that deposits are insured. Strengthens enforcement by appropriate federal banking agencies, and allows the FDIC to take enforcement action against any person or institution where the banking agency has not acted.

Section 127. Cooperation With the FBI.
Requires any federal financial regulatory agency to cooperate with the FBI and other law enforcement agencies investigating fraud, misrepresentation, and malfeasance with respect to development, advertising, and sale of financial products.

Section 128. Acceleration of Effective Date.
Provides the Federal Reserve with the ability to pay interest on reserves.

Section 129. Disclosures on Exercise of Loan Authority.
Requires the Federal Reserve to provide a detailed report to Congress, in an expedited manner, upon the use of its emergency lending authority under Section 13(3) of the Federal Reserve Act.

Section 130. Technical Corrections.
Makes technical corrections to the Truth in Lending Act.

Section 131. Exchange Stabilization Fund Reimbursement.
Protects the Exchange Stabilization Fund from incurring any losses due to the temporary money market mutual fund guarantee by requiring the program created in this Act to reimburse the Fund. Prohibits any future use of the Fund for any guarantee program for the money market mutual fund industry.

Section 132. Authority to Suspend Mark-to-Market Accounting.
Restates the Securities and Exchange Commission's authority to suspend the application of Statement Number 157 of the Financial Accounting Standards Board if the SEC determines that it is in the public interest and protects investors.

Section 133. Study on Mark-to-Market Accounting.
Requires the SEC, in consultation with the Federal Reserve and the Treasury, to conduct a study on mark-to-market accounting standards as provided in FAS 157, including its effects on balance sheets, impact on the quality of financial information, and other matters, and to report to Congress within 90 days on its findings.

Section 134. Recoupment.
Requires that in 5 years, the President submit to the Congress a proposal that recoups from the financial industry any projected losses to the taxpayer.

Section 135. Preservation of Authority.
Clarifies that nothing in this Act shall limit the authority of the Secretary or the Federal Reserve under any other provision of law.

Title II--Budget-Related Provisions

Section 201. Information for Congressional Support Agencies.
Requires that information used by the Treasury Secretary in connection with activities under this Act be made available to CBO and JCT.

Section 202. Reports by the Office of Management and Budget and the Congressional Budget Office.
Requires CBO and OMB to report cost estimates and related information to Congress and the President regarding the authorities that the Secretary of the Treasury has exercised under the Act.

Section 203. Analysis in President's Budget.
Requires that the President include in his annual budget submission to the Congress certain analyses and estimates relating to costs incurred as a result of the Act; and

Section 204. Emergency Treatment.
Specifies scoring of the Act for purposes of budget enforcement.

Title III--Tax Provisions

Section 301. Gain or Loss From Sale or Exchange of Certain Preferred Stock.
Details certain changes in the tax treatment of losses on the preferred stock of certain GSEs for financial institutions.

Section 302. Special Rules for Tax Treatment of Executive Compensation of Employers Participating in the Troubled Assets Relief Program.
Applies limits on executive compensation and golden parachutes for certain executives of employers who participate in the auction program.

Section 303. Extension of Exclusion of Income From Discharge of Qualified Principal Residence Indebtedness.
Extends current law tax forgiveness on the cancellation of mortgage debt.

Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 04:20 pm
Text of bailout proposal posted to Web site

Quote:
The plan was posted to the House of Representatives Financial Services Committee Web site at financialservices.house.gov. The site appeared to have trouble loading after news of the posting was announced.


http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26884523/

I can't access the site. Everyone in the whole world must be trying to get a peak at the proposed legislation.

0 Replies
 
Debra Law
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Sep, 2008 04:21 pm
@firefly,
Thanks for information, firefly.
0 Replies
 
 

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