Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 12:32 pm
What's a good recipe?
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 12:43 pm
@Bella Dea,
here is a whole stack of recipes :

http://www.tilapia.ws/tilapia-recipe.php

personally i find the taliapa rather a bland fish .
one of my favourites is the "monk fish" ( one of the angler fishes ) . it's a rather ugly looking fish but panfried fillets are quite delicious - the flesh is solid , white and tasty .

http://www.neighborhoodmarket.org/UserFiles/Image/monkfish.jpg

at the fish market they'll sell it to you without the head (it's all mouth - reminds me of some a2k posters - won't name names <GRIN> ) .
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 01:38 pm
I like it because it is so mild. I hate fishy fish.
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 02:18 pm
@Bella Dea,
Quote:
I like it because it is so mild. I hate fishy fish


i don't like fish that tastes like panfried cardboard .
i don't like smelly or stinky fish - it's has to pass the "smells fresh" test , but i like it to have some flavour .
we find that most kinds of frozen fish fall into the category of "frozen cardboard" and we haven't bought any in a long time .
most frozen fish - even if caught in U.S. and canadian waters - makes it way back to this continent via china - where it's packaged and shipped - that's a long way before it reaches our table .
we like nothing better than buying fresh fish in such places as murrells inlet (myrtle beach) , where it's caught in the morning and by noon - afternoon at the latest - it's in the frying-pan .
enjoy your tilapia , bd !
hbg
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 02:37 pm
I picked this up today at Whole Foods so I am sure it will be yummy. Smile
Cliff Hanger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 02:56 pm
@Bella Dea,
Whole Foods-- expensive, but fresh.

I'd cook it up in some peanut oil (can withstand high heat) with garlic, and mushrooms.

Serve it over pasta, with a good grated cheese and some hot pepper.

You know it's not healthy to cook with Olive Oil?
0 Replies
 
Bella Dea
 
  3  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 02:59 pm
No way! Why not?
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 03:14 pm
@Bella Dea,
it turns the good kind of cholesterol into the bad kind - it's just been a topic of discussion on a food board

don't heat up the olive oil
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 25 Sep, 2008 03:33 pm
@ehBeth,
That's interesting, I'll try to read up on that. I cook with olive oil all the time and have high "good" cholesterol. And there is the famous mediterranean diet..

But I'm open to learning I'm wrong on this. I wonder if it is related to intense heat as opposed to simmering. Or not. Thanks for the heads up.

On tilapia, I've cooked it in a way I liked it, will have to go search on that.
I consider Albuquerque "fish hell". We do have new Whole Foods a little closer to my house, but still quite a jaunt.
0 Replies
 
Cliff Hanger
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Sep, 2008 05:40 am
@Bella Dea,
my knowledge on why it's bad to put burner/electrical heat to Olive Oil is because it breaks down-- this guy explains it better--

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=movie&dbid=6
ossobuco
 
  3  
Reply Fri 26 Sep, 2008 03:21 pm
@Cliff Hanger,
I couldn't understand that fellow..
but I never heat olive oil to smoking. Will have to read more.

I never did find my own tilapia recipe, but there's a recipe in today's Fine Cooking newsletter

Vietnamese Tilapia with Turmeric & Dill
http://www.taunton.com/cms/uploadedimages/images/cooking/articles/issues_91-100/051095094-01-vietnamese-tilapia.jpg

ingredients

2 Tbs. granulated sugar
2 Tbs. fresh lime juice
2 Tbs. Asian fish sauce
1/2 tsp. minced jalapeno
6 medium scallions
1 small bunch fresh dill (about 3/4 oz.)
2 tilapia fillets (about 12 oz. total)
1/2 tsp. ground ginger
1/4 tsp. ground turmeric
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 Tbs. canola oil
how to make

In a small bowl, combine the sugar and lime juice and stir until the sugar has dissolved. Add the fish sauce and jalapeno. Set aside.

Trim the scallions and cut them into 2-inch-long pieces. Quarter the white and light-green pieces lengthwise; leave the dark-green pieces whole. Cut the dill into 2-inch-long pieces (you should have about 1/2 cup).

Pat the fish dry with a paper towel. Sprinkle the ginger, turmeric, 1/4 tsp. salt, and a few grinds of black pepper all over the fillets.

Heat the oil in a 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add the tilapia and cook, flipping once, until just firm and opaque in the center of the thickest part, about 4 minutes total. Transfer the tilapia to two serving plates.

Add the scallions to the pan and cook, stirring frequently, until they just start to wilt, about 45 seconds. Add the dill and continue to cook until it has wilted slightly, about 15 seconds more. Pile the scallions and dill over the tilapia and serve the sauce on the side for drizzling.

From Fine Cooking 95, pp. 94a
September 1, 2008
photo: Scott Phillips
ehBeth
 
  2  
Reply Fri 26 Sep, 2008 07:57 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
but there's a recipe in today's Fine Cooking newsletter
Shocked Laughing Cool
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 26 Sep, 2008 08:15 pm
@ehBeth,
mmm? (I've gotten the newsletter for (probably) years now, but didn't check into the food discussion until recently, thanks to your good advice, ehBeth..

(or did you post the recipe already and somehow I missed it..)
0 Replies
 
Cliff Hanger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 29 Sep, 2008 05:33 am
@ossobuco,
Even if you don't take the olive oil to smoking it's still breaking down. Peanut Oil is better.
0 Replies
 
 

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