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binding limitations on ...

 
 
fansy
 
Reply Sat 13 Sep, 2008 06:29 pm
Quote:
In recent years the U.S. government has not set a good example, having abandoned the Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty; binding limitations on testing nuclear weapons and development of new ones; and a long-standing policy of foregoing threats of "first use" of nuclear weapons against nonnuclear states.


What does "binding" mean in the above context? Is it used as a transitive verb in "binding limitations"?
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Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2008 02:44 am
@fansy,
It means "legally binding". The text is claiming that the US removed itself from legally binding treaties and suggesting that it did not have the legal right to do so.
fansy
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2008 06:35 am
@Robert Gentel,
Quote:
In recent years the U.S. government has not set a good example, having abandoned the Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty; binding limitations on testing nuclear weapons and development of new ones; and a long-standing policy of foregoing threats of "first use" of nuclear weapons against nonnuclear states.


It's the two semicolons that confuse me. Can I understand the sentence this way:
The US has not set a good example--
1) it has abandoned ABM;
2) it has abandoned the limitations on testing nuclear weapons and development of new ones that are legally binding;
3) it has abandoned a long-standing policy of foregoing threats of "first use" of nuclear weapons against nonnuclear states.

I am afraid I have missed the logic of Jimmy Carter's sentence because his use of the semicolon.

What do you think?
fansy
 
  2  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2008 06:14 pm
@fansy,
Quote:
In recent years the U.S. government has not set a good example, having abandoned the Anti-Ballistic Missile treaty; binding limitations on testing nuclear weapons and development of new ones; and a long-standing policy of foregoing threats of "first use" of nuclear weapons against nonnuclear states.


How is the word "binding" used grammatically in this context? This is another question I have in mind.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Sep, 2008 06:20 pm
@fansy,
Quote:
... binding limitations on testing nuclear weapons ...

How is the word "binding" used grammatically in this context? This is another question I have in mind.


It's a present participle used as an adjective, Fansy.
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