12
   

Polish "jokes" came from Nazi propaganda

 
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 03:14 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Oui, mais dans la réalité, le français donne un bisou à la suédoise et une baffe au belge..
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 04:19 pm
@Francis,
I was told that joke by a Lorrainer . . .
Ragman
 
  2  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 06:59 pm
@Setanta,
carefull..with a Lorrainer..that could be the quiche of death.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 24 Jan, 2009 07:00 pm
@Ragman,
That is really low, low humor . . .



I salute you ! ! !
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 08:45 am
@Setanta,
Thanks, Setanta! As many have said, I'm full of it!
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:08 am
@georgeob1,
georgeob1 wrote:
Have you heard any of the "Gringo" jokes Mexicans tell about Americans?

Laughing

I'm sure the Poles had their German jokes just like those; I am also sure it's a good thing most Germans didn't understand them.
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:22 am
@Thomas,
oooh, ever read Three Men on the Bummel? (you can read it on Guttenberg for free: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/2183)

I have never laughed so hard in my life as when the three gents in the book go skiing in Germany.... One of my top 5 books for sure.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:36 am
@dagmaraka,
Thanks for the tip! I'll check it out.

Speaking of tips, here's a quick tangent about another tip of yours that I don't know where else to post: I finally got to check out the Town Hall Deli in South Orange that you recommended to me over a year ago. Those Sloppy Joes -- divine!

(Bookmarking "Three Men on the Bummel".)
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:39 am
@Thomas,
OH!!!!! I miss them so!!!!
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:43 am
@Thomas,
Since I had to read that in school, and since I afterwards defended Thomas et.al. from e.g. the Poles invading us from the sea, I really liked Three Men in a Boat better.
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:49 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Three Men in a Boat? That sounds like the title of an old Heinz Ruehman film. Or maybe Heinz Erhardt. Is it?
0 Replies
 
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 09:50 am
@Walter Hinteler,
well, that's pretty much Volume 2. I love bicycles and their experimenting with various contraptions and inventions was riotous. The boat was funny as well, but i think the bikes won in my book.

defending thomas from poles coming from the sea? what? you mean since you worked on boats? aha...i think i'm getting it. yes, bikes for me.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 25 Jan, 2009 10:06 am
@dagmaraka,
Navy, and I was conscripted - that had nothing at all to do with "work". Wink
0 Replies
 
literarypoland
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Mar, 2009 04:30 pm
Poles don't have negative jokes about any nation.
Why? It's like political correctness in the US. Why insult someone without reason?
Anyway, people in the West (further West) have a distorted image of the Polish nation.
Even look at Mexico - inside Mexico, Mexicans control and run the whole country. Mexicans are top politicians, judges, teachers, police chiefs and so on. The same here. That's why I'm still here, not somewhere abroad.
Maybe those jokes are a method of dissuading Poles from emigration - that would make sense, because Poles should build Poland in their own country.
However, foreign companies have a heavy presence here - so many Poles are now Mexicans in our own country.
Lots of intellectuals here, but they are not practical and consumption-oriented. Maybe Poles are seen as easy prey by street-smart foreigners.
Recently British banks have won a dirty currency game against the remaining purely Polish companies.
patiodog
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Mar, 2009 04:49 pm
@literarypoland,
Yeah, so, I don't know about Europe, but almost NO ONE in the United States cares about Poland or its people whatsoever -- not about Polish emigration, not about Polish politics, not about Polish literature. Even those who tell Polack jokes.

Sorry.
dagmaraka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Mar, 2009 01:44 am
@literarypoland,
literarypoland wrote:

Poles don't have negative jokes about any nation.


you have got to be kidding. or live in a bunker without access to other Poles, perhaps.
literarypoland
 
  0  
Reply Fri 13 Mar, 2009 02:37 am
@patiodog,
Patiodog, I'm sorry for you. This means that Americans live in isolation and don't care about the rest of the world, even its potential enemies. Like a hamster in his cage.
I understand that America as a large country occupies a large part of one's brain, just to grasp its complexity.
But to be proud that one doesn't know other cultures - well, simpletons abroad.
literarypoland
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Mar, 2009 03:22 am
@dagmaraka,
Highly sociable Dagmaraka.

OK, I've found some Polish-German stereotypes (from Gazeta Wyborcza):

Poles joke frequently, even in serious, official situations, while Germans are very stiff.

1944, Cracow. A young Hitlerjugend member comes in a street across a Polish worker. The German wants to shoot at the Pole, but hears a voice: "Don't do it, he's a future Pope, and you will be his successor..."

During a general audience, the Polish secretary of Benedict XVI disappeared somewhere. Then an old German priest recollected some words in Polish and wrote them for the Pope on a piece of paper. The Pope says to the Polish pilgrims: "Defenders of the Polish post office! Come out, you're surrounded!" (First days of the war in Gdansk; and the Pope has phonetic messages which he reads from the balcony)

True story: a Polish woman lives in Berlin. She found an apartment through a real estate agent.When they were signing the contract, the guy says to her: "You know, additionally there is a deposit, 1000 Euro, but you will get it back when you dissolve the contract with me". The Pole said jokingly: "Unless I destroy everything, true?" Then the guy got highly frightened: "What do you mean? You are planning this?"
(Just a joke based on exaggeration)
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Mar, 2009 05:59 am
@literarypoland,
Listen. You posit grandiose notions, such as "Maybe those jokes are a method of dissuading Poles from emigration - that would make sense, because Poles should build Poland in their own country."

Polish jokes are disseminated throughout the United States, but Polish immigration (from our point of view) is not at all a concern here. So clearly the jokes are not some great cultural method to keep Poles in their homeland -- at least not any more, and I doubt they were, except in the sense that a lazy social scientist might think of it.

For what it's worth, I'm inclined to agree with your assessment of the US's collective ignorance of the rest of the world. But as someone who claims to translate American novels, your ignorance of our culture is shocking. How can you possibly translate the literature of a culture you clearly do not understand?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Mar, 2009 06:43 am
@patiodog,
The basic premise of the thread is absurd. Polish jokes were common in the United States long before the National Socialist party existed in Germany.
0 Replies
 
 

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