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ETHNIC RECIPE-Golupki (Golumpki)

 
 
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 06:58 pm
Time for some comfort food. Our cabin in Maine was busted into this summer and my big family cookbook was stolen (don't ask) along with some lesser important possessions. SO, Im looking for a good golumpki recipe
My dad's moms recipe had ground veal/pork/ and beef and several ground and cooked veggies including onion and red and green bell peppers. Rice that was only slightly cooked an then the cabbage was filled. Then this was cooked in a tomato sauce .
I have the general idea but the details are gone from my head.
I seem to recall some paprika and apple chunks in the oven pan with the "pigeons"
Anybody out there hve a good recipe?
Anybody near Eastport Maine find a VINCENT PRICE cookbook with a vat amount of ethnic recipes in the back, Ill pay a reward f its my mom's transcription of busha's recipes
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 07:05 pm
@farmerman,
I don't have any recipes, but we called them gowompkis

farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 07:09 pm
@chai2,
The L with an "oin" (a little cross line through the L like an arrow , makes the L sound like a W). So the word can be HAWOOPKI or GOWUMPKI
Everybody knows that.

But Ill bet you didn't know that auctioneers make louy grocery store clerks.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 07:26 pm
@farmerman,
"and my big family cookbook was stolen (don't ask) ...."

Maybe he was a chef for a robber baron?

Nothing surprises me when it comes to unusual stuff getting snaffled. I had a burglar on my books once who stole the family rottweiller, among other things.
He took it in to his local nick after three days, as the dog had not only eaten him out of house and home, but wrecked the furniture in his living room.

I hope your family book turns up, fm.

ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 08:07 pm
@farmerman,
We've got a former Abuzzer who lives very close to Eastport. Maybe she can keep an eye out in the local thrifts.

I've got a Vincent Price cookbook (which is very good) but it doesn't have your recipes.

Gonna mull on who might have a traditional golumpki recipe. bobsal would be my first suggestion - he's an amazing cook and I think shares an ethnic background with you.
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 08:20 pm
Here are some likely candidates for the cabbage rolls

http://www.marthastewart.com/975559/golumpki#975559


http://easteuropeanfood.about.com/od/maincourses/r/StuffedCabbage.htm

This one is probably closest to what you're looking for

http://www.myrecipes.com/m/recipe/polish-cabbage-rolls
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 08:26 pm
@farmerman,
this recipe includes apples (an interesting twist on the sweet/sour meat/fruit mix that I'm a fan of)

http://cabmgmnt.hubpages.com/hub/Golumpki-Golabki-or-Gwumpki-A-Delicious-Recipe-for-Cabbage-Rolls
knaivete
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 09:40 pm
@farmerman,
Sound familiar?

Quote:
Cabbage rolls, (golumpki, pronounced Go-WUMP'-KEE) is made by making a pork and veal hamburger mixture seasoned with chopped onion, bay leaf, S&P, a wee bit of a paprika and cinnamon mix (very teeny amount cause cinnamon can go far). The meat mixture is browned and the fat removed. This is then mixed with a sticky rice in about equal parts, seasonings are adjusted here . The meat mixture is rolled into the cabbage leaves and held togethre with toothpicks. The mix is cooked in a sweet tomato sauce in a slow cooker or in an oven till cooked through and through). The dish is a single plate supper and is good with crusty bread and sliced boiled new potatoes with sour cream or butter.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 10:04 pm
http://www.plattertalk.com/golumpki-goabki-stuffed-cabbage/
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 10:36 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

The L with an "oin" (a little cross line through the L like an arrow , makes the L sound like a W). So the word can be HAWOOPKI or GOWUMPKI
Everybody knows that.




Actually, I was thinking about how my birth name is spelled in the way that less literate Poles would do it. There's actually an "m" in the middle that isn't present in the version that educated people would have used. The "m" sound is still there, but the unschooled needed it to be literally spelled out for them.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 11:35 pm
The Polish nurses told me that gołąbki actually is nearly the same as our German Kohlroulade (cabbage roll)-

I looked it up at wikipedia: every country seems to make them in a slightly or totally different way.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 21 Oct, 2014 11:57 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
... and that gave me the idea, to cook it today.

(The way I do it is nearly exactly like described >here<, with Savoy cabbage and caraway, and a bacon-ham sauce with reduced cream.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 03:17 am
@ehBeth,
I need to find Msolga but she doesn't do A2K anymore and I don't do FB

There was a guy on Abuzz who lived near BLUE HILL, which is about 100 miles fom Eastport. I ddnt know there was nyone else.

farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 03:23 am
@Lordyaswas,
Its not my focus , Ive given up any hope.
Stealing a Rotweiler is like stealing a Tasmanian Devil.
I once had a Rotty for about 2 weeks when one howed up on our property and we kept it till the owner came and claimed it. It was a particular doofus of a dog I must say. It had particular affinity for mud.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 03:29 am
@Butrflynet,
excellent, you have, once again, come through. There are some other ingredients on the tomato gravy my mom used. It hd the soup, chunky tomato sauce and something a bit sweet too.
. I forgot that MArtha Stewart was the one with Polish recipes
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 03:33 am
@ehBeth,
THE BEER--of course!!.
You and Butterfly will share the much desired red dot.

Its the sauce that sets em apart (and I don't think Ill be using turkey sausage for ANYTHING)
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 03:36 am
@knaivete,
yep, it does sound familiar, cept for the potatoes. ANYTIME busha mde pottoes, they were ALWAYS boiled, buttered and served with sour cream.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
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Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 04:39 am
@Ragman,
I had to quit responding because I was accused of "Flooding" the thread. No bacon in this recipe. BAcon is usually good but I don't think itd add anything except unneeded complexity.
My opinion only
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 04:44 am
@chai2,
heres the Polish alphabet (Anglicized without the diacrytics)
     https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQMkgf-DS0b8Br2Lt0lJk3fo16OPxhgFM5EUm9yulbdcQaTyzGd                                    Only 1 M
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Oct, 2014 04:45 am
@farmerman,
I was totally with you up until that point, fm.

Now I see that you have a baconist agenda, I shall attempt to get my bacon fix elsewhere.
0 Replies
 
 

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