5
   

what is the word/phrase for a person who complains a lot?

 
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Feb, 2008 11:50 am
Cruel children, crying babies
All grow up as geese and gabies,
Hated as their age increases
By their nephews and their nieces.

Robert L. Stevenson
0 Replies
 
Clary
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2008 03:37 am
But he also said
Children, you are very little
And your bones are very brittle

or something very similar - which isn't true
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2008 05:55 am
Clary wrote:
But he also said
Children, you are very little
And your bones are very brittle

or something very similar - which isn't true


may have been true in his day!? Confused
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Feb, 2008 02:49 pm
Aside from rickets--and I believe RLS's "sickly" condition may have included rickets--children are capable of foolhardy feats of derring do that fracture even the firmest bones.

Quote:
Children, you are very little,
And your bones are very brittle;
If you would grow great and stately,
You must try to walk sedately.

You must still be bright and quiet,
And content with simple diet;
And remain, through all bewild'ring,
Innocent and honest children.

Happy hearts and happy faces,
Happy play in grassy places--
That was how in ancient ages,
Children grew to kings and sages.

But the unkind and the unruly,
And the sort who eat unduly,
They must never hope for glory--
Theirs is quite a different story!

Cruel children, crying babies,
All grow up as geese and gabies,
Hated, as their age increases,
By their nephews and their nieces


RLS was of the "seen but not heard" school of child-raising. He was a man of his times.
0 Replies
 
Quincy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Feb, 2008 07:47 am
whinge (winj, hwinj) - intr.v whinged, whinging, whines Informal To whine or complain.
~n. Informal A whine; a complaint [Northern English dialect, from Late Old English hwinsian (imitative); akin to German winseln, to WHINE]
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Feb, 2008 04:36 am
moaning git.
0 Replies
 
MissKirk
 
  1  
Reply Thu 9 Feb, 2012 10:35 pm
A POM actually stands for {prisoner of Mother England} so one would assume that Australians are really the poms and not the english that come over. We weren't the convicts sent over on a boat as a PRISONER were we LOL

And to add to the alot a lot conversation I say alot as nowadays people say and use it as or word.

I love how this post is about whinging people and this forum is bursting with them hehe.
0 Replies
 
margo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 11 Feb, 2012 01:06 am
G'day MissKirk and welcome to A2K.

Fun to read back on this old thread.

I miss Clary!
0 Replies
 
knightlycan
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 24 Mar, 2012 06:55 pm
Bleeding vagina
0 Replies
 
PattiAndrews
 
  1  
Reply Sun 8 Sep, 2013 07:49 pm
@miazhou,
cur·mudg·eon
/kərˈməjən/
noun
noun: curmudgeon; plural noun: curmudgeons
1. a bad-tempered or surly person
0 Replies
 
CORNWALL96
 
  0  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:18 pm
@miazhou,
answer is "malcontent"
CORNWALL96
 
  0  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:19 pm
@Tigershark,
malcontent
0 Replies
 
timur
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 01:25 pm
@CORNWALL96,
No, it's not.

I'm malcontent but I'm not complaining.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 26 Jul, 2014 02:23 pm
Bellyache or bellyacher or the less delicate 'piss and moan'.
0 Replies
 
DrewCC
 
  0  
Reply Sun 30 Oct, 2016 07:16 pm
@miazhou,
Querulous
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  3  
Reply Sun 30 Oct, 2016 09:52 pm
On A2K we call him McGentrix.
0 Replies
 
 

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