1
   

Is a step the same as a pace?

 
 
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 11:12 am
While trying to set pedometer I began to wonder: is a step completed when you have moved one foot forward or when, after moving one foot forward, you bring to other foot up alongside it?

Is a step the same as a pace?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 7,027 • Replies: 18
No top replies

 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 11:40 am
I'd say what you've got there is a distinction without a difference.
0 Replies
 
Chai
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 11:46 am
I thought 1 pace equaled 2 steps.

for instance, 1000 steps would not equal a mile, but 1000 paces would.

left right one pace.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 11:54 am
I always thought that a step was a distance measurement, while pace was a speed measurement (distance/time). ie. what's your pace = how fast do you run ?

Some pedometers require you to measure your stride/step in order to calculate your pace. Others (better ones) do the work for you.


back to say ...


Quote:


WHAT IS THE SIMPLEST WAY TO DETERMINE HOW FAST I'M WALKING?

The easiest way to gauge your speed without wearing a pedometer - or getting in your car and measuring mileage, which can be pretty difficult unless you walk along a street - is to count your number of steps per minute. The experts use this number to calculate pace, based on an average stride length of 2.5 feet. (Stride length is the distance from the heel of one foot to the heel of the other foot when you're taking a step.) They've already done the math for you:



70 steps per minute equals 30 minutes per mile, or 2 miles per hour

105 steps per minute equals 20 minutes per mile, or 3 miles per hour

140 steps per minute equals 15 minutes per mile, or 4 miles per hour



If you pay attention to your steps, after a while you'll be able to estimate your pace fairly accurately without bothering to count. You'll just know what a 20 minute mile or a 15 minute mile feels like.



http://www.stepsout.com/osoyoos/page.asp?p=44
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 12:04 pm
Pace has two real world meanings. Its a relative speed measuremt,
"We began our journey at a pace of four miles per hour"

Its also a mapping tool where we have students walk over a line of approximately 100 ft and everytime , say, their left foot strikes the ground, that is a full step. Starting off with the right foot, then the follwo on step is the left ,that counrts as 1. How many full steps in 100 ft is applied and an unknown distance can be measured in straight line increments. This is handy when mapping an outcropping along a stream because usually, in forest covers , a GPS doesnt work well at all.
0 Replies
 
Tomkitten
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 12:12 pm
Is a step the same as a pace?
Quote:
I'd say what you've got there is a distinction without a difference.


Okay, Set, according to you a step and a pace are the same. But that doesn't answer the first question of a step/pace being movement of one foot or both.

ehBeth - Think of the military order: "Take one pace forward". This implies "pace" as a measurement of distance, not speed. And when you bring in "stride" that quote you give seems to add "stride' to "step" and "pace" as a synonynm.

The verb "to stride" implies long steps taken quickly and energetically, while the verb "to step" implies shorter movements; "to pace" seems to imply something between "stride" and "step", but as with the various nouns, none is clear about total foot movement. ehBeth's citation is the lcearest, though I'm still a little confused.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 12:15 pm
I was going to mention 'pacing' while mapping, but Farmerman beat me to it.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 01:19 pm
Yes, in mapping we used to say that we'd "pace" something out (I haven't thought about that in probably 20 years). That involved Farmerman's explanation of the left foot to left foot measurement.

In that case (distance measurement), a step is not the same as a pace, as a step would be one-half of the pace.

~~~

In the case of speed measurement, a step is a component of the calculation of the pace.

~~~

In neither case is a step an equivalent to a pace. There may be situations where they could have more similar meanings.

~~~

In the context of the pedometer that started tomkitten's musings - pace is speed (or lack thereof). In the same context the stride is the length of an individual step.
0 Replies
 
SULLYFISH66
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 01:50 pm
That pedometer will make a "click" every time the body tells it to. That's how it keeps track of the pace.

My pedometer clicked at each leg's movement.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 03:29 pm
I am unaware of any military command which is rendered "Take one pace forward." I have executed the military command "One step forward, march."

As for the military, in the days of muskets, a pace was defined as two feet in length, and the range of muskets was given in paces. One hundred paces was considered the effective range of muskets. When a line of infantry were advancing to a bayonet attack, they were typically commanded to stop to fire their muskets at 30 paces (about 60 feet), before continuing at the double-quick with bayonets lowered.

I think the entire concept of attempting to make a valid distinction between a step and a pace in this conext is silly.
0 Replies
 
Tomkitten
 
  1  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2007 04:25 pm
Is a step the same as a pace?
Set - I may be wrong; I've only seen the phrase in novels; I've never been in the military.

I am now hopelessly confused.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 08:11 am
Going by the overtones and connotations of the words, I'd say a "pace" was a step of a standard (by the individual) length and a "step" was more variable.

You could pace out a walking course--or a target range--with steps of the same length.

On the other hand, going cross country, some terrain will accommodate pacing but sandy ground or boggy ground or eroding scree will require careful navigation and steps that are shorter than your standard pace.

I'd measure a comfortable pace, stepping across your living room floor, and set the pedometer accordingly.
0 Replies
 
Tomkitten
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 08:56 am
Is a step the same as a pace?
I still don't know whether a step is one foot forward or both feet forward. If both feet, does the second foot stop in exact alignment with the first foot, or beyond it, i.e. toe next to toe, or toe passing so that heel is next to toe?

I really don't know why I'm breaking my brain over this, since I no longer have a pedometer; it's just a question that occurred to me at 2 in the morning.


What a way to start the New Year!
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 09:03 am
SULLYFISH66 wrote:
That pedometer will make a "click" every time the body tells it to. That's how it keeps track of the pace.

My pedometer clicked at each leg's movement.


Some pedometers click with each hip's movement. Those pedometers are measuring steps.

Others (usually the less expensive, or free ones) only click with movement of one hip - they are, in effect, measuring paces (two steps).

Other pedometers require you to measure the length of one of your steps (your stride) - enter it into the pedometer - and the pedometer than measures your distance walked.

There is also an Ipod/Nike pedometer that not only tells you number of steps and distance travelled, but will calculate your speed over various splits.

~~~

The directions with a particular pedometer usually tell you what it will be measuring for you.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 10:04 am
TomKitten--

Obviously you're planning several journeys in 2008--or perhaps many long, productive walks.

Hold your dominion.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 01:03 pm
Hmmm. We paced on jobs for a quick and dirty estimate while talking over design possibilities; detailed measurements followed, unless the place was a large property surveyed by a pro surveying firm. Our paces varied, but were basically long steps, as one would do in a stride. My 'pace' is 2.5 feet, my business partner's 3.0 feet - she's taller. This is also how the larger firm I worked with for years "paced". That is, basically counting the feet that land, no matter which foot.
0 Replies
 
Tomkitten
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 01:51 pm
Is a step the same as a pace?
I read just yesterday that to keep fit one should walk 10,000 steps a day. I have no idea what that distance would be, so I just got further confused. Someday I'll count the steps, just for curiosity; I am not going out and buy a pedometer, though.

Actually, our building is flat and fairly low, with an extensive footprint,. My apartment is about 2 city blocks from the trash room, and three from my garage parking space. So I get plenty of walking just going down to the exercise room which is approximately the same distance as my car. The result is that between the treadmill and the long distance to and from the exercise room, I do about a mile, right there.

The apartment is long and there is plenty of opportunity to walk a good distance right here, without opening my front door, but the public corridors and the exercise room provide variety. Inside, I try to arrange things so that if I have two items to carry from one room to another, I make two trips, three items = three trips, and so on.

Would you call this productive walking or just virtuous?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 01:55 pm
Sounds productive to me...
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2008 01:59 pm
I posted on the weight loss thread about my efforts to continue to follow the 10,000 step program. I got a free pedometer when we were in New York (part of a promo by Alli), and was amazed to discover how many steps I take on a regular basis.

Now it's more about increasing my pace/speed than increasing the distance. Once my regular pace/speed is faster, I'll increase the distance (# of steps) again.
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Is a step the same as a pace?
Copyright © 2022 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.07 seconds on 01/22/2022 at 05:17:12