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The 82nd Rainforest Thread ~

 
 
ul
 
  3  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 03:03 pm
Washer kaputt- not nice. Hope you can have it fixed.

Back to workalready, although the kids will arrive on Monday.
Nice to have memories and ideas from my summer and looking forward to the kids and their new ideas.
Now waiting how things will develop in Denver.
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 05:08 pm
@ul,
No responses yet from repair people. The new Best Buy should have a few clothes washers on sale. Probably be cheaper than buying a new clutch for the old appliance.

Listened to Hillary's speech on NPR {tv on the blink also} so i'm hearing Denver-not seeing much of it. Will be interesting hearing issues from the Dems.

Beginning the new school year is an exciting time for the kids. You'll hear wonderful vacation stories, certainly. Smile

At the store, a mom was looking for a particular flavor soup she wanted - her mom and i searching the deli brands. The little girl kept repeating something we couldn't quite hear - so i asked her. She looked at her mom and me and said "the color isn't there". to cute



Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 05:33 pm
@danon5,
Dan, {if the image stays on the page....} The Mohawk OV 1.

http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:qZtIf7jtDVkJ::www.richard-seaman.com/Aircraft/AirShows/Oshkosh2002/Samplers/PostWw2/Mohawk.jpg

Dans first solo flight. Very Happy
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/68/162853331_5a46a3df20.jpg?v=0

Yep, there is always the chance that luck steps in - however, a certain amount of skill is pretty important also. Godspeed



0 Replies
 
sumac
 
  3  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 06:08 pm
@Stradee,
Watching the convention and waiting for tonight's later events. Have to drink coffee to stay awake, and then I am up and down throughout the night with trips to the bathroom to pee.

Clicked.

[img]http://media3.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/photo/2008/08/26/PH2008082603271.jpg/img]

Scientists Report Further Shrinking of Arctic Ice
Area Is Close To All-Time Low

By Juliet Eilperin
Washington Post Staff Writer
Wednesday, August 27, 2008; A03

Arctic sea ice has shrunk to the second-lowest level since record-keeping began three decades ago, a group of international researchers determined yesterday, a revelation underscoring how rapidly climate change is transforming ecosystems in northern latitudes.

The extent of Arctic sea ice is now 2 million square miles below the long-term average for Aug. 26, according to the International Arctic Research Center and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency, a figure that is within 400,000 square miles of the all-time record low set in September 2007. This figure is already below the long-term average for September ice cover and because the ice traditionally reaches its minimum level in mid-September, researchers warned that a new low might be recorded within weeks.

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), which independently analyzes Arctic ice cover, will announce today that it has reached the same conclusion, based on a five-day mean of satellite measurements.

"If we continue to lose ice at this rate, we will best" the 2007 record, said Julienne Stroeve, an research scientist. "We're going to lose that ice, so we've got to understand what this means for the rest of us."

According to the data center's recent reports, the ice over the Chukchi Sea is "already showing patches of open water within the ice. Much of the Beaufort Sea north of Alaska is open and the Laptev Sea and East Siberian Sea have opened extensively in the past 13 days."

The shrinking sea ice is increasing the pressure on polar bears in the region: A recent federal aerial survey found nine polar bears swimming in Alaska's Chukchi Sea, with one at least 60 miles from shore.

Margaret Williams, who directs the World Wildlife Fund's Alaska office and traveled to Barrow, Alaska, last week to assess how sea ice decline is affecting polar bears, said that while these animals have swum in open ocean in the past, they are now traveling much longer distances.

"It is very unusual to see so many bears in the open water at one time during a short flight period," Williams said, noting that government scientists spotted the bears over a six-hour period. "It's very worrisome. It's what we had anticipated, but it's happening right before our eyes."

By comparison, federal scientists spotted a total of 12 polar bears swimming in the open ocean between 1987 and 2003. The federal government conducts the aerial surveys not to assess the status of polar bears in the region, but to determine whether bowhead whales in the Arctic will be affected by offshore oil development there.

Even if researchers spot polar bears swimming in distress, they cannot rescue them, as attempts to tranquilize the bears would cause them to drown. In May, Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne listed polar bears as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, saying diminishing sea ice jeopardized their ability to survive in the foreseeable future, but he argued such a listing should not prompt the government to regulate greenhouse gases linked to global warming.

"We never get good news about the polar bears," said Melanie Duchin, a global warming campaigner for the advocacy group Greenpeace. "It's just yet another wake-up call in a long line of wake-up calls to politicians in this country that says, 'Hey, get your act together when it comes to global warming.' "

Researchers now estimate that summer sea ice in the Arctic is likely to disappear altogether by 2030, but Stroeve said the new satellite data suggest sea ice could vanish sooner than that.

Two weeks ago, the federal Climate Change Science Program released a "synthesis and assessment" report examining global warming in the Arctic and northern latitudes that suggests the region has already suffered ice loss of an "immense magnitude and unprecedented nature."

The report, which is open for public comment until Sept. 25, adds that the "current sea ice reduction . . . is progressing at a very fast rate that appears to have no analogs in the past" and that "sustained changes in sea-ice coverage may cause perhaps the largest temperature changes observed on the planet."

Stroeve said researchers anticipated this year's ice decline could rival last year's because so much of the Arctic's ice cover is one-year ice, which is thinner than ice that has built up over multiple years. This year, 73 percent of the Arctic Basin is composed of first-year ice, compared with 60 percent last year. In 1985, first-year ice made up 35 percent of the Arctic Basin.

"We knew we were vulnerable starting out, in terms of ice cover," she said.

Nick Sundt, the World Wildlife Fund's communications director for climate change, said the significance of this week's findings is not that a specific record is being set but that Artic sea ice cover is consistently declining.

"It's not what happens in an individual year, but what the trend is," Sundt said.
Stradee
 
  3  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 07:32 pm
http://dingo.care2.com/pictures/c2c/share/86/860/024/860240_370.jpg

Disappointing and sad news from Alaska. Unfortunately, Alaska voters defeated a ballot initiative yesterday that would have ended the state’s brutal aerial hunting program.

Not done yet though! The PAWS Act will halt the killing of wolves - the Bill has strong bipartisan support in the House of Representatives. Next step, the Senate.








ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 08:44 pm
@Stradee,
You and your 300 friends have supported 2,912,536.9 square feet!

http://www.utoledo.edu/library/carlson/exhibits/gypsy/images/Happy_Campers1.jpg
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 09:32 pm
@sumac,
The next election is taking its toll on we older folk.

Maybe i won't buy a tv after all.

Disturbing article, sue and nothing we can do to save the bears unless we have leadership that cares more for the enviornment and less about the status quo.

Kempthorn's contradictions for his 'findings' amaze me. He admints global warming is the cause of ice melting, but doesn't add that gross pollutants are the number one cause of shifting weather patterns.

Politcal puppetry





0 Replies
 
danon5
 
  5  
Reply Wed 27 Aug, 2008 10:10 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth, 66.83 acres saved to date. That's great.

Yeah, Wildclickers!!!!

Stradee, thank you for the pic of the plane I flew.

Ul, you like stories?? One day - in Vietnam - I was returning to my home base. It was monsoon weather and as I was heading for the home landing site - I saw huge and very high clouds in my way. I said to myself, "I'm going OVER those clouds and land at my home base. Well, I actually climbed to 42,000 feet and the clouds were still above me. The reason I did this was I was crazy at the time and didn't want to call the local Air Force base and request instrument landing. At that altitude, all I had was oxygen and no presurised aircraft. So, as the airplane would not climb any further up - I pulled back the power levers and after turning the nose straight down, I popped my speed breaks and about fifteen minutes later I was doging waves on the South China Sea under the clouds to get back to base. It took about twentey minutes and LOOW - there I was - and did not have to call the other Air Force Base for landing instructions.

There was another time I did call the Air Force Base. I had been shot and had no hydrolics. The plane I flew was totally hydrolloically flown. Lose that and you lose control. It was not a good time. I managed to call my company base and tell them what was going on - then, I called the Air Force Base and requested a PRECAUTIONARY landing - after telling them what my problem was. They had the runway safety team. As I approached the airfield, and I felt that I had the landing in hand if my engines failed - I pulled the emergency landing gear blow down handle. Nothing happened. I pulled it more and still nothing happened. I pulled it again and the entire handle came out - about twelve inches - all I saw was a cable attached to the handle. As I approached landing - I pulled the cable with both hands and the thing blew - except for the front landing gear. The panel indicators told me the two mains were down but the nose landing gear was not down. I said, "Well, here we go." But, at landing all the landing gear held together and all was well. Except for the bullet holes.......Big Grin
sumac
 
  3  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2008 03:33 am
@danon5,
August 26, 2008
Friend or Foe? Crows Never Forget a Face, It Seems
By MICHELLE NIJHUIS

Crows and their relatives " among them ravens, magpies and jays " are renowned for their intelligence and for their ability to flourish in human-dominated landscapes. That ability may have to do with cross-species social skills. In the Seattle area, where rapid suburban growth has attracted a thriving crow population, researchers have found that the birds can recognize individual human faces.

John M. Marzluff, a wildlife biologist at the University of Washington, has studied crows and ravens for more than 20 years and has long wondered if the birds could identify individual researchers. Previously trapped birds seemed more wary of particular scientists, and often were harder to catch. “I thought, ‘Well, it’s an annoyance, but it’s not really hampering our work,’ ” Dr. Marzluff said. “But then I thought we should test it directly.”

To test the birds’ recognition of faces separately from that of clothing, gait and other individual human characteristics, Dr. Marzluff and two students wore rubber masks. He designated a caveman mask as “dangerous” and, in a deliberate gesture of civic generosity, a Dick Cheney mask as “neutral.” Researchers in the dangerous mask then trapped and banded seven crows on the university’s campus in Seattle.

In the months that followed, the researchers and volunteers donned the masks on campus, this time walking prescribed routes and not bothering crows.

The crows had not forgotten. They scolded people in the dangerous mask significantly more than they did before they were trapped, even when the mask was disguised with a hat or worn upside down. The neutral mask provoked little reaction. The effect has not only persisted, but also multiplied over the past two years. Wearing the dangerous mask on one recent walk through campus, Dr. Marzluff said, he was scolded by 47 of the 53 crows he encountered, many more than had experienced or witnessed the initial trapping. The researchers hypothesize that crows learn to recognize threatening humans from both parents and others in their flock.

After their experiments on campus, Dr. Marzluff and his students tested the effect with more realistic masks. Using a half-dozen students as models, they enlisted a professional mask maker, then wore the new masks while trapping crows at several sites in and around Seattle. The researchers then gave a mix of neutral and dangerous masks to volunteer observers who, unaware of the masks’ histories, wore them at the trapping sites and recorded the crows’ responses.

The reaction to one of the dangerous masks was “quite spectacular,” said one volunteer, Bill Pochmerski, a retired telephone company manager who lives near Snohomish, Wash. “The birds were really raucous, screaming persistently,” he said, “and it was clear they weren’t upset about something in general. They were upset with me.”

Again, crows were significantly more likely to scold observers who wore a dangerous mask, and when confronted simultaneously by observers in dangerous and neutral masks, the birds almost unerringly chose to persecute the dangerous face. In downtown Seattle, where most passersby ignore crows, angry birds nearly touched their human foes. In rural areas, where crows are more likely to be viewed as noisy “flying rats” and shot, the birds expressed their displeasure from a distance.

Though Dr. Marzluff’s is the first formal study of human face recognition in wild birds, his preliminary findings confirm the suspicions of many other researchers who have observed similar abilities in crows, ravens, gulls and other species. The pioneering animal behaviorist Konrad Lorenz was so convinced of the perceptive capacities of crows and their relatives that he wore a devil costume when handling jackdaws. Stacia Backensto, a master’s student at the University of Alaska Fairbanks who studies ravens in the oil fields on Alaska’s North Slope, has assembled an elaborate costume " including a fake beard and a potbelly made of pillows " because she believes her face and body are familiar to previously captured birds.

Kevin J. McGowan, an ornithologist at the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology who has trapped and banded crows in upstate New York for 20 years, said he was regularly followed by birds who have benefited from his handouts of peanuts " and harassed by others he has trapped in the past.

Why crows and similar species are so closely attuned to humans is a matter of debate. Bernd Heinrich, a professor emeritus at the University of Vermont known for his books on raven behavior, suggested that crows’ apparent ability to distinguish among human faces is a “byproduct of their acuity,” an outgrowth of their unusually keen ability to recognize one another, even after many months of separation.

Dr. McGowan and Dr. Marzluff believe that this ability gives crows and their brethren an evolutionary edge. “If you can learn who to avoid and who to seek out, that’s a lot easier than continually getting hurt,” Dr. Marzluff said. “I think it allows these animals to survive with us " and take advantage of us " in a much safer, more effective way.”
0 Replies
 
alex240101
 
  3  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2008 08:15 am
Joy.
The turtles have begun hatching. Under two inches in diameter. You can hear their little hisses.
Clicked.
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2008 02:43 pm
Have a wonderful day, Teeny!

http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/FIP/HB-00004-C~Happy-Birthday-Roses-Posters.jpg
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2008 03:00 pm
sue, I'll remember the article next Jay feeding. The first squak outta them...no food.

Alex, a new herd of babies!

Dan, wasn't the linked photo of the first solo plane you piloted?
{Very good stories}

Have a marvelous day Wildclickers!


http://rainforest.care2.com/i?p=583091674

0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  3  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2008 07:54 pm
@danon5,
Always interesting to catch up here. Personal stories, news, pet updates, photos.

Just saying - you all are interesting people.

~~~

You and your 300 friends have supported 2,912,603.6 square feet!

Marine Wetlands habitat supported: 215,535.2 square feet.

American Prairie habitat supported: 67,884.1 square feet.

Rainforest habitat supported: 2,629,184.2 square feet.

~~~

(thanks for the calculation, danon)

http://dingo.care-mail.com/cards/new/0375/hello.gif
danon5
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2008 10:40 pm
@ehBeth,
yes, ehBeth, todays is 66.864 acres..... That's great clicking!!

Stradee, that looks like a Taylor Craft - but, the one I flew wasn't painted like that one.

Happy Birthday, teeny !!!!
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Aug, 2008 11:20 pm
tomorrow the creek

http://hoover.archives.gov/LIW/pioneering/images/washwomantn.jpg

http://www.angelfire.com/tn2/ScottCoTnMemories/WashBoardPhoto.jpg
ul
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 10:14 am
http://img505.imageshack.us/img505/9758/roteblte1cq4.jpg

Teeny,
Happy belated Birthday!
0 Replies
 
ul
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 10:21 am
@danon5,
Dan,
thank you for the stories.

. Except for the bullet holes.......Big Grin

I am glad you could grin then and grin and smile now!
Please say hello to Patti. Tell her I thought of her when we found some real nice crystals- amethyst and rose. And some fool's gold.
0 Replies
 
ul
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 10:47 am
@Stradee,
soak
http://img383.imageshack.us/img383/6537/dsc00497tb8.jpg

wash
http://img184.imageshack.us/img184/7371/img2523im3.jpg

rinse
http://img517.imageshack.us/img517/2830/dsc00358dg7.jpg
Wink
Hope your washer is ready soon-
Stradee
 
  2  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 11:47 am
@ul,
Very Happy

Me too! Yesterday, price comparisons. Today, telephone shopping. Tomorrow, linens.
0 Replies
 
Stradee
 
  3  
Reply Fri 29 Aug, 2008 12:43 pm
Arctic sea ice drops to 2nd lowest recorded level
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26426382/

Alaska voters defeat tougher mining rules
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26445447/

McCain picks Sarah Palin for VP
AP - The little known Alaska governor is "exactly who I need" for a running mate, the Republican candidate tells supporters.
McCain picks Sarah Palin for VP
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/cvn_veepstakes_palin






http://rainforest.care2.com/i?p=583091674
 

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