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Doctors will no longer wear white coats?

 
 
Miller
 
Reply Mon 17 Sep, 2007 06:41 pm
White coats forbidden

THE END OF AN ERA

The BBC has just reported that in the name of infection control, the government have suggested? indicated? dictated? that doctors will no longer wear white coats.

Imagine that!

Apparently it is because long sleeves do not enable proper hand washing.

Presumably it is not possible to make white coats with short or 3/4 length sleeves.

Is this clutching at Infection Control straws in the face of high bed occupancy, high movement of patients and staff, inadequate environmental cleanliness and maintenance, and lack of engagement of staff in hand hygeine?

An excuse?

In any case, doctors don't wear white coats much nowadays because of lack of hospital laundering facilities.

No. The Witch Doctor thinks if this is the case, it is the beginning of a communal "uniform."

Like the communal escalator in "The Secret NHS."

The levelling, the blurring of roles in a competency based NHS.

A government killing two birds with one stone.

Go and hunt out the original DOH document about forbidding white coats, will you, My Black Cat?

witchdoctor.wordpress.com
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 852 • Replies: 14
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Sep, 2007 06:49 pm
Oh, I read that earlier and took it that they'd give the coats short sleeves...
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Sep, 2007 06:51 pm
Yeh, here -

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/6998195.stm
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Sep, 2007 07:00 pm
White coats face cull in 'superbug' fight

Monday, 17 Sep 2007 10:12

[Long-sleeved white coats will no longer be allowed on hospital wards]
Long-sleeved white coats will no longer be allowed on hospital wards
Traditional doctors' long-sleeved white coats will no longer be allowed on hospital wards as part of measures to tackle hospital 'superbugs'.

A new 'below the elbow' dress code announced today rules out long shirt sleeves, wrist watches, jewellery and ties.

It is thought that long-sleeved clothing prevents thorough hand and wrist washing, which is vital to reduce rates of the infections MRSA and Clostridium difficile (C-diff).

Latest figures from the Health Protection Agency show that rates of MRSA are falling but cases of C-diff have risen this year.

As well as ensuring short-sleeved clothes, other measures outlined by the health secretary Alan Johnson include making sure matrons play a role in monitoring ward cleanliness.

They will be required along with clinical directors to report quarterly to trust boards on infection control and cleanliness.

Today's guidance also calls for an increased use of isolation for patients infected with MRSA and C-diff in single bedrooms.

Trust chief executives will face a legal requirement to report infection rates and those who do not will face fines.

Commenting on the measures, Mr Johnson said he is "determined" cleanliness should be the "first priority of every NHS organisation".

"Across the NHS we continue to bring the number of MRSA cases down and make progress on measures to reduce C-difficile," he added.

"Today's package of measures will give more responsibility to matrons and set guidelines on clothing that will help ensure thorough hand washing and prevent the spread of infections. This is a clear signal to patients that doctors, nurses, and other clinical staff are taking their safety seriously."

The measures have been welcomed by health organisations; Royal College of Nursing general secretary Dr Peter Carter said the guidance is a "positive step forward".

Dr Vivienne Nathanson, head of science and ethics for the British Medical Association, added: "It is very important to emphasise, however, that clean hands, bare elbows and short-sleeves are only one aspect of preventing and controlling infection.

"A co-ordinated approach addressing all the relevant factors, for example dress code, bed occupancy, hygiene in hospital and isolation policies, is most likely to be successful."
End of story

www.InTheNews.co.uk
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Sep, 2007 07:02 pm
No ties! How about beards?? Laughing
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Sep, 2007 07:25 pm
Probably two foot long beards would be a bad idea...
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Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Sep, 2007 06:57 pm
I'm concerned about clandestine nose picking. Could that be delegated to a nurse? "Nurse, pick my nose!"
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Sep, 2007 07:08 pm
pass the gauze..
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Sep, 2007 07:13 pm
Well, not to make light of all this, the infection rates are, to me, astronomic.


I was a person with a lab coat for fifteen years, but usually not in main hospital corridors, more research and clinical labs. S/t, I carried a guinea pig in the pocket for a bit, in the early years. Not a good idea, don't do that. The g/p liked it well enough, but it ain't "pro".
0 Replies
 
Mr Nice
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Sep, 2007 10:00 pm
Short-sleeved white coats instead of the long ones? : Agree.

Seven foot long beards instead of two foot ones? : Agree.

Delegating nose picking to a machine instead of a nurse? : Agree.

Ties forbidden? : Agree.

Clean-shaven moustaches? : Agree.
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Sat 22 Sep, 2007 10:07 pm
Working in a veterinary surgery, I can't overemphasize how much the use of hospital scrubs improves hygiene. If the scrubs touch anything questionable, they get changed. It's cheap, it's simple, and it works. As far as I'm concerned, that's professional attire.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Sep, 2007 10:09 am
Another source of contamination of the work environment has to be the shoes.

Only a select few of hospital employees wear shoe covers.
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Sep, 2007 04:06 pm
Miller wrote:
Another source of contamination of the work environment has to be the shoes.

Only a select few of hospital employees wear shoe covers.


Based on the number of people that come to hospitals with compromised immune systems, I don't see how some hospitals could not be big petri dishes? Perhaps, light, equal to sunlight, could be used to kill much of the organisms. It would cost though.
0 Replies
 
squinney
 
  1  
Reply Sun 23 Sep, 2007 04:32 pm
I've often wondered about lab coats, scrubs, shoes, etc.

I worked in a hospital (ICU's) at end of college years and wore scrubs. I had to change into them at beginning of shift, but could wear them home to wash. That was only for Burn Unit. Other units I had scrubs I wore in, did my shift, wore home.

You see doctors, resp. therapists, lab workers, etc. wearing their coats all day, patient to patient, down to the cafeteria, out to smoke, home and back the next day... That's a lot of germs being carried around.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Mon 24 Sep, 2007 07:44 am
squinney wrote:
I've often wondered about lab coats, scrubs, shoes, etc.

I worked in a hospital (ICU's) at end of college years and wore scrubs. I had to change into them at beginning of shift, but could wear them home to wash. That was only for Burn Unit. Other units I had scrubs I wore in, did my shift, wore home.

You see doctors, resp. therapists, lab workers, etc. wearing their coats all day, patient to patient, down to the cafeteria, out to smoke, home and back the next day... That's a lot of germs being carried around.


You see them on the subway, buses and trains too.
0 Replies
 
 

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