1
   

Halloween or Hallowe'en?

 
 
Equus
 
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 08:58 am
Which is the more proper spelling:
Halloween or Hallowe'en?

I've always spelled it without the apostrophe, but several erudite friends insist on the apostrophe.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 1,222 • Replies: 7
No top replies

 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 09:10 am
My parents--particularly my mother--kept a close and critical eye on the public school cirriculum.

The second grade speller (probably printed in the early-to-mid '30's) mandated "Hallowe'en. I can remember both parents grumbling that the apostrophe was a foolish affectation in an increasingly secular world. We were allowed to omit the apostrophe every place but spelling tests.
0 Replies
 
littlek
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 10:56 am
And, actually, I think in the classroom, it might be good for students to see that. Someone would be bound to ask (or be lead to ask) what the apostrophe is for and then the teacher would have a teachable moment on his or her hands.

But, I don't know which is proper. I think either is equally ok.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 10:59 am
I've always used Hallowe'en.

It doesn't look quite right to me without the apostrophe.
0 Replies
 
Noddy24
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 11:09 am
The old-fashioned apostrophe ties the date to the church calendar.
0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 12:09 pm
I think either would do nowadays.

And newcomers might pronounce Hallowe'en as Hallow Enn

Shocked
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 01:31 pm
According to my handy-dandy Webster's, both are correct, but Halloween is the preferred spelling these days (in the US).
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 15 Sep, 2007 03:47 pm
Forty years ago, thankfully nobody in the UK had heard much of this "ghastly American nonsense". Now it has become a commercial institution here usually spelled without the apostrophe. I wonder how many kids here or in the USA actually know of its Christian and pagan origins as "All Hallows' Eve" and "Samhain".
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

deal - Question by WBYeats
Drs. = female doctor? - Question by oristarA
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Please, I need help. - Question by imsak
Is this sentence grammatically correct? - Question by Sydney-Strock
"come from" - Question by mcook
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Halloween or Hallowe'en?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 12/06/2021 at 05:32:58