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HOW HEALTHY IS IT TO WORK ?

 
 
Reply Sun 2 Sep, 2007 07:37 pm
my life-long studies are finally being acknowledged :
SLEEP MAY BE BETTER THAN WORK Shocked Laughing !
I DRINK TO THAT !
hbg

Quote:
Work 'the biggest sleep robber'
Work time is the single most important lifestyle factor that impacts on sleep - the more hours you work the less sleep you get - research suggests.
Those who got less than four-and-a-half hours sleep a night worked an average of 93 minutes longer on weekdays and 118 minutes more at the weekend.

Commuting time ranked second, above socialising and leisure time, for eating into sleep time.

The study in the journal Sleep included nearly 50,000 US participants.


Quote:
People are burning the candle at both ends more and more
Jessica Alexander from The Sleep Council


They were surveyed on three different occasions - in 2003, 2004 and 2005 - and asked how they spent their time between 4am the previous day and 4am that day.

Time spent working had the biggest impact on sleep time.

Those who slept 11-and-a-half hours or more worked an average of 143 minutes less on weekdays and 71 minutes less on weekends than the average sleeper.

Short sleepers also spent more time socialising, studying and doing housework.

In comparison, time spent watching TV increased with longer sleep times.

The age group that slept the least and worked the most was 45- to 54-year-olds, Dr Mathias Basner, of the University of Pennsylvania, and his colleagues found.

24/7 society

Dr Basner said more work was now needed to measure what impact long working hours encroaching on sleep might be having on health.

Jessica Alexander from The Sleep Council said: "Survey after survey confirms that people are burning the candle at both ends more and more, with no let-up on increasingly global working environments that demand long working hours and 24/7 leisure opportunities.

"Modern technology has done nothing to free up our time and sleep length and quality is the victim.

"Eventually business, government and the medical profession will have to give sleep as much priority in their healthy living messages as diet and exercise - if not more.

"In the meantime, The Sleep Council will continue to spread the word and advise people how to improve their sleep quality, if not quantity, through simple lifestyle and environmental changes."

Experts generally agree that seven to nine hours of sleep a night is advisable for adults.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/health/6972409.stm

Published: 2007/09/01 23:14:33 GMT

© BBC MMVII




WORK INTERFERING WITH SLEEP ?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 942 • Replies: 18
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Sep, 2007 08:10 pm
My wife recently told me there are studies that show we do not really need eight hours of sleep. What it found important was simply that the individual felt rested. Being in bed for eight hours - tossing and turning - can be unrested sleep. I personally also think that last 2 or 3 hours is when we're really in deep sleep.

It's healthy to work if you enjoy it; most do not enjoy their jobs, and many are stressed out from their jobs.

Personally speaking, I enjoyed my jobs, but retirement is best!
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2007 06:34 pm
Quote:
but retirement is best!


Shocked Laughing :wink:

it doesn't take long to get used to it - just speaking personally , of course !
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Sep, 2007 06:54 pm
What I learned early before I retired was that many people retire, then really "retire" from life. They die during the first year after retirement or soon there after.

I keep busy. I'm afraid of becoming a couch potato.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 02:36 am
It isn't just about work/sleep ratio, is it? It's balance in our lives that's important. Remember the 40 hour week? <sigh> Remember the ideal of a balance between work, rest, recreation & education? ..... that we all have a right to dignity & fulfilling lives & not just be considered workers on treadmills?
0 Replies
 
helmi15
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 09:12 am
I think a life without a job or any challenge would be quite boring. I would spend more time in bed than awake. That is a horrible imagination to me.

For the last 3 years I have been working in a 4-shift schedule as a lab assistant. Beside work I went to school to get a-levels, because I want study technical chemistry.
I really grew with that task. I stayed up awake so many nights learning, combating sleep with coffee. I always thought t hat sleep just hinders me achieving my goals.

So I was albe to get a-levels in the shortest time possible. Now I have to wait until march, before I am gonna go to university, because then I am gonna get a grant, which I don't get now. It depends on the time I have already worked and earned money.

Just working is soooo boring. There is no real challenge in my current job. I am just looking forwards to spring 08.

I learned that being constantly occupied can be very satisfying. It was like feeling life running through my venes. Really great, but sometimes you should take a break for recreation.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 12:43 pm
Quote:
Remember the 40 hour week?


i was darn lucky with my last job that lasted for about 30 years - before early retirement Shocked Very Happy

we did work 40 hours from september to april , but come may 1 and we had a 37 1/2 hour week !
the senior vice-president (and actuary Laughing ) decided that one could easily do in 37 1/2 hours what usually takes 40 hours - he liked to get away to the golf course during the summer and thought that all employees should benefit from an extra half hour of leisure time during the summer .
i never disagreed with him :wink:
hbg
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 12:49 pm
Actually, during my career, my work week dropped from about 55 to 60 hours per week right out of college (trying to make a name for myself with the company, and it paid off) to about 25 hours per week just before my retirement.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 01:01 pm
c.i. wrote :

Quote:
Actually, during my career, my work week dropped from about 55 to 60 hours per week right out of college (trying to make a name for myself with the company, and it paid off) to about 25 hours per week just before my retirement.


the company probably decided to allow c.i. to go on retirement before he might "infect" others with a certain bug Laughing
if they would have kept him on , he would have asked for overtime pay for leaving early in the afternoon Shocked Laughing
hbg(enjoying retirement - not bored yet after 20 years of it - will notify when becoming bored - got to rush , work to do !!!)
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 01:30 pm
hamburger wrote:
c.i. wrote :

Quote:
Actually, during my career, my work week dropped from about 55 to 60 hours per week right out of college (trying to make a name for myself with the company, and it paid off) to about 25 hours per week just before my retirement.


the company probably decided to allow c.i. to go on retirement before he might "infect" others with a certain bug Laughing
if they would have kept him on , he would have asked for overtime pay for leaving early in the afternoon Shocked Laughing
hbg(enjoying retirement - not bored yet after 20 years of it - will notify when becoming bored - got to rush , work to do !!!)


I actually retired early by US standards at age 63. I resigned my job because I came down with shingles while on sabbatical to the UK, and was off of work for over three months. I just called my boss and told him to replace my position, because I was going to retire. Best damn decision I ever made! LOL
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 01:43 pm
Did the shingles come back?
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 01:46 pm
No, but the potential is always there. I've been lucky, because I had it when a doctor was around, and he gave me pain meds. He and his family from Singapore are now friends of mine, and I have visited them a couple of times.
0 Replies
 
mismi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 02:00 pm
msolga wrote:
It isn't just about work/sleep ratio, is it? It's balance in our lives that's important. Remember the 40 hour week? <sigh> Remember the ideal of a balance between work, rest, recreation & education? ..... that we all have a right to dignity & fulfilling lives & not just be considered workers on treadmills?


absolutely! Moderation is key..and you have to work hard at it in todays society! You don't work long hours you are considered uncommitted and your paycheck will show it. We want to suck the marrow out of life but living it is sucking the marrow out of me! I want to be supportive - but even I as a stay at home Mom am feeling the pressure to start working again so I can afford to put the three boys in college without making them put themselves in hock up to their eyeballs for their education - and to take some of the pressure off of my husband. Oh! I just can't think about it too much! Makes me want to drink! Laughing
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 05:05 pm
mismi, You are one of millions of American famiilies in the same plight; more mothers are going into the work force to help increase the household income. I really feel sorry for the young parents of today trying to make a living and working towards helping their children with the expenses of a college education.

I just wanted to let you know that it's okay to let the children work through college and/or owe money on loans. All my siblings and I did not get any money assistance from our parents, but we all managed to get our college education.

When my younger brother graduated from med school, he owed $8,000. When my nephew and niece graduated from med school, they owed $108,000.

It's also important to save for your own retirement so that you donot become a financial burden to your children.

It's a tough call, but I've always felt that people who work themselves through college has more to offer as an employee.
0 Replies
 
hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Tue 4 Sep, 2007 06:00 pm
the university of waterloo in ontario has a splendid "work-study" program that allows students to attend university for four months and be placed in a paid job appropriate to the studies for four months .
imo an excellent way for students to combine learning with gaining work-experience .
while the total study time is somewhat longer than in a conventional program , students really have a chance to find out early , if the studies they are taking and the work they are doing is something they'll want to make a career of .
and it also allows them to graduate without an undue financial burden .

on top of it , waterloo is one of the top-rated universities in canada and many of the graduates have gone on to become "names" in research and industry (particularly computers and information systems) .
hbg

Quote:
The University of Waterloo operates the largest post secondary school co-op program of its kind in the world with more than 12000 students enrolled
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Sep, 2007 03:42 am
cicerone imposter wrote:
No, but the potential is always there. I've been lucky, because I had it when a doctor was around, and he gave me pain meds. He and his family from Singapore are now friends of mine, and I have visited them a couple of times.


Too much stress can cause the eruptions to occur.
0 Replies
 
helmi15
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Sep, 2007 06:35 pm
It was mentioned before that 63 is an early age for retirement in the usa. Does someone there get any kind of public retirement pay?

Is it true that you absolutely get nothing and you have to take care for it on your own, while you are still employed?
I read that Arnold Schwarzenegger is planning tu built up a public pension sheme, like in many European countries?
But in fact, I think, as people are getting older and older retirement pays won't be financially feasible in the future.
But on the other hand not all people can for instance work until the age of 60.
The body of a building worker is used up after a few decades and he won't be able to continue his profession any longer. What should he do? He is not qualified for another work and additional industry prefers younger people when recruting new staff. A very difficult situation for people about the 50s.

The idea of combining a college study with appropiate work is not new. I know at least in Austria, Germany and Switzerland you can visit a Fachhochschule. This is a kind of technical college.
An average fh study lasts 8 semesters.
You have the possibility to study full time. That means one semester you have to work for a company.
Or you can spend one semester a year studying, the other one you work. So you get paid the whole 4 years. This is a good chance for older people who already have a good job at their company and don't want stop working at all.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Wed 5 Sep, 2007 06:52 pm
Miller wrote:
cicerone imposter wrote:
No, but the potential is always there. I've been lucky, because I had it when a doctor was around, and he gave me pain meds. He and his family from Singapore are now friends of mine, and I have visited them a couple of times.


Too much stress can cause the eruptions to occur.


That's also what I heard, but with no work stress, my lifestyle is pretty much stress-free (no money worries like most). Been retired since 1998, and really enjoying life to the fullest.
0 Replies
 
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Sep, 2007 02:19 am
cicerone imposter wrote:
mismi, You are one of millions of American famiilies in the same plight; more mothers are going into the work force to help increase the household income. I really feel sorry for the young parents of today trying to make a living and working towards helping their children with the expenses of a college education.

I just wanted to let you know that it's okay to let the children work through college and/or owe money on loans. All my siblings and I did not get any money assistance from our parents, but we all managed to get our college education.

When my younger brother graduated from med school, he owed $8,000. When my nephew and niece graduated from med school, they owed $108,000.

It's also important to save for your own retirement so that you donot become a financial burden to your children.

It's a tough call, but I've always felt that people who work themselves through college has more to offer as an employee.


Today, student leaving medical school with an MD could easily have $1 million outstanding in loans.
0 Replies
 
 

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