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The right to take his own life?

 
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jun, 2007 04:21 pm
Chumly wrote:
I note a certain "clockwork" predictability from you.

I have no idea what this post means either. If it was addressed to me, perhaps you could actually explain it so that I might be able to respond.
0 Replies
 
Chumly
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jun, 2007 04:35 pm
joefromchicago wrote:
Chumly wrote:
I note a certain "clockwork" predictability from you.

I have no idea what this post means either. If it was addressed to me, perhaps you could actually explain it so that I might be able to respond.
joefromchicago wrote:
Chumly wrote:
*On further thought I suggest that rehabilitation would be the idealized ethical goal. Now you're going to ask me what I mean by "rehabilitation" and "idealized ethical goal" so I'll answer in part by pointing to the film "A Clockwork Orange" as a solution that went awry, but still suggests some promise.
You're mistaken. I wouldn't have asked you that question.
joefromchicago wrote:
stuh505 wrote:
The shooter in this case is obviously beyond any type of rehabilitation and is a serious threat to other peoples' lives. It would be completely idiotic to waste money in an attempt trying to rehabilitate such as lost cause, and insane to release him back into the public.
What if all that would be required to make Shooter a productive member of society was to give him some medication? Would you still want to terminate him?
Chumly wrote:
I note a certain "clockwork" predictability from you.


Predictably you did turn to the argument of medication / rehabilitation so I have a bit of fun as per
Chumly wrote:
I note a certain "clockwork" predictability from you.
Thus rather unceremoniously you appear to be expanding your "kingdom of myopic relevance" as per
Chumly wrote:
joefromchicago wrote:
I wasn't aware that the Australian penal system was so barbaric.
I wasn't aware that you were the Thread Police. And in that tempestuous tempest in a teapot role, you preside over your artifice of a kingdom of myopic relevance; now where did you put your clothes oh great emperor joefromchicago?

As you seem to have forgotten the title of this thread it is "The right to take his own life?" not joefromchicago's version of what he deems relevant to his understanding of the implications of life sentencing within the context of the Australian penal system.

Chumly kicks ass!
It would appear your advice to me is in order for yourself as per
joefromchicago wrote:
If you want to deviate from the topic of the thread, that's your business. Just don't criticize others who choose to stick with it.
All is not entirely lost however as your uppityness translates into a modicum of entertainment.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Jun, 2007 05:59 pm
Nope, still don't get it. But don't bother trying to explain it again -- I've suddenly lost interest.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 12:31 am
Everyone has a natural right
to end his earthly life whenever he dam pleases.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 12:50 am
damn pleases









:wink:
0 Replies
 
snood
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 04:16 am
OmSigDAVID wrote:
Everyone has a natural right
to end his earthly life whenever he dam pleases.

sez you
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 04:25 am
Joe, if you're still reading, I have a (somewhat) tangential question. I know suicide is no longer a crime in America. But to what degree is assisting suicide still a crime? For example, if I borrowed your gun, then shoot myself in the head with it, would you be legally liable for something? Would it make a difference if I told you what purpose I was borrowing the gun for?
0 Replies
 
stuh505
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 07:09 am
Quote:
NINE states criminalize assisted suicide through common law:

Alabama, Idaho, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, South Carolina, Vermont, West Virginia

THREE states have abolished the common law of crimes and do not have statutes criminalizing assisted suicide :

North Carolina, Utah, Wyoming

In Ohio, that state's supreme court ruled in October 1996 that assisted suicide is not a crime.

In Virginia, there is no real clear case law on assisted suicide , nor is there is a statute criminalizing the act, although there is a statute which imposes civil sanctions on persons assisting in a suicide.

Only Oregon permits physician- assisted suicide.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 08:19 am
Thomas wrote:
Joe, if you're still reading, I have a (somewhat) tangential question. I know suicide is no longer a crime in America. But to what degree is assisting suicide still a crime? For example, if I borrowed your gun, then shoot myself in the head with it, would you be legally liable for something? Would it make a difference if I told you what purpose I was borrowing the gun for?

I don't know how other states treat this, but here's what the Illinois criminal code says:
    [url=http://www.ilga.gov/legislation/ilcs/ilcs4.asp?DocName=072000050HArt%2E+12&ActID=1876&ChapAct=720%26nbsp%3BILCS%26nbsp%3B5%2F&ChapterID=53&ChapterName=CRIMINAL+OFFENSES&SectionID=60636&SeqStart=16500000&SeqEnd=23700000&ActName=Criminal+Code+of+1961%2E](720 ILCS 5/12-31)[/url] Sec. 12-31. Inducement to Commit Suicide. (a) A person commits the offense of inducement to commit suicide when he or she does either of the following: (1) Coerces another to commit suicide and the other person commits or attempts to commit suicide as a direct result of the coercion, and he or she exercises substantial control over the other person through (i) control of the other person's physical location or circumstances; (ii) use of psychological pressure; or (iii) use of actual or ostensible religious, political, social, philosophical or other principles. (2) With knowledge that another person intends to commit or attempt to commit suicide, intentionally (i) offers and provides the physical means by which another person commits or attempts to commit suicide, or (ii) participates in a physical act by which another person commits or attempts to commit suicide. For the purposes of this Section, "attempts to commit suicide" means any act done with the intent to commit suicide and which constitutes a substantial step toward commission of suicide. (b) Sentence. Inducement to commit suicide under paragraph (a)(1) when the other person commits suicide as a direct result of the coercion is a Class 2 felony. Inducement to commit suicide under paragraph (a)(2) when the other person commits suicide as a direct result of the assistance provided is a Class 4 felony. Inducement to commit suicide under paragraph (a)(1) when the other person attempts to commit suicide as a direct result of the coercion is a Class 3 felony. Inducement to commit suicide under paragraph (a)(2) when the other person attempts to commit suicide as a direct result of the assistance provided is a Class A misdemeanor.

In short, if you borrowed my gun and then shot yourself, I wouldn't be liable for assisting your suicide unless I was aware that you intended to kill yourself. If you succeed, I'd be guilty of a class 4 felony (1-3 years imprisonment). If you try and fail, I'd be guilty of a class A misdemeanor (up to a year's imprisonment). I imagine that other states have similar laws.
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 11:38 am
I thought suicide (autohomocide) was a capital crime.

BTW, thanks for that, Joe.
0 Replies
 
Thomas
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 12:01 pm
Thanks!
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 22 Jun, 2007 07:35 pm
JLNobody wrote:
Quote:
I thought suicide (autohomocide) was a capital crime.

Clever.
David
0 Replies
 
BlueAwesomeness
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 07:31 pm
He was put in jail as punishment for his crimes. If he were allowed to kill himself, he would be escaping punishment. Therefore, it should not be allowed.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Jun, 2007 07:35 pm
BlueAwesomeness wrote:
He was put in jail as punishment for his crimes.
If he were allowed to kill himself, he would be escaping punishment.
Therefore, it should not be allowed.

Yes.
Presumably, that is the reason that he attempted suicide.
0 Replies
 
Merry Andrew
 
  1  
Reply Tue 3 Jul, 2007 07:49 pm
JLNobody wrote:
I thought suicide (autohomocide) was a capital crime.

BTW, thanks for that, Joe.


I quite agree, JLN. Anyone found guilty of having committed suicide should face the death penalty. Or, at least, life imprisonment without parole.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 4 Jul, 2007 01:37 am
Is that sentence to be imposed
after he has been CONVICTED of the suicide ?
0 Replies
 
 

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