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Another Dem "exploring"

 
 
Reply Sat 2 Dec, 2006 08:34 pm
Evan Bayh, Senator ( D-In) has reportedly formed a presidential exploratory committee.
Evan Bayh is one of the good ones, conservative & seemingly clean
How many Dems now running or thinking about running or exploring?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 705 • Replies: 18
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xingu
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 05:27 am
And how many Republicans?
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 06:54 am
Good question actually. Made me look if one can find a list somewhere online. Just a list of what candidates have actually set up an exploratory committee, rather than one of candidates that are said, expected or rumoured to make a run. Havent found one yet.
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nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 07:14 am
So lets make a list.

Politicians who have filed their candidacy with FEC:

Republican

Hunter

Democrat

Vilsack

Politicians who have founded exploratory committees:

Republican

Brownback
McCain
Giuliani
Thompson

Democrat

Bayh

(Richardson apparently was reported to have announced his candidacy by Fox, but denied the report.)

----------------

Any additions?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 07:28 am
The National Journal released a new Washington Insiders poll of 70 Congressional lawmakers and 150 political insiders on who they think are the likely Republican and Democratic nominee for the 2008 Presidential election.

Republicans
1. John McCain
2. Mitt Romney
3. Rudy Giuliani
4. Newt Gingrich
5. Mike Huckabee
6. George Pataki
7. Chuck Hagel
8. Condoleezza Rice
9. Sam Brownback
10. Bill Frist


Democrats
1. Hillary Clinton
2. Barack Obama
3. John Edwards
4. Al Gore
5. Evan Bayh
6. Tom Vilsack
7. Bill Richardson
8. Joseph Biden
9. Wesley Clark
10. Christopher Dodd

Source: http://nationaljournal.com/about/njweekly/stories/2006/1208nj1.htm
0 Replies
 
xingu
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 08:00 am
Rice and Frist you can forget. They won't run.

Hillary doesn't have a chance against Obama. He'll get the black vote and Hillary will lose the peace vote because she supports the invasion of Iraq.

I think the big guns in the Republican party will be McCain and Brownback. Brownback will be the darling of the social conservatives. Giuliani, a social liberal will lose the social conservative vote.

But there's still a lot of time for a dark horse to appear.

Hillary, Kerry and Gore are old news and old blood. I think the Democrats will go for new material and not rerun old losers.

It will be fun to watch.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 08:09 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
The National Journal released a new Washington Insiders poll of 70 Congressional lawmakers and 150 political insiders on who they think are the likely Republican and Democratic nominee for the 2008 Presidential election.

Yeah, but thats just another list of speculation. Its easy to find a list with "potential" or "possible" or "likely" candidates - just open any of five dozen opinion polls, they're a dime a dozen.

Its surprisingly hard, on the other hand - or I was just failing - to find a simple list of politicians who have actually taken those concrete first steps - establishing an exploratory committee, filing their candidacy.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 08:27 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
The National Journal released a new Washington Insiders poll of 70 Congressional lawmakers and 150 political insiders on who they think are the likely Republican and Democratic nominee for the 2008 Presidential election.

Republicans
1. John McCain
2. Mitt Romney
3. Rudy Giuliani
4. Newt Gingrich
5. Mike Huckabee
6. George Pataki
7. Chuck Hagel
8. Condoleezza Rice
9. Sam Brownback
10. Bill Frist

Democrats
1. Hillary Clinton
2. Barack Obama
3. John Edwards
4. Al Gore
5. Evan Bayh
6. Tom Vilsack
7. Bill Richardson
8. Joseph Biden
9. Wesley Clark
10. Christopher Dodd
Now if we could only find a way to get Huckabee and Richardson on the same ticket, I would have a comfortable vote.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 08:58 am
xingu wrote:
But there's still a lot of time for a dark horse to appear.


This is something people always seem to forget until the primary season rolls around. Just in my lifetime--Carter was a dark horse, Reagan was a dark horse, and Clinton was a dark horse.

And yes, it will be entertaining.
0 Replies
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 09:55 am
xingu wrote:
Rice and Frist you can forget. They won't run.

Hillary doesn't have a chance against Obama. He'll get the black vote and Hillary will lose the peace vote because she supports the invasion of Iraq.

I think the big guns in the Republican party will be McCain and Brownback. Brownback will be the darling of the social conservatives. Giuliani, a social liberal will lose the social conservative vote.

But there's still a lot of time for a dark horse to appear.

Hillary, Kerry and Gore are old news and old blood. I think the Democrats will go for new material and not rerun old losers.

It will be fun to watch.


Old loser? Seriously whether you like her or not, by what possible standard can you measure Hillary Clinton an old loser?
0 Replies
 
LoneStarMadam
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 10:31 am
The black vote can't carry anybody to the nomination, they're what, 15% of the population? The black vote along with the hispanic vote, could do that. However, I'm not one that believes that all black people nor all hispanics think alike. I believe they're like everybody else, they think for themselves.
0 Replies
 
maporsche
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 10:59 am
LoneStarMadam wrote:
I believe they're like everybody else, they think for themselves.


Everybody but Christian's right? Don't they think for the greater good of humanity, or are they just as selfish as the rest of the world?
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 11:06 am
LoneStarMadam wrote:
The black vote can't carry anybody to the nomination, they're what, 15% of the population? The black vote along with the hispanic vote, could do that. However, I'm not one that believes that all black people nor all hispanics think alike. I believe they're like everybody else, they think for themselves.
Well, would that not also include the 'white' folk? Now, let's just say all the non-black and non-hispanic voters (or a majority of them at least) decide to back the candidate of a different ethnic heritage (because as you so sweetly put it, they think for themselves), now this candidate has the support of hispanics, blacks and others, wouldn't they then be a shoe-in for being elected?

In simpler terms LSM, if the candidate can generate a majority of votes from each segment of the voting population then they can win. It does happen. Happens all the time. Minority candidates do win in communities where they are the minority. It is a matter of what ideas are being presented and how they are presented.

Since you believe that a black or hispanic voter can think beyond the ethnicity of a candidate (in your example then voting for the non-minority candidate); the same can also be said of the non-minority. People are strange...give them a polished politician who knows the right words and how to communicate those same words and they will vote for him or her. Sure, there are those who will not or cannot see beyond outward appearance but that works from all fronts as well.


Just how do you think Bella Abzug got elected? It wasn't stunning beauty. She had ideas, she had an ability to lead and an ability to communicate...and that LSM is a big part of what gets people elected.
0 Replies
 
xingu
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 01:28 pm
Bi-Polar Bear wrote:
xingu wrote:
Rice and Frist you can forget. They won't run.

Hillary doesn't have a chance against Obama. He'll get the black vote and Hillary will lose the peace vote because she supports the invasion of Iraq.

I think the big guns in the Republican party will be McCain and Brownback. Brownback will be the darling of the social conservatives. Giuliani, a social liberal will lose the social conservative vote.

But there's still a lot of time for a dark horse to appear.

Hillary, Kerry and Gore are old news and old blood. I think the Democrats will go for new material and not rerun old losers.

It will be fun to watch.


Old loser? Seriously whether you like her or not, by what possible standard can you measure Hillary Clinton an old loser?


Perhaps not in the same way as Gore or Kerry in that they lost presidential elecetions; or at least Kerry did. But Hillary is too much to the right when it comes to the Iraqi war and a lot of Democrats don't like her position. That, coupled with the black vote going to Obama, if he runs, will, I think, be enough to prevent Hillary from winning the primaries.

Here's the dates for the first Democrat primaries 2008;

18 January-Iowa Caucus
19 January-Nevada Caucus
22 January-New Hampshire Primary
29 January-South Carolina Primary
5 Feburary-Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, New Jersy, New Mexico, North Carolina, Utah

http://www.thegreenpapers.com/P08/
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 02:18 pm
LoneStarMadam wrote:
The black vote along with the hispanic vote, could do that. However, I'm not one that believes that all black people nor all hispanics think alike.

You're right, of course, though blacks and hispanics did show great agreement this year in that they both overwhelmingly voted Democratic. The gains Bush had made among Hispanics in '04, creating a divergence between the two groups in voting patterns, were all swept right back again.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Dec, 2006 03:39 pm
Concerning Evan Bayh, in TNR John B. Judis argues that he showed up his (lack of) spine and scruples in a 2001 vote on bankruptcy reform:

Quote:
Evan Bayh's day of infamy

[..]

What to think? One gauge of Bayh's conviction and character might be what he did on March 13, 2001. That day, the Senate was debating so-called "Bankruptcy Reform," a bill promoted by the credit card companies that made it much harder for consumers to escape debt by declaring bankruptcy. Congress had passed a version of the bill in 2000, but Bill Clinton had vetoed it. Now, with George W. Bush backing the bill and Republicans in control of both houses, it was heading toward a vote.

Some Senate Democrats tried to introduce amendments that would benefit consumers. Diane Feinstein of California and Chris Dodd of Connecticut proposed amendments that would protect minors--particularly college students--against inordinate pressure from credit card companies.

The companies would often pay colleges for access to the students and inundate them with offers--frequently accompanied by gifts--when they arrived on campus. With credit cards in hands, students would then run up large debts on high-priced electronic gadgets and other non-necessities. In 2001, Nellie Mae, the college loan agency, found, 83 percent of undergraduates had at least one credit card (up from 67 percent in 1998), and 47 percent of these had four or more cards. More than one fifth left school with debts between $3,000 and $7,000--and were therefore less able to pay back their college loans. [..]

Feinstein offered a very mild amendment to the bankruptcy bill. It capped the debt limit on credit cards for minors at $2,500 unless they could obtain parental consent or proof of financial independence. Dodd's amendment was somewhat tougher. Companies could only sign up minors if their parents co-signed the credit card agreement or if the minors could prove financial independence or agreed to take a financial management course. Both amendments lost--Feinstein's by 55 to 42 and Dodd's by 58 to 41. The great majority of Democrats voted for these amendments, but not Bayh. He joined the credit card companies and the Republicans in opposing both.

Why did he do it? Bayh didn't say during the debate, and he didn't issue a statement afterwards. [But] there is an obvious explanation for why Bayh would take the credit card companies' side. In states like Indiana, Georgia, Arkansas, Nebraska, Florida, and Montana, where there is not a powerful labor movement [..], Democrats often look to the credit card companies for campaign contributions. [..] Bayh was also a recipient of credit card money. He was tenth among all Senators in 2001-2002 for the receipt of money from finance/credit companies, the year of the vote, and he was tenth in the 2005-2006 session, when the bill finally passed both houses and was signed. So he was paying the companies back for their support.

But it may not be that simple. Feinstein's amendment was a fly on the elephant's hide. While 17 Democratic Senators eventually backed the final bill in March 2005, eight of them also supported Feinstein's amendment in March 2001. They included Baucus, New Mexico's Jeff Bingaman, North Dakota's Kent Conrad, Louisiana's Mary Landrieu, Arkansas's Blanche Lincoln, and Florida's Bill Nelson. Many of these senators were as dependent on credit card contributions as Bayh was, but they were willing to vote their conscience on what was a really a small financial matter to the companies. Not Bayh.

Bayh talks repeatedly about helping families make "higher education more affordable." He and Lincoln recently formed a "Parents' Caucus" in the Senate, declaring that "parents deserve a government that is more supportive of parents' efforts to support their children." But, when he had a chance to protect parents and their children against the greed of the credit card companies--and to do so without paying a great political price--he took what seems like the easy and unprincipled way out.
0 Replies
 
nimh
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Dec, 2006 07:18 pm
You heard it here first .. ;-)

Quote:
KUCINICH JUMPS IN:

In 2008 news, Dennis Kucinich has announced he will soon, well, announce:

    Democratic Rep. Dennis Kucinich, who unsuccessfully ran for president in 2004, said Monday he is planning to run again because his party isn't pushing hard enough to end the war in Iraq. In a statement, Kucinich said he plans to formally announce his candidacy for 2008 on Tuesday at City Hall, where he served as mayor of his hometown in the 1970s.
0 Replies
 
LoneStarMadam
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Dec, 2006 07:47 pm
maporsche wrote:
LoneStarMadam wrote:
I believe they're like everybody else, they think for themselves.


Everybody but Christian's right? Don't they think for the greater good of humanity, or are they just as selfish as the rest of the world?

I can only speak for myself, & i damn sure want the good for everyone, if that turns out to be Obama, good, whereas you, all you seem to be able to do is speak for everyone else, or you seem to think you can.
0 Replies
 
LoneStarMadam
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Dec, 2006 07:51 pm
nimh wrote:
LoneStarMadam wrote:
The black vote along with the hispanic vote, could do that. However, I'm not one that believes that all black people nor all hispanics think alike.

You're right, of course, though blacks and hispanics did show great agreement this year in that they both overwhelmingly voted Democratic. The gains Bush had made among Hispanics in '04, creating a divergence between the two groups in voting patterns, were all swept right back again.

& I did say that it's possible that if blacks & hispanics go for the same candidate that it would be possible for them to name the nominee.
Bush let everyone that voted for him down, not just hispanics or the few more blacks he got in the last presidential vote than he got in 2000. Bush lost this last mid term race, with the help of many of the other republicans, I have no doubt about that.
0 Replies
 
 

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