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Law and Order Politics is a lie

 
 
parados
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Nov, 2006 01:48 pm
LoneStarMadam wrote:
LoneStarMadam wrote:
ebrown_p wrote:
LoneStarMadam wrote:

I absolutely agree with our immigration laws, but unfortunately, about 12 to 20,000,000 mexicans do not agree with those laws, so they break them willy nilly.


Lone Star Madam. New Jersey schools were recently ordered to stop their practice of asking the students in their schools if they were illegal immigrants. They were forced to stop because it is illegal to ask a student her immigration status (since the law guarantees public education for every child living in the US).

Do you absolutely agree with this immigration law? or do you agree that the law against asking students their immigrantion status should be broken willy nilly?


Thjat isn't surprising since our LE in many cities are forbidden to ask for someones citizenship status. All it does is make it much easier for the illegal aliens to keep breaking the law.


State laws can not trump federal law, so the law you speak of, is, well, unlawful. I believe in states rights 100%, but I don't make the laws, so, NJ is wrong.

Which law requires schools to check for immigrant status? The Feds can't do that and there is no law. Such a law would be quickly found unconstitional.
0 Replies
 
okie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Nov, 2006 02:32 pm
ebrown, uh, maybe a dumb question, but why should law abiding U.S. citizens pay taxes to educate non-citizens? This is very bizarre.
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FreeDuck
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Nov, 2006 02:37 pm
Because it's the law?

<snort>
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Nov, 2006 03:45 pm
The premise of this thread is naive. Nixon made "law an order" a political football. The New Left, and their "hippy" adherents laughed at him, and made cartoons of dog turds on lawns with the caption "lawn odor," and sold posters which quoted Adolf Hitler on the subject of law and order.

But they were being stupid, and politically naive. The 1960s had seen race riots in Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles and Washington, among many other cities. In 1968, S. I. Hayakawa was appointed President of San Francisco State College (now SF State University), and became well-known nationally, and popular, because of his hard-nosed approach to student demonstrations. In particular, during student strikes after the assassination of Martin Luther King in 1968, he became famous on the evening news for climbing onto a truck and literally pulling the plug on the public address system at a student rally. His popularity was sufficient that he was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1976, three years after he left SF State.

In 1970, in the aftermath of the Kent State shootings, more than 500 universities and colleges in the United States shut down. That was not the end of it either--riots at Southern Illinois University lead the President of the University, Delight Morris, to call on the governor to send the National Guard, and he finished by expelling the entire student body.

For however much such actions were deplored by the left, they profoundly affected the opinions of the generation of the parents of university students. When Nixon campaigned on a "law and order" platform, and an appeal to the so-called silent majority, he was ridiculed by people on the left, and even by many centrist commentators. Then in November, he absolutely buried George McGovern, garnering more than 18,000,000 more votes than his opponent, and taking 60% of the vote, and all but 18 of the electoral votes. All the charges which grew out of the Watergate debacle, and the fact of the lowest voter turn out in many, many years did not change the facts as politicians understood them--Nixon's law and order slogans had been magic for him.

Appeals to law and order have been, rightfully, seen by politicians ever since as sure winners. Republican or Democrat, no one is going to ridicule an opponent for a law and order platform, and nobody will want to be seen as "soft on crime."

To complain about that is politically naive.
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Nov, 2006 06:17 pm
parados wrote:
Which law requires schools to check for immigrant status? The Feds can't do that and there is no law. Such a law would be quickly found unconstitional.


I'm waiting for a legal citation that says that schools can't ask. The original lawsuit that started all of this was PLYLER v. DOE but no where in the decision did the Supreme Court say that the immigration status couldn't be checked. They did say that illegal immigrants had to be admitted to public schools but they never said that the schools still couldn't ask for the student''s immigration status. Some states (I know NY for sure) have either laws or rules (NY's is a rule issued by the State Education Commissioner - not a law) but I haven't found any Federal law or court ruling that bars schools from asking.
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Cycloptichorn
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Nov, 2006 06:22 pm
Why ask, if you have to admit anyways?

Cycloptichorn
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Nov, 2006 07:26 pm
Because the numbers could possibly effect the amount of state and/or federal aid the school district gets, identify necessary changes in staffing levels or skillsets, etc..
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