1
   

Which Do You Fear?

 
 
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 07:53 am
I think every honest person, with the exception of some very religious (I hesitate to use that word) people who are at total peace with God, very old people who have accepted death, and people who believe death is the end period, would say that they fear death to some degree, but I wonder do we fear death, or is it the way we get there, or the retribution after.

Personally I fear both, but I think that is fairly healthy. I think that a lot of people, were they sure that death was merely a pathway to a better or even a not worse place, with no judgement or retribution, would be offing themselves on a regular basis.

Therefore is judgement and retribution not only a useful tool to keep us in line but also to keep us alive?
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 6,762 • Replies: 88
No top replies

 
Phoenix32890
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 07:59 am
I am one of those "who who believe death is the end period". I do not fear death, but I am concerned about the dying process. Because of that, I have made plans to take matters into my own hands, if and when the need arises.

Quote:
is judgement and retribution not only a useful tool to keep us in line but also to keep us alive?


Perhaps for some, but I think that it would work the opposite way with many people. I think if there was a belief in the afterlife, many people with serious illness would not fight hard enough to stay alive, believing in a better life in the "hereafter".
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 08:02 am
I have a fear of death, predicated upon a pure, physical cowardice. Were i guaranteed of going off gently into that good night, i would be content. I am an atheist, for the simple reason that there are no gods nor godesses. When you die, you're worm food, sorry, that's it, game over, no reset. Fear of the unknown, or, more superstitiously, of the consequences of entering an afterlife, are the province of the credulous.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 08:02 am
Hmmmm - I think I fear the process of getting to be dead more than anything.

I do not tend to think there is too much that needs to be done to make most of us want to stay alive - it seems to be a strongly inbuilt thing - at least once we are mature - adolescents seem rather prey to suicide "clusters" when one in a group does suicide.

Generally, people seem to have to be pretty despairing to kill themselves - or have an immature appreciation of what it really means.

I think fire and brimstone and such were more a product of our fears and a need to control our behaviour while alive than anything.

Do not forget, when most religions were invented, there was a pretty dramatic ongoing struggle for most people to stay alive at all - think of how short the average life span was, and how many lives ended in the cradle - and probably much less time to worry about how happy you were.
0 Replies
 
dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 08:05 am
phoenix "I have made plans to take matters into my own hands, if and when the need arises"
i totally agree but offer questions such as how do you determine "need" and what happens if you become incompetent to act? these are questions running thru my mind currently
0 Replies
 
oldandknew
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 08:17 am
I don't fear death as such, cos it will happen no matter what. Though I have no desire to hasten it's arrival. That would scare me rigid.

My major fear is my "ball & chain" when she gets the real 'ump with me, starts giving out a load of verbal and with it a severe dose of ear ache.
0 Replies
 
husker
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 08:19 am
No Fear.
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 08:23 am
Setanta I think that many who don't believe period, seem to think that those who have faith are somehow less intelligent or backwards or something, and I don't think that's accurate. For many people and I am one, there is a natural connection to something beyond this, or on "the other side", and this feeling is as natural as an itch or the involuntary act of breathing.

It's our interpretations and usage of this connection in our everyday lives that convolutes it and drives people away from it I think.

You either have it or you don't, and that's why they call it faith. It certainly cannot be proven rationally, I agree with that.

And if you have faith and then die and it was bullshit you've lost nothing, but if it's true some folks may be in for a surprise, and I don't mean a nasty one full of fire and brimstone necessarily, but a surprise nonetheless.

Then again, I'm just the karaoke man........
0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 09:00 am
I honestly though I was in terror of death -- but when I faced up to the non-Hodgkins lymphoma treatment, I found out that I was almost blase' about it.

At no point during my illness -- which included me dropping in weight to 114 lbs. and looking like an extra in Schindler's List -- did I ever come even close to fearing the end.

I wasn't happy with what was going on -- the avenue I was taking to what looked like the end -- but I never even thought of trying to hasten it.

I simply dealt with it in a way that makes me tremendously proud of myself.

I hope when the real end comes, I acquit myself as well.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 09:00 am
Bi-Polar Bear wrote:
Setanta I think that many who don't believe period, seem to think that those who have faith are somehow less intelligent or backwards or something, and I don't think that's accurate....


I agree that there is a rational "holding of the nose" as far as religion and "beliefs" are concerned, but I think it is a recent phenomena.


As to your question, I was sure you were asking which do your fear -- Philosophy or Debate? (I was going to choose Debate, since I fear public speaking. Rolling Eyes )

About Death? My mother always told me that it would be an experience not to be missed and as natural as being born. I see the wisdom in that.
As a parent and spouse, there is a greater fear to be the survivor.
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 10:07 am
Hmmm. I don't know that I fear death so much as not living anymore, if that makes any sense. Pain, suffering -- these things irritate me when the crop up, but I don't really fear them, per se -- but, then, I don't really have any fear about, say, being bitten while breaking up a dog fight. If it happens, it happens.

But I really want to continue being alive.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 10:41 am
Piffka wrote:
I agree that there is a rational "holding of the nose" as far as religion and "beliefs" are concerned, but I think it is a recent phenomena.


I'll thank you not to characterize me this way. That's a load of crap. BPB asked for peoples' thoughts, so i gave mine. I find that i treat the religious lunatic fringe with a good deal more courtesy and consideration than do others who hold religious beliefs which are less extreme. That was an unnecessary cheap shot.
0 Replies
 
husker
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 10:58 am
Is It Rational to Fear Death?
0 Replies
 
steissd
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 11:02 am
Well, I am not scared of death, I know that it is inevitable, but I am scared of two things: the process of dying (it depends on cause of death, in case it is cancer it can be very hard) and the possibility to get to the Hell (I make some efforts to avoid such an outcome, but only God knows whether I have succeeded).
0 Replies
 
dream2020
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 11:08 am
Piffka wrote:

About Death? My mother always told me that it would be an experience not to be missed and as natural as being born. I see the wisdom in that.
As a parent and spouse, there is a greater fear to be the survivor.


Being a survivor has always been my fear, too. Being alive and in anguish over loss, or in extreme pain take a kind of courage I don't understand, or want to experience.

On the other hand, Dyslexia's fear of being alive but disroriented and finally helpless, with Alzheimer's or some other debilitating condition, would be something I'd want to avoid. Phoenix says she made arrangements, and that's what I'd want, too. But how do your loved ones decide when it's time for you to go, if you're too incompetent to decide for yourself? I'd rather be dead than put into a nursing home to rot, that's for sure.
0 Replies
 
Piffka
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 11:15 am
Setanta, what is it you object to -- my characterizing this as "holding your nose"? That's a cheap shot? Forgive me. I am astounded at your thin skin and irritability. Or is it that I think it is a recent phenomena?

For you who just said 1) there are no gods or goddesses, 2) there is no afterlife, and 3) that those who believe in an after-life are superstitious or credulous, or both... it is hard to take your complaint at face value. How courteous and considerate can you be when you've just said someone must be superstitious if they believe what they may?

I do think that there has been a rational rush away from belief and it is relatively recent. Is that incorrect?
0 Replies
 
blueveinedthrobber
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 11:35 am
let's don't fight kids, it makes me a sad bear.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 11:35 am
I couldn't characterize what you call a rational rush away from belief as being recent or not, in that i see no evidence of such a rush. Superstition is the belief in supernatural agents, for which noe cannot provide any evidence. Theism falls squarely into such a category. To believe what cannot be demonstrated, and for which no one provides replicable evidence that such a demonstration is possible, is to be credulous.

Yes, it is your use of "holding your nose" to which i object. I lose my temper and get irritable, as does anyone else. On the whole, however, i treat people well, and i do not belittle them for their beliefs. In the context of fora such as these, characterizing what you may choose to believe as superstition does not constitute an active effort to insult or belittle you. I feel that the use of such an expression as "a rational holding of the nose," however, does.
0 Replies
 
husker
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 11:40 am
I love ya Boss!

Quote:
I lose my temper and get irritable, as does anyone else. On the whole, however, i treat people well, and i do not belittle them for their beliefs
Me also errr well I try. Idea Rolling Eyes
0 Replies
 
patiodog
 
  1  
Reply Fri 6 Jun, 2003 11:40 am
Bi-Polar Bear wrote:
let's don't fight kids, it makes me a sad bear.


so long as it's not an angry bear. squinney's been feeding you lately, right?
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

How can we be sure? - Discussion by Raishu-tensho
Proof of nonexistence of free will - Discussion by litewave
morals and ethics, how are they different? - Question by existential potential
Destroy My Belief System, Please! - Discussion by Thomas
Star Wars in Philosophy. - Discussion by Logicus
Existence of Everything. - Discussion by Logicus
Is it better to be feared or loved? - Discussion by Black King
 
  1. Forums
  2. » Which Do You Fear?
Copyright © 2020 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.04 seconds on 09/21/2020 at 07:41:45