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we went to "church" yesterday

 
 
Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 10:41 am
blacksmithn wrote:
We should be truly Christian and declare a crusade against Unitarians. What could be more Christian than rapine and slaughter in the name of God?


walking through life surrounded by a glowing mantle of smugness........ oh yeah, and buggering a few altar boys?
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 12:33 pm
ebrown_p wrote:
real life wrote:
The assumption that a UU service is representative of Christianity at large is an error.

UU are generally considered to be an extreme fringe group, denying nearly all of traditional Christian teachings, while trying to hold the Christian label to attract attendance.

This may appeal to some who don't like Christian teaching, I'm simply pointing out the fact that there's not much that's Christian in the UU.


This is so true. I went to a UU service and I was shocked at how un-Christian it was.

They talked love for your neighbors. They supported peace. They talked about forgiving enemies. They cared for the poor. They were non-judgemental and offered a welcome to people of any lifestyle.

Jesus himself couldn't be less of a Christian.


Laughing Too true, ebrown_p!

real life, there are few UUs who consider themselves Christian. While there are a few UU Christian Fellowship churches, they represents a very small portion of American UUs. The sources of the UU Principles include Judeo-Christian, Buddhist and other eastern tradition, earth-centric, and humanist traditions. I don't know of any UU Church that 'pretends' to be Christian in order to attract attendance. Unitarians and Universalists were independent religions, off-shoots of the New England Puritans. The Unitarians rejected the concept of the Holy Trinity and the Universalists rejected the concept of predestination and hell. They merged in 1961 to form the Unitarian Universalist Association. Good info and background can be found in this Wikipedia article

UUs are an extreme fringe group? That's actually pretty funny. What's so extreme or fringe about any of the following?

We, the member congregations of the Unitarian Universalist Association, covenant to affirm and promote

* The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
* Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
* Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
* A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
* The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
* The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
* Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.


Dys, sorry to hear you were turned off. It sounds like you found a group that is more 'high church' than some.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 01:27 pm
Well, the worst thing was, there was this gay person who got up in front of EVERYONE and talked about having gone to the GAY olympics. how freakin' weird is that?
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 01:59 pm
Laughing Shameful!
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Bi-Polar Bear
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 02:03 pm
My Unitarian Jihad name is Brother Shotgun of Patience dys but really... a filthy queer testifying in the house of The Lord Whoever or Whatever You Perceive Him/Her/It to be? That's enough to try anyone's patience.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 02:04 pm
Bi-Polar Bear wrote:
My Unitarian Jihad name is Brother Shotgun of Patience dys but really... a filthy queer testifying in the house of The Lord Whoever or Whatever You Perceive Him/Her/It to be? That's enough to try anyone's patience.

Thought I was going to barf, I did.
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dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 03:32 pm
Re: we went to "church" yesterday
dyslexia wrote:
The lady Diane suggested that we need to expand our social horizons so yesterday we went to a Unitarian/Universialist "church." What a crock that was;
"let's all hold hands while we sing hymn 157"
I was very polite and did not bold out the door until the "service" was finished but we will not be going back.


What were you actually expecting, prithee?
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JPB
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 03:54 pm
On UU services ~~ there are many different 'flavors' of UU churches and fellowships. The larger churches tend to be more 'high church and high liturgy' and the smaller churches and fellowships tend to be more laid back. First Unitarian of Albuquerque has over 600 members and is one of the largest churches in the US. It wouldn't surprise me a bit if their service seemed 'churchy'. On the other hand there are 6 other UU churches and fellowships within 25 miles that have fewer than 100 people and 2 that have 100-300. Each of them will have their own tone. Some have ministers, some are lay led. Some have music/hymns, some don't. Depending on the minister and congregational wants some seem downright Christian, others seem almost secular.

I'm not trying to talk you into anything, dys, just explaining that they are all different.
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 04:58 pm
JPB wrote:
On UU services ~~ there are many different 'flavors' of UU churches and fellowships. The larger churches tend to be more 'high church and high liturgy' and the smaller churches and fellowships tend to be more laid back. First Unitarian of Albuquerque has over 600 members and is one of the largest churches in the US. It wouldn't surprise me a bit if their service seemed 'churchy'. On the other hand there are 6 other UU churches and fellowships within 25 miles that have fewer than 100 people and 2 that have 100-300. Each of them will have their own tone. Some have ministers, some are lay led. Some have music/hymns, some don't. Depending on the minister and congregational wants some seem downright Christian, others seem almost secular.

I'm not trying to talk you into anything, dys, just explaining that they are all different.

I hear that and we have not tossed in the towel. others will be attended.
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ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 05:10 pm
Dys, I second Dlowan's question... If they had sung hymn 157 without holding hands would you have been happier?
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boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 05:14 pm
You and Diane are invited to attend The Church of I Can't Believe It's Not Butter!

Fresh muffins and mimosas every Sunday morning.

I read a passage of whatever book I happen to have handy.

In the summer we swim after church.

In the winter we drink extra mimosas and splash in puddles.
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 05:21 pm
dys : didn't they at least offer some wine Laughing Question
or is that a different church Question Confused
hbg
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snood
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 05:21 pm
Hey Dys - My girl and I have been considering trying the United Methodist Church around here,, so your attempt was interesting to me.

What would have made it a "good" experience, in the balance?
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dyslexia
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 05:22 pm
ebrown_p wrote:
Dys, I second Dlowan's question... If they had sung hymn 157 without holding hands would you have been happier?

Well, singing hymns ain't my idea of good times but holding hands pretty much killed my joy.(so I put my hand down the lady Dianes shirt and just fondled her boobs)
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hamburger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 05:31 pm
snood wrote : "What would have made it a "good" experience, in the balance? "

i don't think dys is satisfied easily Laughing ,
perhaps a little orgy might have made him enjoy it :wink: Question
hbg

like in the good old days ?
http://www.wga.hu/art/h/hogarth/rake_3.jpg
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ebrown p
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 05:43 pm
A few years back I accepted (after much prodding) an invitation to my sister-in-law's Pentacostal Church for the specical occasion of my nieces Christening.

This church was a far cry from the staid New England Protestant churches I am familiar with. There was hand waving, foot stomping... the whole bit. People would occasionally let out a cry and fall over unconcious into the arms of the person behind them (I never figured out how they organized that to make sure that there was someone behind them before they fell over... but miraculously no one was dropped).

What I didn't know was that she had chosen me to be the godfather for her daughter. She somehow neglected to tell me this before the ceremony.

In fact I had no clue of my role until in the middle of this frenetic ceremony... I was called forward.. in Spanish to the front of the church.

The pastor (who apparently thinks I know what I am there for) starts asking me if I will accept the responsibility to raise my god-daughter to always obey Christ. Now, I am conversational in Spanish, but it is not my first language especially in a pressure situation.

So I was standing there in front of the swaying expectant congregation, trying to think of how to gracefully not answer these questions without making a scene.

I kind of nodded at each question and feigned stupidity, and hoped that people would interpret my discomfort with a lack of language ability).Fortunately people started handwaving and falling over again which actually may have been in answer to my prayers at that moment.

My sister-in-law didn't understand why I didn't want to stay for supper after the service.
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spendius
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 06:03 pm
It must have been a serious crisis if you turned down free eats with the sister-in-law.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 06:53 pm
Last time I attended church services- -Hmmm.
I guess it was 1964. My best buddy, a 7th Day Adventist wanted me to see that his church was a good one. Aside from mighty boredom, I can't recall that much about the whole affair. Suffice to say, I have not allowed myself to be so cajoled since.
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Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 06:58 pm
You let a less than desireable experience 42 years ago determine that you would remain outside? I am sure that there must be more to it than that.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Sep, 2006 07:21 pm
Intrepid wrote:
You let a less than desireable experience 42 years ago determine that you would remain outside? I am sure that there must be more to it than that.


Well, yes, the fact of me being an atheist has a lot to do with it.
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