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How important is a CV boot?

 
 
phiber
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Jul, 2004 10:27 pm
Re: How important is a CV boot?
sweepstop wrote:
I was told my CV boot was torn. Is this critical and how much $$ will it cost to replace? BTW, i have a 1991 honda Accord. Thanks for the advice


Hmmm! It would pay to get the CV boot repaired asap, but ask a mechanic to check that the CV joint has not been damaged. If it has, you will be wasting your money...... you don't want to do the job twice!

I had the luxury of replace two of the bastards, but was worth the effort and cost.
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GeneralTsao
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2004 08:20 pm
sac wrote:
Are you talking stock cars, or racer joe cars, which the latter has given Honda a nasty reputation (can't wait till the boys grow up).

When would one need drag links and such and what do they do?


I was just mentioning some random components manufactured by Moog, since I have experience with that line. Not all the components I mentioned are applicable to all autos.

Furthermore, I don't know if Moog makes axles. I was basically standing up for aftermarket parts, and giving examples.

Very rarely do I ever buy OEM parts because equal or better quality can be had for 1/2 the price of OEM by buying good quality aftermarket.

FYI: a drag link is a steering component not found on front wheel drive cars. Tie rod is also steering related, but on more traditional steering systems (recirculating ball, for one); not on rack-and-pinion.

General Tsao
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Adrian
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Jul, 2004 09:05 pm
Quote:
not on rack-and-pinion.


Might want to check that General.
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GeneralTsao
 
  1  
Reply Thu 8 Jul, 2004 05:49 am
Adrian wrote:
Quote:
not on rack-and-pinion.


Might want to check that General.



Oops! Embarrassed Thanks, Adrian! I was thinking tie rod, as in the five-or-so-foot-long tie rod. I should have been more clear in that statement.

Thanks for catching my error and bringing it to my attention. Smile

General Tsao
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amkdc
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jul, 2004 07:59 am
Hello all! New to this forum and able2know as well. Just got back from the Volkwagen dealer where I had my '99 Passat serviced for 55,000 miles. Was told that I need a CV boot replacement that will run about $220 total for parts and labor. Is that about right for a VW? I don't hear any "clicking" noises as I turn (I see previous postings mentioning this noise). Is it only a matter of time before I do? How quickly do I need this replacement? I'm not a cheapskate, just don't want to be taken for a ride! Thanks.
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sac
 
  1  
Reply Fri 9 Jul, 2004 08:11 am
You can always get a second opinion- go to another shop, ask around. Do some I'net searches.

I only know Hondas, as that's what I own; however, if you hear clicking, you've waited too long. That's when the axle needs to be replaced due to damage to the bearings from road crap.

From what I have learned, replacing an axle is an easier job than the boot, and the cost is comparable (on Honda, or the Civic, as in my model).

S
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tinsoldier
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2004 03:53 pm
Just recently I was told the front right outer CV Boot on my '94 Nissan 4x4 was torn. There is no clicking like people have mentioned in other post so I am making the assumption (and all the inherent risks of doing so) that the CV joint is OK. There are 73K miles on the truck and I drove it pretty heavily in 4wd this last winter which I am guessing contributed to the wear and tear on the boot.

The estimate given to me was $340 which seems high from what other people have said... definitely going to look around.

My real question is this--

My truck is rear wheel drive but its a front boot that is torn. Am I risking damage to the CV joint only when I engage the front wheel drive (rather, the 4wd) or are the front CV joints active even when in 2wd (rear wheel drive only) and are susceptible to damage in daily driving?
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2004 04:13 pm
tinsoldier wrote:
My real question is this--

My truck is rear wheel drive but its a front boot that is torn. Am I risking damage to the CV joint only when I engage the front wheel drive (rather, the 4wd) or are the front CV joints active even when in 2wd (rear wheel drive only) and are susceptible to damage in daily driving?


Huh? If your truck is rear-wheel drive then you don't have the option of running in front-wheel drive only mode. You only have rear-wheel (2WD) or 4-wheel drive.

It doesn't matter though. The CV joint can be damaged at any time. The damage comes from water and duirt/duct collecting in the grease on the CV joint. If the boot is torn you can bet they'll find they're way in there. If your truck has auto locking hubs (which most do nowadays) then the entire front end is being driven all the time anyway. Manual locking hubs would allow you to "free wheel" the front wheels so the CV joints wouldn't spin unless you were in 4WD mode.
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tinsoldier
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2004 04:24 pm
Sorry if I phrased some things badly but you more or less deciphered what I meant. Smile

Perhaps you could help clarify auto locking hubs -- I don't have to get out of the truck to lock the hubs, though they only lock if I actually shift (through a stick shift type thing) into 4wd hi/lo. To unlock them I have to stop and back the truck up 10 ft or so....

thanks for your help
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Jul, 2004 09:09 pm
You have automatic hubs. If you had manual hubs you'd have to get out and flip a small lever in the center of the wheel hub on each front wheel and then shift into 4WD to use 4WD.

The automatic hubs are a lot easier to use when you need 4WD but it means that the front axle is being driven by the front wheels when you are in 2WD mode and that cuts down on your gas mileage a little and you have wear and tear on the front axle that you wouldn't have with manual hubs.
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PrairieDawnC
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 04:23 pm
Re: torn CV boots
JustinCase wrote:
I have been replacing CD boots on my Subaru every year for the last eight years. They tear very quickly, and I hear clicking (means axle must be replaced, too) within months. Turns out the engine mounts are broken. If you have a torn boot, have this checked!


Thanks, JustinCase!

Our '89 Eagle Vista wagon -- an oldie but with very few miles on it -- is needing its 7th axle in 4 years. Other than engine mounts, is there anything else that could cause this? We're going nuts with the expense!

...Pam
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 06:28 pm
All this talk about cv boots has me wondering. The main reason they need to be replaced is because they dry out, become brittle and crack, allowing the elements to invade.

Why not just keep the boot well lubricated? Cover it with vaseline or silicon on a montlhy basis.

Wouldn't that be a good maintenance program?

Or am I missing something here?
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Adrian
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 06:36 pm
It's a very good idea Gus.

The best is to use silican spray about once a month.
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 06:41 pm
I would think the vaseline would be a better idea. If you use silicone spray there's a possibility of the overspray coating your rotors.
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Adrian
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 06:52 pm
Yeah but it's easier.

Spreading vaseline over them would be a pain in the bum.

Vaseline is meant to be used to prevent pains like that.
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 07:12 pm
I'd think smearing vaseline (or axle grease) on there would create a nice big sticky area to collect a lot of dust, sand and road grime.

There are some companies out there that make some rubber conditioners that might work (most are meant for tires, etc..). Not sure how much they'd help prolong the life of the darn things.

http://www.cyclecare.com/formula4.cfm
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gustavratzenhofer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 07:17 pm
It seems to me, fishin', that vaseline essentially restores the rubber to the original condition. It soaks in and the rubber is nice and pliable. I don't think there'd be any left on the surface to collect dust, sand, and road grime.

Vaseline is also great for use on your rubber door gaskets. Ever get that whistling noise from a poor seal? Little vaseline on the door gaskets and you're back to a nice quiet ride.
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fishin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 07:45 pm
I guess it would depend on how much ya put on. I'm usually not verra neat with that sort of thing so I'd just end up slathering on a big old handful of the stuff. Wink
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GeneralTsao
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Jul, 2004 09:57 pm
Armor All would be the thing to use, though I doubt that would solve the problem.

Rubber which is not exposed to sunlight or intense heat won't dryrot and crack. I don't think the CV boots get any sunlight, and I doubt the heat is intense.

Is it possible that the quality of the boots you've been using every year is not very good? Better rubber/vinyls have good plasticizers in them.
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subaruguy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Aug, 2004 09:01 am
subaru cv axle
Hi,
I was told by my mechanic that subaru does not make a kit enabling the boot to be replaced separately from the axle. Is this true. The cost is around $600. Please help.
0 Replies
 
 

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