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How important is a CV boot?

 
 
isak
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Mar, 2004 09:04 am
What I did...
My boot was badly torn, but I found out quick because the grease in the boot sprayed onto the exhaust pipe and stunk soooo bad. So I did not have any clicking sound when I went to the mechanic.

It was his recommendation to replace the half axle rather than just the boot because replacing just the boot is very labor intensive. I replaced the half-axle with a rebuilt one that has a 1-year warranty for $180.

Don't know if that helps, but it's something.

I think that you have a popping noise at all suggests you have debris in the joint.
0 Replies
 
JustinCase
 
  1  
Reply Fri 16 Apr, 2004 04:56 am
torn CV boots
I have been replacing CD boots on my Subaru every year for the last eight years. They tear very quickly, and I hear clicking (means axle must be replaced, too) within months. Turns out the engine mounts are broken. If you have a torn boot, have this checked! The mounts are another $500 above the axles, but without that, you'll pay $500 a year. Bad brakes could also cause excess heat and boot failure.
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connie4
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Jun, 2004 06:27 pm
I've just been told that two CV boots on my Civic DX are torn or broken and need to be replaced. This was "discovered" as part of a standard 60,000 mile service by the dealer, who is recommending replacing all four (although nothing is wrong with the other two) and wants to charge $500+ for it. This is a 5 year old car. I've never had to replace a CV boot in any other car I've owned. So I went looking for information and happened on this thread and site.

From what I'm gathering $500 is out of line to replace a CV boot. There should have been some symptom (clicking or grease) of this (there isn't).

So a number of questions. First, is what I've gathered correct? Also, why should multiple CV boots tear or break with nothing else happening? Is what I've been told fishy? Is it worth getting a second opinion (no less a second estimate which definitely sounds worth while)?

If I look for an alternative source how will I know a good one?

Thanks for any advice you can provide.
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connie4
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2004 06:47 pm
Hope to hear back from folks at some point here.

It's been a real experience. Just having some of the comments in this thread really helped.

What I've found is that some mechanics are using the CV boot as an excuse to expand their bill to a full or half axle. One finally said to me that they don't just do CV boots. It's just not worth it for the smaller bill (at least they were honest).

Some also want to include the inner CV boot (although a couple pointed out that its rarely the innner CV boot that needs replacing). Others want to replace all the CV boots just for the heck of it.

It was worth being very clear that it was only the outer CV boot, that it wasn't a high mileage car (that was the excuse for the axle replacement in one case), that there was no noise, that it was just cracked and not broken, and that it had just been noticed. Apparenly all of these things serve to allow the repair shops excuses to raise the prices. Knowing what I needed and being firm seemed to get me better success. Or maybe I just found the more reputable places later.

My estimates for two CV outer boots ranged from $180 to $550. So its definitely worth shopping around and being clear exactly what you need.
0 Replies
 
fishin
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Jun, 2004 07:31 pm
Your estimates will vary greatly depeninding on a lot of things. Dealers tend to be a lot higher that a general garage for example and slow garages will charge less than very busy ones. Sometimes, (not always!) it's also an indicator of the quality of work you can expect. Why is a good honest mechanic so hard to find?

If you aren't hearing any clicking at all (especially when turning) then the CV joints themselves haven't been damaged yet and the boot is just torn. If you got a $180 estimate I'd just go with it and get the outer boots replaced.
0 Replies
 
GeneralTsao
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jun, 2004 11:42 pm
connie4 wrote:
Hope to hear back from folks at some point here.

It's been a real experience. Just having some of the comments in this thread really helped.

What I've found is that some mechanics are using the CV boot as an excuse to expand their bill to a full or half axle. One finally said to me that they don't just do CV boots. It's just not worth it for the smaller bill (at least they were honest).

Some also want to include the inner CV boot (although a couple pointed out that its rarely the innner CV boot that needs replacing). Others want to replace all the CV boots just for the heck of it.

It was worth being very clear that it was only the outer CV boot, that it wasn't a high mileage car (that was the excuse for the axle replacement in one case), that there was no noise, that it was just cracked and not broken, and that it had just been noticed. Apparenly all of these things serve to allow the repair shops excuses to raise the prices. Knowing what I needed and being firm seemed to get me better success. Or maybe I just found the more reputable places later.

My estimates for two CV outer boots ranged from $180 to $550. So its definitely worth shopping around and being clear exactly what you need.


It is also important to know that replacing CV boots on one car may be a $150 job while on another car it may be a $550 job.

The parts will all cost about the same, but on some cars, you must do a lot of crazy things before you can remove the half-axle in order to replace the boot.

Back when I was in the biz, some shops would use a split boot--that is, one which can be opened up and snapped over the axle, thus avoiding having to remove the half-axle.

We found that this saved a lot of time, but we didn't feel that the split boot would be watertight or as durable, so we discontinued using them.

Split boots may not be available anymore, I don't know. Or perhaps they are better today than in 1987.

But your price will be affected by how much labor has to go into the job at hand.

It is very likely that the station that is "trying to upsell" you on axle replacement may be doing you a big favor...and spare you trouble and expense down the road (no pun intended).

General Tsao
0 Replies
 
sac
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Jul, 2004 07:54 pm
Axel vs. Boot can depend on the age of the car, too
it's an odd occurance when one is acutely attuned to their car, and begin hearing noises; i started hearing the clicking as early as one week ago. i knew one boot was ripped, but was waiting. . for something.

150.00 each side- rebuilt axel
i am doing both sides, because (well, because both are now ripped) it's a 1991 honda civic base model with 160k miles.
those bearings are beat!
runs like a champ, tho

labor will be whatever the mechanic wants - this at the dealer (honda) where i know the service dude. so i get the comfort of the dealer backing it and the labor of the mechanic (usually MUCH lower than the dealer charges)

i have replaced the boots once (90k), and a second time on one at 120k - it really is too soon for it to be popped, but never really know why this happens. i also think it's a better job if one buys the axel; no one is screwing around with the boot.
S
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Confused
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 01:48 am
Hi there. I have a car problem and I need an opinion. I have a 96 Honda Accord (83K) and one or both of the CV boot outers of my car is/are leaking. I took my car to Honda and they suggested that I have them replace the boots (both the inner and the outer ones) for me for over $480.00. I called another shop and they suggested that I replace both axles (with boots on them) for around $300.00. Their reason for this is because if the CV joints have been contaminated with dirt, etc. and only the CV boots were replaced, then problems (knocking sound) could arise in 6-8 months. As a result I would pay them $300 twice (it costs the same to replace the boots and to replace the axles).

When I went back to Honda and explained what the other shop had suggested me to do, they said it is best to preserve the original axle because they are better quality than the after market ones. I called the other shop and they told me the opposite; that the after market axles are built better than the original part. Who is right in your opinion? What would be the best thing to do at this point?

I really need to get this problem solved real soon since I'm going on a long trip next month. I will appreciate anybody's reply. Thanks.

P.S. This problem was discovered back in January but I haven't heard any noise from the car even when I make a turn, so I'm assuming that the cv joints are still okay.
0 Replies
 
fishin
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 08:11 am
Have your garage replace the axles for the $300 and be done with it!
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GeneralTsao
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 12:52 pm
If you've been running with busted-open CV boots since January, you definately need to replace the CV joints by now.

It's often cheaper to replace the axles than the joints.

Like with anything you buy, there are quality differences. You need to hire a mechanic who does not buy his parts from Advance Auto or Auto Zone or other "DIY" consumer-oriented parts houses.

A good mechanic will buy good parts, and those parts will come from Car Quest, Napa, or other reputable full-service parts house or auto dealership.

Good-quality parts will cost more than cheap ones.

Find out whose parts your mechanic will be using, and what warranty the parts and the mechanic give.

Some garages will give you a choice of parts--cheaper, or better. Always choose the better, unless you're selling the car in the next few months (and I never sell my cars--it's cheaper to keep them).

General Tsao
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sac
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 05:06 pm
more on axels
I was told it was all Honda remanufactured parts on the axels. This was recommended over any other part/s, and recommended further because of the mileage on my car (160k)

Of course, this is via a Honda dealership. I would have it no other way.

I also need rotors/pads; will NOT EVER get after market, no matter the cost. Unless I was selling my car, it makes sense to have the quality of Honda parts.

Also the master cylinder has reared its ugly head ($200.00 part).

HEY! Still beats a car payment! And I might be stupid enough to get an ugly SUV if not busy saving my old standby $7100.00 car that holds up against ANY American car, still.

the end


0 Replies
 
Adrian
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 05:47 pm
Just so you know... Honda do not manufacture ANY of their own spare parts. Pads, rotors, master cylinders, CV boots, CV joints, axles, none of it is made by Honda.

There is no such thing as a GENUINE Honda part unless you are talking about body panels or engine parts.

Nothing else to add, it just annoys me when people start with the "aftermarket bashing".
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sac
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 08:26 pm
I am not in the freakin business. And I didnt write down exactly what the service guy said; he only said something to the affect that it is backed by Honda or was made as a Honda part. He's been in the business for 20 years, and he doesn't make stuff up.

But when I know more, I will let you know. And as it stands now, I believe HONDA makes it all! They even made the lightbulb I replaced - I think it said Standard on it, but I think it's Honda!

Aftermarket bashing: damned if I will use rotors from "Automaker Plus," or some such AFTERMARKETeer.

Now, I did use an AFTERMARKET radiator- so far the China part is holding up, bad welds and all
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GeneralTsao
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 08:57 pm
Actually, a lot of aftermarket parts are very good--better than OEM, in many cases. For example,

For some parts I like Moog (idler arms, drag links, tie rod ends, etc.).

For ignition parts, I like Standard.
0 Replies
 
sac
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 09:05 pm
Are you talking stock cars, or racer joe cars, which the latter has given Honda a nasty reputation (can't wait till the boys grow up).

When would one need drag links and such and what do they do?
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Confused
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 09:25 pm
Thanks for the quick reply, guys--Fishin/Gen.Tsao. I have thought about replacing the axles instead of just the boots; however, a Honda service counselor told me that once I replace the original axles, it is more than likely that I will have to replace them every year because of the inferior quality of these after market parts. He said that that's what happened to his wife when she replaced her car's axles (Mazda).

I didn't know what to do after he said that. I'm afraid he might be right. I don't know if it is true that Honda's original axles are better than the aftermarket ones or not. This is what led me to post this question here. I've written several web sites about this but with no luck--no one responded except here. Thanks again. I'll follow your advice, Gen. Tsao. I'll keep you guys posted. See ya soon.
0 Replies
 
Adrian
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 09:42 pm
Quote:
once I replace the original axles, it is more than likely that I will have to replace them every year because of the inferior quality of these after market parts.


ABSOLUTE CRAP!

Honda are renowned for this sort of rubbish.

If the tears in the CV boots are minor and the joint is still well packed with grease, then there is NO need to replace the entire axle. Just replace the boots that are cracked. If you are in any way mechanically minded you can do it yourself. The boots themselves are cheap as piss.

Replacing ENTIRE subassemblies to fix minor problems is a classic money making venture used by mechanics of all flavours. GENUINE dealer mechanics are TRAINED to do this. They are also trained to slander aftermarket parts as a basic rule of thumb. Many of the parts that are packaged as "Genuine" parts are sourced from the same manufacturers that supply the aftermarket.

I am NOT 100% here, but as far as I know Honda DO NOT manufacture brake rotors, axles, CV joints or radiators.

Car "manufacturers" don't manufacture much. Most of what they do is assembly.
0 Replies
 
sac
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 09:51 pm
These are all very good points to bring up to the people I know who are MANY years working on Honda cars. One is a master mechnic (20 years Honda alone), who I shoot the breeze with frequently.

I can almost not wait till Tuesday!

Hey, how much is piss nowadays anyway?

Wink
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Adrian
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 09:56 pm
Please do! Very Happy

And please let me know what he tells you. Twisted Evil
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sac
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Jul, 2004 10:21 pm
from honda ownerlink.com
<<where are the axels!?>>

HONDA GENUINE REMANUFACTURED PARTS
Although no part can last forever, we are able to remanufacture many of our genuine parts to like-new standards through a sophisticated process.

The Honda remanufacturing process involves a complete disassembly, full-scale cleaning and inspection of every component. Parts not up to our specifications are replaced with new Honda Genuine Parts.

Once reassembled, testing is designed to assure that the remanufactured part performs at the same high level as its brand new counterpart.

Honda Genuine Remanufactured Parts that we
offer include:

Transmissions
Alternator
Starter Motor
Power Steering Pumps
Power Steering Racks
ABS Modulators
Brake Calipers

Every Honda Genuine Remanufactured Part comes fully backed by our nationwide replacement parts warranty.* And unlike many other parts warranties, ours includes labor - one of the best warranties in the business.
0 Replies
 
 

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