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Le Tour 2006 - A Virtual Cultural Trip

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 10:18 am
Please ask her what else I could do for her.
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 10:44 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Please ask her what else I could do for her.
DHL waterzoi
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 10:47 am
Next time ... Laughing
Mrs. W., btw, isn't interested in this thread: training on suduko, wants to be fit(ter) until October ... :wink:
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 11:31 am
On Sunday, the Tour is around the "Morbihan", in less than eight weeks time, I'll surely post a couple of fresh photos from there on a new thread Laughing

http://www.marinamap.com/artimg/pic-2.jpg

Belle Île is exactly that - an Beautiful Island. The largest of the Breton islands, it was a favourite haunt for Saxon pirates and Norman invaders until given to the abbey of Redon in 1006.



Belle Ile, by Henri Moret

http://www.canvaz.com/henri-moret/henri-moret-007.jpg

http://www.jimloy.com/arts/monet13.jpg

Rocher à Belle Ile, Claude Monet

Storm off the Belle Ile Coast, Claude Monet

http://www.monetreproductions.com/art/images/s27.jpg
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 11:39 am
Superb Ile, superb paintings...
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 11:42 am
"Qui voit Groix, voit sa joie" - the one who sees Groix, sees his good luck.

Groix
To reach the Île de Groix you have to start from Lorient - leaving the car behind. A 45-minute crossing brings you to an eight kilometre by four kilometre realm of sheer, dramatic cliffs and sheltered, sandy beaches.

In the XVIIc and XVIIIc, Groix's prosperity was intricately linked to that of Lorient and its pursuit of East India trade. Lorient languished as India fell increasingly into British hands, and Groix found a new source of sustenance in tuna fishing.

By 1880 it was France's premier tuna port, and a 1900 census counted 198 tuna-fishing craft on Groix out of a total of 268 for Brittany.


http://fredphotos2.free.fr/Fredphotos.tk/Groix/images/gr005---dia_072.jpg

http://enguerrand.gourong.free.fr/images/Groix%20photaer%20.gif

http://www.sante.univ-nantes.fr/med/laser/images/groix.jpg
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 12:24 pm
Today's recipe is something simple: Huîtres au cidre

http://www.bassindarcachon.com/public/huitre/prod_5.jpg http://bdi2.chateauonline.com/fr/Articles/Cidre-Pays2.jpg http://www.geocities.com/healingfrequencies/ancientfootsteps/cidre.gif

For 4 persons

12 greater oysters
400 ml Cidre
2 tomotoes
1 carrot
1 celery
a bit garlic
a bit chervil
3 shallots
150 ml cream
80 g butter
sugar
salt
pepper

Open the oysters and put them out. Keep the oyster-water.
Roast the shallots, the carrot, the garlic ... in 30 g butter and than add the cidre.
Reduce the liquid to the half.
Add the oyster-water and the cream.
Reduce again to ta half.
Take the pot from the oven, poach the oysters for about 2 minutes.

Take the oysters out of the liquid, add salt, pepper, sugar ... how you like it.

Add the cold butter (in small pieces) and stir until frothy.

Put the oysters either in the (warmed up) shells or on a dish, arrange small pieces of tomotoe around it, pour the sauce over it and finally decorate it with the chevril.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 12:31 pm
As said, I'll be in that region in some weeks time ...

staying here http://i6.tinypic.com/1zd6o0y.jpg

... and will post than more, different pics from that departemant (and Nantes). :wink:
0 Replies
 
J-B
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 08:39 pm
12 oysters for 4 people? Is it enough?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 11:38 pm
^JB^ wrote:
12 oysters for 4 people? Is it enough?


I don't think it to be a main course - you certainly can add as many as you want :wink:
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J-B
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 02:55 am
Well, I just don't have any concept of how large an oyster can be... :wink:
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 11:46 am
Tomorrow will be a day of rest, flying from Britanny down to the South-West

http://i6.tinypic.com/1zf3ket.jpg



So, I'd like to show some pics from one of the most astonishing and artful statues ..



The Parish Enclosures

Opening through a triumphal gate, the Enclosure is the link between the world of the living and that of the dead. Generally located around a cemetery, the Enclosure incorporated the church, the charnel-house and the Calvary. Since the area of the Enclosure and of the cemetery was restricted, the remains of the dead were regularly removed from the tombs in order to save room. The bones were placed in a special building called a charnel-house or ossuary. A Calvary is a granite monument with Christ on the Cross and various personages from the Passion. Specifically Breton, it recounts episodes from the Holy Story and in former times was used by Curates for religious instruction. The Calvary is in some ways the development of the wayside crosses encountered in their thousands throughout the Breton countryside. The main Parish Enclosures are found in Finistère at Guimiliau, Lampaul- Guimiliau, Saint-Thégonnec, La Martyre, Commana, Sizun and Pleyben.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 11:46 am
Small

http://www.cleden-cap-sizun.com/photos/calvaire_pointe_du_van_est.jpg

A bit larger

http://www.sene.com/phototheque/galerieimage/photos4oct2002/images/calvaire%20montsarrac%20globale.jpg
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 11:46 am
Most common seize

http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~wulfric/varia/photos-fr/bretagne_calvaire1.jpg


Large

http://p.ribot.free.fr/Images/calvaire66.jpg
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 11:51 am
Walter...huitre au cidre...

One of these days I'm going to learn how to cook.

It will be after I learn to open an oyster without swearing.

9 mins to go now...Allez les Huitres
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 11:56 am
In Plougastel, for instance, there are 28 crosses.

http://i6.tinypic.com/1zf4daw.jpg

With this woodcut by Gaugain - Calvaire Breton -

http://www.artnet.com/artwork_images/106782/94358.jpg

I'll rest now, too :wink:
0 Replies
 
J-B
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 06:17 pm
Silly question: Which peninsula is "Britanny" Smaller on near Normandy?
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jul, 2006 10:54 pm
^JB^ wrote:
Silly question: Which peninsula is "Britanny" Smaller on near Normandy?


Here you have all French regions, in their borders as of today:

http://i6.tinypic.com/1zggn44.jpg
0 Replies
 
J-B
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2006 02:47 am
Thanks Mr. Hinteler Smile

(Never thought that Alsace and Lorraine are that north.)
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 10 Jul, 2006 05:46 am
Just an interjection...the larger island to the north of Brittany became Grand Bretagne or Great Britain.
0 Replies
 
 

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