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Le Tour 2006 - A Virtual Cultural Trip

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jul, 2006 09:59 am
being in Normandy, what would be better than having a "sole à la normande"?

4 Apples
1 c Bechamel sauce
1 c Baby shrimp
½ Sheet puff pastry
⅓ c Butter
4 ts Oil
4 Sole fillets (7 oz ea)
1 ts Parsley
2 ts Lemon juice

http://www.pauleischen.lu/images/themes/edition/eisolepe.jpg

Heat oven to 350. Cut tops from apples. Scoop away core & pulp, leaving shell. Mix sauce with shrimp. Stuff into cavity of apple. Bake 20-25 minutes or until tender. Cut pastry into 1 X 3" rectangles. Bake in oven with apples on separate shelf. In skillet, melt 4 tsp. butter with the oil. Reduce heat. Gently saute fillets 2 1/2-3 minutes on each side. Remove to heated platter. Add remaining butter, parsley & lemon juice. Cook to very hot. Pour over fish. Place apples around platter & garnish with pastry.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jul, 2006 01:22 pm
The "Pays d'Auge" is it, where we'll go tomorrow - the Tour passes this region I mean. :wink:

Of course Lisieux is a very interesting (not only for those on a pilgimage tot the tomb of Saint Thérèse de Lisieux [Lisieux is the most significant pilgrimage site in France after Lourdes], but we have a look at

Saint Germain de Livet castle


http://www.artandarchitecture.org.uk/assets/aa_image/700/5/1/b/a/51babc6df0408c866b218a8cc7f136828f3866de.jpg
The colors of the building stone of the Chateau-Germain-de-Livet and its green varnished brickwork give a fairy-tale appearance to this little castle, nestling in the valley bottom. Built in the 15/16th centuries it is perhaps the best example of the Renaissance architecture in the Pays d'Auge. It contains excellent furniture and 16th century frescoes.

http://membres.lycos.fr/michelhubin/photos/livet3.jpg
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jul, 2006 01:22 pm
http://i6.tinypic.com/1z545qp.jpg

http://i6.tinypic.com/1z545zl.jpg

http://i6.tinypic.com/1z54qk9.jpg
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jul, 2006 02:16 pm
Let's have something to eat again ... a soufflé d'artichauts

I like this artichoke and salmon souffle:

ARTICHOKE AND SMOKED SALMON SOUFFLE

2 tablespoons (about 1 ounce) finely chopped smoked salmon
4 medium-size artichokes
Lemon water (water to which the juice of a lemon has been added)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
1 1/2 cups milk
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
4 egg yolks
6 egg whites
1 tablespoon freshly grated Parmesan

1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper to taste
2 cups arugula leaves
2 slices of bacon, cooked until crisp and then crumbled

http://www.sicastpol.fr/legumes/320pixels/gd-artichaut.jpg

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Butter the inside of six 4-ounce ramekins. Cover the bottom of each with a single layer of chopped salmon. Set aside. Trim the outer leaves from each artichoke and cut off all but 1/2 inch of the stem. Steam for about 20 minutes, until the stem end can be easily pierced with the tip of a knife. Remove all the leaves and cut away the thistle down from the heart. Trim any tough bits from the heart. As you finish each, put in a bowl of lemon water while continuing with remaining artichokes. Finely chop (do not puree) all the hearts. Cover and set aside.

Melt the butter in a small saucepan over medium to low heat. Whisk in the flour and cook, whisking constantly, for about 3 minutes. Slowly pour in the milk, whisking constantly. If lumps develop, whisk vigorously. (You can also pour the sauce through a fine mesh strainer before adding the artichoke hearts.) Continue to cook until the sauce thickens, reducing the heat to low to prevent sticking or burning. Season with the salt and pepper. Once the sauce begins to thicken, coating the back of a spoon, stir in the artichokes. Whisk in the egg yolks, one at a time, and cook for another minute. Set the sauce aside.

Whisk the egg whites to soft peaks in a large bowl and fold the bechamel into the whites. Spoon the mixture into the prepared ramekins, filling each generously. Sprinkle a little Parmesan over each. Bake for about 20 minutes, until the tops are golden brown and firm to the touch.

While the souffles are baking, prepare the vinaigrette, whisk together the vinegar, mustard and olive oil, salt and peper to taste, drizzle over the arugula and toss.

Place each souffle on a dinner plate and mound about 1/2 cup of dressed arugula to the side. Sprinkle a little crumbled bacon over the arugula. Serves 6
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jul, 2006 02:25 pm
Letty wrote:
As usual, Walter, fantastic pictures and the desserts look so scrumptious. <sigh>, but what about Quiche Lorraine? ...
I think Quick Lorraine was the girl sans coulotte Laughing
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jul, 2006 02:40 pm
Normandy and Bretagne, those regions I stay at least once per year (again in about 8 weeks).

So, something not being visited sooooo much: Fougères.

http://i6.tinypic.com/1z58ac6.jpg

Fougères' major monument is a medieval stronghold built atop a granite ledge, which was part of the ultimately unsuccessful defence system of the Duchy of Brittany against French aggression. Fougères is a town of Art and History ... says Wikipedia.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/fr/thumb/5/5c/Foug%C3%A8res_ch%C3%A2teau2.jpg/800px-Foug%C3%A8res_ch%C3%A2teau2.jpg

Strengthened as of XIth century, the castle was built at the origin on a rock headland emerging from a marsh. The castle of Ferns, one of the principal keys of the duchy of Brittany, many times was besieged, ruined and rebuilt between XIth and XVth centuries. Also it offers a complete panorama of the military architecture, for the Romance time until constructions of triumphing artillery. With this architectural interest are added the richness of the historical and warlike memories, and the spectacular character due to the hugeness of the realization.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Jul, 2006 11:21 am
There's a lot to be seen on Saturday's etappe: Rennes, Dinan, Dinard, St. Malo - names, everyone knows.

But who knows e.g. the Château de la Hunaudaye?

http://www.frenchentree.com/france-brittany-tourism-leisure/images/chateauH.jpg

The Château de la Hunaudaye is a medieval fortified castle built in the 12th century, on a former gallo-roman setting at the edge of the Forest of La Hunaudaye.


http://i6.tinypic.com/1z73f3a.jpg


This is really a great place and I would like that you make a visual visit via this website there.

It's worth the click!
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Jul, 2006 11:47 am
Next, we do something different ... no recipes, but a visit to the ...

Bouillants cheese factory in Vern-sur-Seiche

http://www.letyrosemiophile.com/departements/ILLE-ET-VILAINE/vern-et5.jpg
http://www.letyrosemiophile.com/departements/ILLE-ET-VILAINE/Vern-usine.gif
http://www.letyrosemiophile.com/departements/ILLE-ET-VILAINE/vern-et4.jpg

The 20th-century buildings along the banks of the River Seiche produced butter, petit-suisse yoghurt and a variety of cheeses. The milk used came from some 30 towns and villages in the surrounding area in the 1960s.

Close by is the Bridel dairy in L'Hermitage:
The L'Hermitage dairy is a fine example of the union between industry and skilful architecture. The buildings, built between 1910 and 1912, combine brickwork and limestone, wood and slate.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Jul, 2006 12:00 pm
http://idata.over-blog.com/0/06/20/67/finistere/ille-et-vilaine/moulin-du-boel-bruz.jpg

http://idata.over-blog.com/0/06/20/67/finistere/ille-et-vilaine/moulin-du-boel-bruz-haut.jpg

The Mill of Boël (XVIIth century) is situated south of Rennes in a lovely valley, overhung by abrupt cliffs of purple schist
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Jul, 2006 12:12 pm
Brilliant Walter. I really feel I should pay to be on this tour. All the sites and tastes of France, without the cycling Very Happy
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Jul, 2006 12:13 pm
There are a couple of fine parliamentarians' manor houses and châteaux to be found arounf Rennes (referring to the ancient Parliament of Brittany there):

Château of Clayes
This 18th-century château features a classical façade true to the Enlightenment style. Its grounds were preceded by a long avenue, traces of which can still be seen to the south of the château.

http://bretagne-images.com/ille-et-vilaine/communes35/clayes/graphiques/photos/grand_format/clayes_chateau.jpg


Manor of Bourgchevreuil
This manor was built in the 17th century and owned by a Parlement councillor in 1620. It was originally used as a hunting lodge.

http://bretagne-images.com/ille-et-vilaine/communes35/cesson-sevigne/graphiques/photos/standard/cesson_bourgchevreuil1.jpg

Manor of La Fontaine
It would appear that the current manor stands in the place of a mediaeval fortification consisting of towers and moats. The manor features sober, classic lines and two pepper-pot towers.


Manor of Tizé
The Château of Tizé was built in the 16th century and belonged to numerous parliamentary families such as the Hay-des-Nétumières. The famous historian, Bertrand d'Argentré, also lived in Tizé.

http://www.ville-thorigne-fouillard.fr/esp_ent/pack_html/3page20050607090643_col_850105573/slide0035_image132.jpg
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 01:11 am
(puff puff puff) I'm having a little trouble keeping up. Is there a rest car I can get a ride in? (Pant pant)
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 01:42 am
dadpad wrote:
(puff puff puff) I'm having a little trouble keeping up. Is there a rest car I can get a ride in? (Pant pant)


Isn't that your bike?

http://www.labicyclettebleue.fr/image/devant%20velo.jpg
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 01:45 am
That Tize place is a bit different...
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 01:49 am
No thats my wifes........this one is like mine.

http://www.math.ohio-state.edu/~edgar/square_wheels.jpg
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 07:55 am
Bobby Julich just had a bad accident (by a stupid cycling fault): end of the tour for him Crying or Very sad
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ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 08:16 am
Marvellous eating tour!
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 08:17 am
ehBeth wrote:
Marvellous eating tour!


And I wondered, who was taking away the best pieces Shocked



:wink:
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 08:29 am
It's all about keeping your priorities straight Cool
0 Replies
 
Steve 41oo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 8 Jul, 2006 10:12 am
Mrs S has been ill but got up from her sick bed to enjoy the Tour de Walter
0 Replies
 
 

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