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Gormet charcoal. Who knew?

 
 
Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 10:57 am
Mr. B is heavy duty into grilling, smoking, cooking out this year. Recently he was looking for "real" charcoal without any success.

I thought that for Father's Day it might be kind of cool to get him a few bags of good charcaol. So off I went to Goggle and found this site that takes charcoal seriously:

http://www.nakedwhiz.com/lump.htm

Where in the world would one go to find these kinds of charcoal -- I don't think I have time to order them and I'd prefer not to pay for shipping.

Do you think the type of charcoal makes a big difference?

Do you have a favorite?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 1 • Views: 3,023 • Replies: 23
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Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 10:59 am
If you are willing to believe in gourmet charcoal, just give me a few days, and i'll be ready to ship. Postal money orders or cashier's checks only, please . . .
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 11:07 am
I suppose, the best charcoal is still the really "handmade" by a charburner - you've to preorder them here months in advance :wink:
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blacksmithn
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 11:13 am
Back before I bought my current home with it's built-in gas barbecue, I used to use lump mesquite charcoal. It worked great, burned hot (hot enough in fact that, with a little external air blown on it, I could heat iron to malleability) and gave the meat a nice flavor. And I could get it in 20 lb. sacks at any grocery store. I never needed to seek out anything more "gourmet" than that.
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hamburger
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 11:15 am
perhaps you can persuade walter to place an order with a ...HOLZKOHLEN-MEILER...
you'd be sure to get the proper 'holzkohle' (charcoal) .
hbg
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DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 11:27 am
I abandoned charcoal for casual grilling. Propane is just too convenient. No worries of lighter fluid-tasting food.

For serious smoking, I use straight wood for the smoke flavor, then transfer the meat to the oven for quality control.
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DrewDad
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 11:32 am
Does he have a set of high-quality grilling tools? Long handles, good metal?
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Walter Hinteler
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 11:33 am
Wood, just wooden tools.
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boomerang
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 11:50 am
Oh my gosh does this boy have accessories! We have a gas grill, a smoker and a charcoal grill with a lot of knicknacks and gadgets.

We also have just about every variety of wood you could dream of for adding flavors - Mr. B is in the wood business.

Reading around it seems that the big difference is between briquettes and lump charcoal with most preferring the lump style as it doesn't have any chemicals or fillers in it.

FINDING it seems to be the trick. I looked at ordering some but the shipping was as much as the order and that seems kind of stupid.

Maybe I should just look for some cedar planks as he doesn't have any of those.
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blacksmithn
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 12:07 pm
Do you have a Smart & Final in your area or a Lowes? I'm told you can find lump charcoal there for a reasonable price.
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dyslexia
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 12:07 pm
When the Lady Diane and meself are doing hotdogs on the patio we only use gourmet charcoal.
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roger
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 12:41 pm
<expecting>
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hamburger
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 01:13 pm
http://snobiz.com/images-hotdog/hot-dog-cover-blur250.jpg

'gourmet' hot dogs ( Razz ) grilled on 'gourmet' charcoal - you gotta taste it to believe it !
hbg

did you notice the guy has only three fingers on each hand ?
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boomerang
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 01:16 pm
Why does it feel so strange to have hamburger pushing hotdogs?

I don't want to even know what happened to his other fingers. Hotdogs are pretty scary anyway. But yummy.

I found Big Green Egg charcoal available locally. It is outrageously expensive but I think I'll pick up a bag. I'll let you all know if REAL charcoal makes any difference.
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farmerman
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 02:09 pm
Most charcoals are just cooked wood pallets. Formed by molds. Another big idea by Henry Ford.
If you have a trader Joes, they sell a lump charcoal which burns really quickly. I like the flavor of wood smoke in a separate fire box> I dont like the "gas grille no-taste" I may as well cook on the stove top . Its all a scam, organized so that you will feel that you must part with your money for some 3000$ POS stainless gas grill out in the patio, just to help your self esteem.
Its like SUVs.
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DrewDad
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 03:35 pm
My gas grill was $89 at Home Depot.... And I drive a Civic, too.
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dyslexia
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 03:39 pm
As a matter of fact, when we grill hot dogs over gourmet charcoal we also like a large glass of Mogan-David Wild Cherry over ice, it just seems so right.
Will there be Mogan-David in heaven?
Dear Lord, we'd all like to know;
Will there be Mogan David in heaven?
Sweet Jesus!!
If they don't,
Who the hell wants to go?
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blacksmithn
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 03:42 pm
My gas grill came with the house, so technically I guess it cost $550,000.

But I do drive a Mazda.
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boomerang
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 03:48 pm
I love our gas grill - no pots or pans to wash. That is easily worth the price of a SUV.
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farmerman
 
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Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 04:02 pm
600 EXPLOSIONS A YEAR FROM GAS GRILLS< ARE YOU PEOPLE NUTS?
Quote:
New, Safer Propane Tank for Barbecue Grills Helps to Avoid Gas Leaks
- Device Expected to Prevent Many of the 600 Fires/Explosions Each Year
WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) wants consumers to know that as of April 1, 2002, many state and local jurisdictions will require that all propane gas tanks being refilled for consumers to use with their barbecue grills must have a new safety device. The over-fill prevention device will help to avoid propane leaks that can cause fires and explosions. The new standard is published by the National Fire Protection Association.

"CPSC worked with industry to develop this safety standard to help prevent deaths and injuries," said CPSC Acting Chairman Thomas Moore. "As people trade in their old propane tanks for newer ones, we will see fewer fires."

Propane gas is highly flammable. Each year, about 600 fires/explosions occur with gas grills resulting in injuries to about 30 people. The new safety standard for propane gas tanks requires that an "over-fill prevention device" be installed in new gas tanks. The new propane gas tanks have valve handles with three "lobes" (prongs) while older tanks have valve handles with five prongs. Beginning April 1, only the new propane tanks will be sold or refilled nationwide. People with older propane gas tanks will need to get the new, safer tanks when they go in for a refill. While some dealers are trading in old tanks at no cost, others may charge a fee, which could range from $10 to $20.

An additional industry standard (adopted in 1995 at the urging of CPSC) provided for several safety features in the gas grills, hoses, and connections. The safety standard calls for a device to limit the flow of gas if the hose ruptures; a mechanism to shut-off the grill if it overheats; and a device to prevent the flow of gas if the connection between tank and grill is not leak-proof. People who have grills that do not meet the 1995 standard should either get a new grill or be especially attentive to the safety tips below.

Here are some safety tips to reduce the risk of fire or explosion with gas grills:


Check grill hoses for cracking, brittleness, holes, and leaks. Make sure there are no sharp bends in the hose or tubing.


Move gas hoses as far away as possible from hot surfaces and dripping hot grease.


Always keep propane gas containers upright.


Never store a spare gas container under or near the grill or indoors.


Never store or use flammable liquids, like gasoline, near the grill.


Never keep a filled container in a hot car or car trunk. Heat will cause the gas pressure to increase, which may open the relief valve and allow gas to escape.


Make sure your spark ignitor is consistently generating a spark to create a flame and burn the propane gas. If the flame is not visible, the heavier-than-air propane gas may be escaping and could explode.


Never bring the propane tank into the house.

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